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Topic Summary

Posted by: chuckv
« on: March 27, 2011, 20:11:02 »

JohnG,  Great hearing from you.  My dad's name was Charles (Chuck) Vulyak from Youngstown, Ohio.  Again, he was a Gunner in Battery "C".  I don't know what gun he was assigned to.  Six months before Allan English passed away, he sent me his privately published Log of the events of the Battalion and a List of the Battalion men.  He said he did not know my dad.  During the last 2 1/2 years, I wrote about 105 letters to some of the men on the List.  I received about 35 responses with odds and ends of their experiences.  None of these fine gentlemen knew my dad.  Of 750 men of the Battalion, 35 responses is a very small of percentage that might have known my dad.  If you go to the "Virtual Dover War Memorial" site and look for a short story I wrote about my dad, you will see a picture of him that might help you in your search.  Some of the men I wrote to were John Bowers, William Ring, Dan Wemple, William Jennings, Thomas English and Norman Brown.  I also wrote to Lt. William Payne but did not receive a reply.  William Jennings sent me Lt. Payne's story of the 127th.  I would be very grateful to you if I could view or purchase the book :the Fighting 127th".  Please advise if this is possible.  Regarding the photos of Normandy and France, I would also like to view these photos.  I do not have any photos of these places.  Thank you for your time and help.  Will post later.  ChuckV
Posted by: JohnG
« on: March 27, 2011, 17:26:09 »

chuckV.  Yes, I did meet Paul Alexa and Alan English, John Dimmer, Forest Brown, Robert Spanneruth and many more.  I helped with the organising of the monument and did a lot of research on the 127 AAA's period in Dover.  I was able to show the veterans to their gun sites.  I do have lists of "C" Battery at different dates.  I do not think you have ever mentioned who your father was, his name.  I have a book that Paul Alexa and others put together, 'The Fighting 127th', this has many names in it.  JohnG
Posted by: JohnG
« on: March 21, 2011, 22:37:23 »

Chuckv.  Sorry. I hope to look at the 127 AAA papers very soon.  In the past I posted photographs of 127 in Dover, I also have some of them on their way to Normandy and more of them in France. I received a lot of papers from Paul Alexa.  JohnG.
Posted by: statue1
« on: March 21, 2011, 22:21:11 »

Chuckv, I read the article you wrote about your dad, you should be very proud. I don't know for sure if my dad was at the Mass, but I have a letter he wrote on Dec. 24 1944 and given the tone and spirit of the letter I think he was there. If I can figure how to post pic's I'll put them up as soon as I get them digitized.
Posted by: chuckv
« on: March 21, 2011, 20:11:42 »

Statue1,  Just remembered a site you would want to look at...."Virtual Dover War Memorial".  It has a short article I wrote about my dad and Dover.  Its called " We Came To Serve".  This site is run by Maggie and another individual.  You can get info on the 127th.  Chuckv
Posted by: chuckv
« on: March 21, 2011, 19:55:00 »

Welcome Statue1,  I was just as excited as you when I found this Forum a week or 2 ago.  For now, let me tell you about the Midnight Mass that was held on Dec. 24, 1944 in Maastricht, Belgium.  The 127th was dug in around this Belgium town at the start of the Battle of the Bulge.  For some reason, men of the Battalion were invited to go to the Mass.  The Mass was held in the 1000 year old caves near Maastricht.
After the Mass, the Dutch monks and priests served the men coffee and donuts and asked them if they wanted to sign there names on the cave walls.  They used pieces of chalk or charcoal to sign.  To this day, the names are still legible.  Do you know if your father attended the services?  I have a few pictures of the 127th men.  I'll try and post them.  Please post yours.  My dad was a gunner in Battery "C".  Will post later.  Chuckv
Posted by: statue1
« on: March 21, 2011, 19:13:14 »

Hello, I just found this forum and I'm very excited. My father was Lt. Vincent McLean, he served at Dover Castle and was with the 127th throughout the war. He is mentioned in the Paul Alexa oral history in the Library of Congress. I'm very interested in the History of the 127th since I did not have a chance to ask my father. I have some pictures, but I think they where taken in Holland and Belgium, some of the people identified are Sgt. Thompson, Sgt. Heitz, Sgt Dillberto, Sgt Cook and Lt. Irwin. I will post the pic's if there is any interest. Any info about the 127th would be appreciated.
Posted by: chuckv
« on: March 10, 2011, 21:24:32 »

