News: “Over the graves of the Druids and under the wreck of Rome,
Rudely but surely they bedded the plinth of the days to come.
Behind the feet of the Legions and before the Norseman’s ire
Rudely but greatly begat they the framing of State and Shire
Rudely but deeply they laboured, and their labour stand till now.
If we trace on ancient headlands the twist of their eight-ox plough.”

-Rudyard Kipling
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Modify message

Please help keep the forum tidy by using suitable grammar and punctuation.
Subject:
Message icon:

Verification:
Type the letters shown in the picture Type the letters shown in the picture Type the letters shown in the picture Type the letters shown in the picture Type the letters shown in the picture Type the letters shown in the picture
Listen to the letters / Request another image

Type the letters shown in the picture:
Who is Admin on this site?:
Last name of website:
First name of website:
What is the last month of the year?:

shortcuts: hit alt+s to submit/post or alt+p to preview


Topic Summary

Posted by: Bluesbat
« on: September 03, 2014, 13:23:54 »

Fang were a good, tight little band. Shame about Keith. I didn't know that he was no longer with us. Jammed with him a couple of times up at the Tam 'O Shanter. Here are a few names of bands that I can remember from Medway and beyond mid to late 70's

Winkle Bill, Baby Grand, Sindelfingen, Cenet Rox, The Pop Rivets, Crow Jane Blues Band, Saracen, Nicky Moore Band, Diablo, LBW, No Mercy. All very good bands in their day and some extremely talented musicians amongst them. Anyone else remember any of these or others?
Diablo...Yes indeed...Excellent multi percussive Santana type outfit, original line up was based in London with just drummer vocalist Ray King from Medway, the second line up which won the national Wheatley taverns heat at the Old Ash Tree was Tony Parsons Gtr/vocals - Ray King drums/vocals - Pete Burt Bass (went on to play in the Frankie Miller band) - Bobby Stignac (who also played with Gonzalez) Don Rey timbales (deceased) - the other guitarists name I can't remember......There was a third line up as well which did a fantastic BBC radio Medway session with Mike Brill
Posted by: oobydooby
« on: December 28, 2013, 16:54:10 »

No, I'm sorry, Babs, I was just being a bit petulant.  And it's ooby with lower case 'oo'.

And still on topic....When I worked in the White Cliffs Hotel in the early/mid 1960's there was a group who played first in the basement bar, then latterly in the main restaurant called 'The Gremlins'. I occasionally joined them onstage in my waiters attire (back dickie bow tie and trousers, white shirt and jacket) to sing '24 Hours From Tulsa', much to the anger of the manager, a Mr Bourdini and the head waiter a Monsieur LeTigre. I wonder if anyone has heard of them or knows what happened to them.
Posted by: babs
« on: December 28, 2013, 15:38:09 »

Sorry Oobydooby, I didn't mean it was irrelevant to the site.  In fact, all of the originals came from the Medway Towns, one of whom went on to be Mayor.
Posted by: oobydooby
« on: December 27, 2013, 18:17:12 »

The Vanity Fayre that Oobydooby speaks about is certainly not the original band.  The originals would be either approaching or past their 70's by now.  The originals went their separate ways back in the early 70's.
I don't dispute that, but whatever else they may be or have been, three of them are from Kent, so can be still be relevant to this thread.
Posted by: babs
« on: December 27, 2013, 15:15:10 »

The Vanity Fayre that Oobydooby speaks about is certainly not the original band.  The originals would be either approaching or past their 70's by now.  The originals went their separate ways back in the early 70's.
Posted by: RogerGunkel
« on: November 30, 2013, 15:29:00 »

Hi Ann :)

The Tony Hayes that I knew about definately lived in Hoo.(this would be the very early '80's) He is credited for co-writing "Black is Black" with Michelle Grainger and Steve Wadey. The song was a No.1 hit in 1966 for Los Bravos. It was later covered by a French Disco Girl Group La Belle Epoque   in 1977 which reached No2 in the British Charts.
Hadn't looked at this thread for a while, but have a few additions to this post. I never met Tony Hayes  but, while working for a short while as a draughtsman in Strood, a new draughtsman joined the firm called Steve Wadey. He told me he lived in Hoo and had co-written Black is Black and although I was dubious at first, we got to know each other well through a mutual interest in music. I was only 19 at the time and Steve had quite an influence on me over the months that we worked together, as he encouraged me to start my own business. He showed me how to set up a limited company and was a great believer in pushing yourself.

