News: Gypsy tart originated from the Isle of Sheppey
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Topic Summary

Posted by: davpott
« on: July 03, 2012, 00:00:07 »

I visited Deal Castle many years ago with one of the old DOE workmen. Up on the roof we looked at a brass plate which had a line marked across it with Walmer on one side and Deal on the other, the parish boundry went through the middle of the castle.  It turns out that all three castles were built on the parish boundries.  By doing this they avoided paying all the local taxes.  On the Walmer side of Deal Castle there used to be a foot bridge across the moat to the castle, you can see it in some of the old postcards.  The reason for this bridge was coal with its tax was cheaper to buy in Walmer than Deal, by using the bridge the coal did not enter Deal.
I was supprised to read a few years ago, in the local paper, that they had just discovered the bell in the cupola, I saw it years ago, it was not secrete.

Looking the Old Maps website the Deal castle story has some truth as most of it lies on the Walmer side of the boundary but Walmer castle is entirely in Walmer, likewise Camber castle is not built on a boundary. While its a nice story I doubt if Henry VIII's engineers worried too much about local taxes ( or assessments as they were known) when they sited the new defences.  Also as the local assessments were based on land value I doubt, if they paid at all, they would be valued at very much.
Posted by: JohnG
« on: July 02, 2012, 22:03:31 »

I visited Deal Castle many years ago with one of the old DOE workmen. Up on the roof we looked at a brass plate which had a line marked across it with Walmer on one side and Deal on the other, the parish boundry went through the middle of the castle.  It turns out that all three castles were built on the parish boundries.  By doing this they avoided paying all the local taxes.  On the Walmer side of Deal Castle there used to be a foot bridge across the moat to the castle, you can see it in some of the old postcards.  The reason for this bridge was coal with its tax was cheaper to buy in Walmer than Deal, by using the bridge the coal did not enter Deal.
I was supprised to read a few years ago, in the local paper, that they had just discovered the bell in the cupola, I saw it years ago, it was not secrete.
Posted by: cliveh
« on: October 14, 2011, 15:52:41 »

'Fraid I can't say Alastair - perhaps someone else can help?

cliveh
Posted by: Alastair
« on: October 14, 2011, 15:15:17 »

On the left of the picture, above the battlements, is that the Naval Yard in the distance?

Alastair
Posted by: Riding With The Angels
« on: October 13, 2011, 21:06:39 »

Marvellous photos, Clive H & Kyn. Iv'e been there several times, though not recently. All three castles - Deal Sandown and Walmer were built to a similar design, the Tudor Rose, using much of the stone from dissolved monasteries. Occasionally you can see an ecclesiastic-looking stone (you'll know when you see it) in amongst the others.
There was a building added for the Governor on the seaward side of the castle which spoilt it completely but fortunately it was bombed in the last war so the castle was rebuilt in its original state.
Liked the pic of the gun trained on the Queen's flats, John V.
Alastair

I heard this from the keyholder at East Langdon church when I visited there. Apparently Deal Castle has some stone heads from Langdon Abbey.
Posted by: cliveh
« on: September 27, 2011, 08:50:15 »

Here's a postcard image of the castle dated 1904. Apologies for the poor quality which is down to the rather faded original.  You can just make out, on the seaward side the square towers of the Governor's Lodgings which was destroyed by German bombs in 1941.



cliveh
Posted by: Stewie
« on: January 20, 2011, 18:38:37 »

We visited both Deal and Walmer Castles last year with my father. Makes an interesting comparison going to the original design at Deal and then viewing the heavily modified Walmer castle.
Posted by: Alastair
« on: January 20, 2011, 16:51:56 »

Marvellous photos, Clive H & Kyn. Iv'e been there several times, though not recently. All three castles - Deal Sandown and Walmer were built to a similar design, the Tudor Rose, using much of the stone from dissolved monasteries. Occasionally you can see an ecclesiastic-looking stone (you'll know when you see it) in amongst the others.
There was a building added for the Governor on the seaward side of the castle which spoilt it completely but fortunately it was bombed in the last war so the castle was rebuilt in its original state.
Liked the pic of the gun trained on the Queen's flats, John V.
Alastair
Posted by: Captain James T Kirk
« on: July 08, 2010, 14:20:28 »

What a wonderful collection of photographs! (Both this and the first set). I'm hoping to visit England next year and must see this.
Posted by: cliveh
« on: July 07, 2010, 19:40:21 »

Some pics of the exterior from my visit today:













cliveh
Posted by: busyglen
« on: May 03, 2010, 10:02:45 »

Great pictures!  I have been there a couple of times when we have visited Deal to go to the RM Concerts each year on the green.

As a small point of interest.  My mother was born and lived in Upper Deal and used to work as a Cook for a private house.  On one occasion, the lady of the house, lent my mother to the Castle so that she could help prepare food for a large function.

 
Posted by: ellenkate
« on: May 02, 2010, 16:44:23 »


I like the peppermint green paint on first floor!  I am ashamed to say I have never been inside Deal Castle, though I live near.

Samuel Tavener, commander of Deal Castle:
During the Cromwellian period, Cromwell appointed Samuel Tavener to be commander of Deal Castle, and many of Samuel's children were born there.  Samuel sometime later relinquished this post, moved to Dover, where he kept a grocery business, and after hearing an early member of Dover Baptists speaking in the street, Samuel joined them and helped to establish their cause.
There are many local descendants of Samuel Tavener, including the Hornsby, Finnis, etc families of Deal etc.

Samuel TAVERNER Snr married  (Essex?)

their son Samuel TAVERNER Jnr      married 1649 (1)Ann GIBBS of Word/Worth
he was chr 22 June 1621                              she died 1665 aged 42,
at Romford, Essex                                        buried Upper Deal, Kent
died 1696 Dover,Kent                 married (2) Susannah HARRISON of Dover in 1665.  No issue.

Samuel and Ann had several sons, believed all born in Deal Castle

Descent goes down to.....
Thomas TAVERNOR of Deal   married at    Sholden  to Jane TOMLIN of Deal
                                 by Lic on Jan 1720-21

Thomas and Jane TAVENOR's daughter Priscilla TAVERNOR chr 23.5.1722 Deal  
         married John HORNSBY/HORNBY or HOMBY by Banns 23.5.1743

John and Priscilla HORNSBY had twin sons  
(chr.28.5.1750 Deal,   Tomlin HORNSBY and Thomas HORNSBY)

Thomas HORNSBY married Sara CRANBROOK (or CRAMBROOK) by Banns on 18.1.1774 at Deal      
                                                                    (witnesses: Wm TAVENER and
Wm NUNNS?)
their daughter Sara HORNSBY
(born 7/1784, chr 13.8.1784, died 7/1865) married John FINNIS of Deal Nov 1804.  
John and Sara FINNIS  had a large family, 10, and there are many descendants.


Samuel Tavener was buried in the baptist church part of the old St Martins burial ground in Dover, which was cleared for development and the historic memorials disappeared.  See Dover Society history scrapbook website under old St Martins Dover for a painting showing the Tavener graves.


Posted by: kyn
« on: May 02, 2010, 16:01:51 »

We had a little visit to the castle today, here are some photo's with some information to come at a later date.
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