JohnG,  Thank you again for your post.  During the Memorial festivities (127th AAA Gun Bn.), did you meet Allan English, Paul Alexa or John Bowers (of the 127th)?  Paul donated his uniform to the Dover War Museum.  If I may, what role did you play during the planning, etc. of the Memorial?  Thank you again?  Chuckv   
Posted by: JohnG
« on: March 10, 2011, 19:56:04 »

ChuckV.  Will look through the papers as soon as I get a moment.  I was given quite a lot of papers from members of 127AAA when I helped with the memorial some years ago. JohnG
Posted by: chuckv
« on: March 10, 2011, 16:31:44 »

JohnG,  Thank you for your reply.  I do not have a list of the Gun Crews.  When you can, I would really be grateful if you could look for this info.  Will be patiently waiting for your post.  I think about a year and a half ago of later, the Kent Society printed an article that I wrote about my dad and the 127th.  I think the title was "Brave Battalion.....".  Its been awhile since it was printed.  I have been in contact with Maggie of the Virtual Dover War Memorial site.  She was and is very helpful in my research.  Will post later.  Thank you.
Posted by: JohnG
« on: March 10, 2011, 15:58:47 »

Hi ChuckV.
Sorry for delay in reply.  I am sorry the photos do not have any other information on them. I have other papers which may have the gun crews listed but you say you have many papers so you may have the same ones that I have. Let me know if you want me to look. JohnG
Posted by: chuckv
« on: March 09, 2011, 19:33:14 »

Thank you for your kind words.  During my research for the last 8 years, I have gathered up about 300 pages of documents, etc. on my dad's wwII history and the 127th AAA Gun Bn..  I have written to and received many responses from some of the men of the Battalion.  Before his passing, Allan English sent me a roster of the Battalion.  He, along with Paul Alexa and other men, attended the ceremonies, late in the 1980's, honoring the British and American Anti-aircraft units with monuments placed on the Upper Road.
As I said earlier, my dad was a gunner of Battery "C", 127th AAA.  The one photo dispayed on this site shows the back of a gunner loading the Gun as Major Jensen watches.  I wonder if its my dad?  That's why I asked in my first post if a name(s) were on the back of the photo.
I'm hoping in the near future to travel to Dover with my son Michael to see the area where our brave artillery men (British and American) fought.  Will post more later.  Chuckv


Posted by: Guest
« on: March 08, 2011, 17:48:40 »

chuckv: if you haven't already done so, check out the map on http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=9751.0;topicseen

Your dad and his mates (and other AAA units, too) did a good job.
Posted by: Alastair
« on: March 07, 2011, 12:52:52 »

Just a thought - the circular marks pointed out by TowerWill - could they have been emplacements dug for the AA guns? Or are they too symmetrical?
Posted by: chuckv
« on: March 06, 2011, 22:52:46 »

JohnG,  Hello.  I just happen to find this site while researching my dad's WWII history.  I've been doing this research for about 8 years.  He was a gunner, Battery "C", 127th AAA Gun Battalion.  Obviously, he too was on the White Cliffs of Dover from Aug. to the last part of Sept., 1944.  Your information presented on this Forum is fantastic!  I wonder if there are names on the back of one of your pictures displayed recently?  The caption for this picture reads:  "Major Jensen watches "C" Battery limber up.  Dover."  If there are names,  would you please post them?  I would appreciate it beyond words.  I'll return to this Forum at another time soon.  I have alot of data on the 127th.  Thank you. 
Chuckv.
Posted by: Andyb
« on: January 19, 2011, 20:26:53 »

Thankyou JohnG for the time you have spent putting these into the public domain.


Andy
Posted by: TowerWill
« on: January 19, 2011, 08:52:38 »

Ted Ingham's AP in reply #34 "Old Road out of Broadlees Bottom" shows these fields as having plenty of trenches dug into them in 1940.Maybe the rings were connected with these.But maybe i've rediscovered some Neolithic round house sites!Another look at the list of ancient sites required.
Posted by: TowerWill
« on: January 18, 2011, 10:56:53 »


From Google Earth.In the field on the cliff side of Upper Road are a couple ring shaped crop marks(green arrows).I wonder if they had something to do with this battery?The old railway(red arrow)is also shown.This is from the 2007 historical imagery on Google Earth.I'm afraid the 2002 imagery doesn't show these(discussion on another thread).
Posted by: JohnG
« on: January 12, 2011, 20:05:36 »

I post a few more 127AAA photographs for those interested.