Steve was always telling me he was waiting for a royalty cheque from his publisher, which was why he was working as a draughtsman, and was going to start building multi track studio recorders as soon as the cheque arrived. One day he walked into the drawing office with a big smile on his face, saying he had received a cheque for South American royalties for £30000 and was immediately handing in his notice. I did wonder whether it was Steve who bought out Tony Hayes, as he was a shrewd guy.

I kept loose contact with him for a few years, and sure enough, he started a company called 'Cadey' which produced early multi track studio recorders. It became quite successful and in the early 1980s, I actually came by one of his recorders for my own studio? I believe Steve moved to Australia where he carried on with a successful business, but I have no idea what he is doing now.

Roger
Posted by: oobydooby
« on: November 29, 2013, 15:26:03 »

Re: Vanity Fare.
Vanity Fare were still going strong and touring with the Solid Silver Sixties Show in 2012.  I saw them in Dundee where they were backing Peter Noone (Herman's Hermits), Chris Montez, Brian Hyland and Brian Poole of the Tremoloes.  In previous years with the same show they supported Dave Berry, Chris Farlowe and Wayne Fontana.

Their line-up then, and presumably still is, Mark Ellen, Bernie Hagley and the fabulous Eddie Wheller, all from the Medway area and Steve Oakman whose birthplace I cannot establish.

At a signing session after the gig, from the back of the crowd, I shouted "Up the Gills" as Hagley was from Gillingham and they gave a cheer and I spent a few minutes chatting to them about Kent.

They do have a web site and fan pages.
Posted by: John38
« on: November 29, 2013, 15:07:40 »

Not the same type of band that has gone before, but I was a member of the St John Ambulance Brigade`s (as it was) band in Sheerness. We had a great time and did every carnival in Kent and got as far as Chelmsford and Harwich. Real claim to fame was Rod Hull (later of Emu fame) and me playing a fanfare in St Paul's Cathedral for HRH The Princess Margaret.
Posted by: oobydooby
« on: November 29, 2013, 14:11:45 »

Whilst working at Squires & Knight [formally Barnes & Brookers] I worked on the car owned by the lad who wrote [helped write?] the big 60s hit "Black is Black" if I remember right he sold his rights to the song for the price of this second hand Ford Corsier. Think he came from Hoo and was courting Squires daughter.

I thought his first name was Tony too, but dont recognise the Hayes surname - tall chap with blonde hair. I recall him driving a sports type car..  My chap lived at Knights Place, Strood, but used to frequent a pub in Hoo with a chap called Bob.   (ah memories - if only I could remember them in detail!)

Crumbs!!  My name is Tony Hayes, not the one referred to here, and my brothers name is Bob.  My uncle used to work in the refinery at Hoo and I often frequented a pub there in the 1960's, as well as the social club.  At the time I lived in Gillingham.
Posted by: afsrochester
« on: November 27, 2013, 22:52:57 »

I knew Alan Ryder when I worked at the Council with him and when I was active in the Medway music scene (1970/93) Alan was a really friendly chap and we always stopped and chatted about music whenever our paths crossed. Obviously I knew about his band, but never saw them.

His Son Jez, (a first rate guitarist and singer) became internationally famous with Wang Chung 1977/91. He is now known professionally as "Jack Hues."
Posted by: sandynan46
« on: October 11, 2013, 21:47:49 »

Lord Padlock, I am proud to say played at my wedding in 1967.  Dave Pope is a great friend, and as Jim Bell says  is still living in Wouldham as he did back in the day.(Hi Jim, this is Sandra Harrod)

Can anyone remember a dance band though, called Alan Ryder Band, they used to play at the Pavillion in Gillingham, late fifties, early sixties.  My uncle Ken was the drummer. 
Posted by: Jim Bell
« on: September 17, 2013, 18:32:17 »

 Thanks PeterJ.
My memory told me it was Melvyn Wallace ...not Mervyn, though I could be wrong.
A brilliant guitarist...especially with the old "Rock" songs, such as Route 66.
Trying to recall Lead Singers name.??? I believe he lived behind Tesco in Chatham.
I used to go round Holiday Camps with them on Sheppey, and I recall a competition held at The Lido in Margate.
Posted by: Peterj
« on: September 16, 2013, 21:07:14 »

The drummer with the Padlocks was Harvey Keys.
Posted by: Peterj
« on: September 16, 2013, 21:02:52 »

Lord Padlock show band also had the the two Wallace brothers in it, Malcolm and Mervyn. The latter was arrested in the Far East for drug offences I seem to recall.
Before he joined the "Padlocks" Dave Pope played with the late Bill Dobbie in Phase Three.
Posted by: Jim Bell
« on: September 15, 2013, 09:12:45 »

What a great site.
Andy Neal now plays with Dirtie Bertie, and has a roofing business in Rainham.
Does anyone remember Lord Padloc Showband from the 70's?
Dave Pope still lives in Wouldham.
Posted by: JohnWalker
« on: September 14, 2013, 19:07:34 »

"With many other types of English progressive music developing mostly in London, it may at first seem strange that the old pilgrimage centre and relatively quiet cathedral city of Canterbury became the centre of this very English form of progressive music and jazz fusion....
...Canterbury was then to be the cradle for several of the more freewheeling bands of the post-psychedelic era."


Everything you wanted to know about about the Canterbury scene can probably be found here @ http://www.progarchives.com/subgenre.asp?style=12
Daevid Allen to Zyma, via Kevin Ayers, the Wilde Flowers, Robert Wyatt, etc. top 100 albums, reviews, sample songs, etc.
Useful too for the wider prog rock scene.
Enjoy.

An amazing period in music history.  Many of the bands and musicians mentioned were customers who used my music shop in The Friars, Canterbury (Socodi Music Ltd).  In addition to the prog rock guys many of the local bands had their own transit vans.  A Saturday would find a long line of them parked outside my shop (before yellow lines) and inside the shop was a regular jam session.  Good times...
Posted by: afsrochester
« on: September 14, 2013, 18:40:12 »

An update on Baby Grand.

Rufus was a member of BG in all but name from early 1979. He took over from Bubbs Hardy when he left, who had in turn replaced Simon Hurst.

They reformed in 1995/6 with Mark's brother Matthew on Drums ( he is mentioned elsewhere in this topic).

Baby Grand are still playing today with Andy Jenkins now occupying the drum slot. (He is a fantasic drummer and a nice bloke as well.)

I know I'm biased, but BG have always been a great little band, and if you get the chance, GO AND SEE THEM! You won't be disappointed.
Posted by: Clankypup
« on: March 23, 2013, 20:36:34 »

I too have got a signed copy of "A Kentish Garland" by Tundra. I think that I saw them playing a small venue in Maidstone in the late 70s.
Posted by: mad4amanda
« on: March 23, 2013, 13:33:59 »

I was at school with Nitin Sawhney, he was a couple of years above me but wow what a guitar player!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitin_Sawhney
He appears to have done quite well.
Has anyone else come across "Tundra" folk group from the 1970s? I still have a signed album "A Kentish Garland", think I saw them at The Old Ash Tree but it could have been elsewhere, most of their songs were very Kent/Medway based.
In the very early 70s, a Folkestone group called Captain Black played at a friend`s party, they were quite good.
Posted by: numanfan
« on: February 28, 2013, 09:45:06 »

The March 2013 copy of Record Collector magazine has a feature on the 'Canterbury Sound'. I only glanced at it in W.H.Smith's, it's mainly about the group Caravan but I think some other groups are mentioned as well.

http://recordcollectormag.com/articles/a-canterbury-tale
Posted by: HERB COLLECTOR
« on: February 20, 2013, 23:16:39 »

Kevin Ayers, musician, born Herne Bay 16 August 1944, died Montoliev, France, 18 February 2013.