The Tomies carch two 12 inchers from the Cape. Sept 1944.
There is a British AA Mk 2 GL Radar in the centre.


British garage at Dover after a 16 inch shell hit the roof. Aug 1944.
I think this is one of the hangers.


Dover England Aug 1944. Two British 15 inch guns blast German gun emplacements in the
 Cap Griss Nez area on the French coast, as the 127 Hq personnel take to the slit trenches.

JohnG
Posted by: Alastair
« on: January 03, 2011, 16:39:07 »

Another observation - in the picture of D Battery, is that a rangefinder covered up in the mid foreground?
Alastair
Posted by: Alastair
« on: January 02, 2011, 16:58:35 »

Thanks. By way of observation of those terrific photos, has anyone noticed the tents have names on them? One appears to read 'Baker & Baker Jr, Future (something)' and another has Marie on it. The main observation is of the water tower. That is very definitely Victorian so obviously not built for the RFC. So what was here before the Air Forece arrived in WW1?
Alastair
Posted by: Guest
« on: January 02, 2011, 16:18:12 »

No, they're not listed online: I think you'd have to write or call. I am pretty certain the ref nos are correct. David
Posted by: Alastair
« on: January 02, 2011, 16:15:43 »

Thanks. Haven't been able to find them on those ref nos but I'll persevere. Appreciate the help
Alastair
Posted by: Guest
« on: January 02, 2011, 05:41:13 »

Alastair: re plans, the IWM photographic collection has a couple of WW1 vertical aerial photos (I'm pretty sure their references are Q111406/7) which show the layout of huts, and on one of them each hut is identified.
Posted by: JohnG
« on: January 01, 2011, 19:40:17 »

The photograph showing the four CH masts with the hangers.  The blob on the left must be a gun with a cover over it, the axil and two wheels these guns had are nexr to it. JohnG.
Posted by: doug
« on: January 01, 2011, 19:28:52 »

I Do not have a plan for Swingate, The late Frank Cheeseman had a full set of plans for most ww1 airfields, on his death his papers went to the Fleet Air Arm Museum. We do have an aerial photo of Swingate Radar Station, and a large part of the airfield, this is on show in the RAF Manston museum, at Manston.
Posted by: JohnG
« on: January 01, 2011, 16:46:30 »

A few more 127 AAA Photographs that might be of interest.  JohnG


Major Jensen watches 'C' Battery limber up. Dover.


'D' Battery in the foreground. Aug 1944,


Capt John Dimmer taken in Bn Hqs building Dover Aug 1944.


Col Arnold unvailing the monument


The British and American Guard of Honour. Salute fire with 25 Pdrs.

Hope they are of interest to some of you. JohnG
Posted by: JohnG
« on: December 31, 2010, 19:01:49 »

A few more 127 photos from JohnG


Towers and airodrome in back ground with peaked roofs of latrrines. May be shell hole dirt in foreground. Can't identify dark area on left.


Pause in the firing.


Gun 3 in position being cleaned. This must have  been in the first week of arriving because the gun revetment is incomplete. Robert Malhoit on left and maybe Robert 'Jake' Jacaby on right. Corrigated metal is the begining of a shelter to be built at the end of the leftoutriggers. Barbed wire fence in the back ground is part of the British defences against German invasion.


One of the old orderly rooms in the area.

JohnG
Posted by: JohnG
« on: December 31, 2010, 17:31:48 »

To the 127 AAA fans, a few more photographs that may interest you.


August 4 - 8 One of the WW1 hangers used when airplanes were ferried from England to France.


Gun 3 on left. Robert 'Jake' Jaacoby. Maybe Julius Hettle on right.
Some of the names may be a bit out as the writing is difficult to read,


Work in progress building revitment and revitment.
 Tent to left, Eric Anderson and Julius Hettle, Can't identify people around the gun.


Posted by: Alastair
« on: December 27, 2010, 16:42:08 »

Terrific, JohnG - have these ever been seen in public in recents years? Thanks for showing them.
Alastair
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