Stranger in Blue Suede Shoes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ip0ewd_p-fg
Posted by: smiler
« on: December 28, 2012, 09:45:47 »

The Dentist's played regularly in the Good Intent, Rochester in the mid 80s.
Posted by: silkenrobe
« on: December 24, 2012, 08:26:05 »


The Dentists (Medway)


Ah, a very good claim to fame - I was at school, from infants to secondary with Bob Collins  :)
Posted by: afsrochester
« on: December 23, 2012, 20:57:12 »

Other members of Baby Grand over the years have been:

 Jon Hayes (drums) Colin Mcleod, (drums) Simon Darby, (Bass),  Melvyn Arnott (Bass), Jeff Faulkener (Bass), Valerie Hill (Vocals), Simon Hurst (keyboards), Bubbs Hardy (Guitar) and Ian "Rufus" Rufel (Guitar).

The original line-up was Dermot, Gina, Richard, Melvyn and Jon.

The final line up in November 1979 when the band split was,

Dermot, Richard, Rufus, Mark and Myself.
Posted by: afsrochester
« on: December 23, 2012, 14:37:55 »

I used to sing with Baby Grand in the 70s, we had a great band.

Not 'Arf! :)

Gina Carter (Vocals) Dermot Bassett (Vocals) Richard Manktelow (Guitar) MarK Letley (Bass) and yours truly (Drums).
Posted by: gina drexler
« on: December 22, 2012, 16:32:16 »

I used to sing with Baby Grand in the 70s, we had a great band, still love music and go to many gigs, seems an age ago....Gina Drexler living at New Romney!!!
Posted by: HERB COLLECTOR
« on: November 25, 2012, 22:59:19 »

Whilest in my Apprenticeship in the Dockyard (winter 68-69 ) I worked with a Guy called Barry Bailey. He was Guitarist in a band called .. Backhouse James Blues Band.. I remember they recorded an album which featured in a full page article in the Chatham Standard.

The Backhouse James Blues Band album was recorded in 1968 and just 30 copies were pressed.
The current price (if you can find a copy) is £1,800++!!
http://eil.com/shop/moreinfo.asp?catalogid=569320
http://www.kentonline.co.uk/medway_messenger/news/2012/september/15/rare_vinyl.aspx ( May be slow link.)
Posted by: HERB COLLECTOR
« on: September 12, 2012, 00:44:07 »

"With many other types of English progressive music developing mostly in London, it may at first seem strange that the old pilgrimage centre and relatively quiet cathedral city of Canterbury became the centre of this very English form of progressive music and jazz fusion....
...Canterbury was then to be the cradle for several of the more freewheeling bands of the post-psychedelic era."


Everything you wanted to know about about the Canterbury scene can probably be found here @ http://www.progarchives.com/subgenre.asp?style=12
Daevid Allen to Zyma, via Kevin Ayers, the Wilde Flowers, Robert Wyatt, etc. top 100 albums, reviews, sample songs, etc.
Useful too for the wider prog rock scene.
Enjoy.
Posted by: JohnWalker
« on: July 30, 2012, 20:39:27 »

Coke and crisps! You must have all been listening to Lucy in the sky with diamonds!

 :)  That would be it - but unfortunately not - just coca cola and packets of crisps with the little blue twist of paper with salt in.  Rolling Stones, Shadows, Beatles and the rest of the Mersey mob.  The nearest we got to lighting effects was if a starter failed in one of the flourescent lights  :)
Posted by: Peterj
« on: July 29, 2012, 16:33:38 »

Coke and crisps! You must have all been listening to Lucy in the sky with diamonds!
BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines