News: In June 1557 Edmund Allin, his wife and five others were burnt at the stake, where Drakes pub now stands in Fairmeadow, Maidstone, for refusing to accept Catholicism.
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Topic Summary

Posted by: Admiral D Ascoyne
« on: September 29, 2012, 17:37:46 »

The clear canoe would be awesome, although they're 3 x the cost of a normal canoe!

I'm still seeking the history of Darnet Ness as in where the name 'Darnet' comes from?

I was thinking the name might be relatively recent as the old O/S maps of this area show Darnet as being Bishops Saltings?
Posted by: bromptonboy
« on: September 27, 2012, 18:21:52 »

Darnett Ness is the geographical location for Fort Darnett.
Posted by: Admiral D Ascoyne
« on: September 27, 2012, 13:58:21 »

The next time I go I intend to get right into the cassmates. First trip was just a paddle round the inner ring and it was rather scary. :)

Does anyone know why it's Darnet; was it named after someone?
Posted by: swiftone
« on: September 25, 2012, 12:38:02 »

The flooding must have created an eerie atmosphere. A good set of photos.
Posted by: grandarog
« on: September 24, 2012, 15:49:01 »

Great Pics Admiral D Ascoyne  :)
 Thanks for sharing with us :)
Posted by: Admiral D Ascoyne
« on: September 24, 2012, 14:26:23 »

and a few more
Posted by: Admiral D Ascoyne
« on: September 24, 2012, 14:21:58 »

a few more..
Posted by: Admiral D Ascoyne
« on: September 24, 2012, 14:18:35 »

and some more...
Posted by: Admiral D Ascoyne
« on: September 24, 2012, 14:14:17 »

I went camping this w/end on Darnet Island so I thougt I'd add to the forums 'library pictures'...

Posted by: Admiral D Ascoyne
« on: August 26, 2012, 13:14:35 »

This is from the English Heritage's Pastscape for the area.

"The remains of a post medieval sea wall can be seen on aerial photographs taken in 2007. This sea wall once enclosed part of Bishop Saltings and is depicted on the 1862 Ordnance Survey map. Within this enclosed area was a cement works (NMR 1541788). The 1862 map also depicts a 'Beer House' at the south west corner of the enclosed area at TQ 8086 7058. By 1896 the sea had broken through the sea defences. Surviving lengths are centred on TQ 8093 7074 and TQ 8095 7063. These defences were mapped from aerial photographs as part of the English Heritage: Hoo Peninsula Landscape Project. (1-3) "

http://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=1541810

So, there seems to have been some sort of "Pub", but I am guessing that the circular foundations are probably connected to the cement works. So I dug a bit more, and came up with this, again on Pastscape:

"A 19th century cement works on Bishop Saltings is depicted on the 1862 Ordnance Survey map. Rectangular remains of this can be seen on aerial photographs taken in 2007. The cement works were situated within an area defended by a sea wall. The cement works had gone by 1896, the sea wall breached and parts of the saltings lost to the sea. This site was mapped from aerial photographs as part of the English Heritage: Hoo Peninsula Landscape Project."

http://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=1541788

According to the Medway Pilots site, there eleven cement works along the Medway by 1865. A beer house makes sense, as a cement works must have been a thirsty place to work, and bearing in mind, beer was a lot weaker then, and safer to drink than the water.

Wessex Archaeology's North Kent Coast Rapid Coastal Zone Survey Phase II Field Assessment Year's One and Two Report contains several references to the area in addition to Darnet Fort. 

Year One of the report can be found here: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/publications/north-kent-coast-phase-ii-year-1-2004/nkcphaseiiyear1-56750.02-jan2005.pdf

Year Two of the report can be found here: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/publications/north-kent-coast-phase-ii-year-2-2005/nkcphaseiiyear2-56751.01-march2006sml.pdf

All the references for the Darnet Island/Bishops Saltings are in year one and these included Roman salt workings, and references to the cement works and beer house, but also a Roman kiln...although things in the photos above don't look like the bases of Roman kilns.

Hope this all helps Ascoyne.

Many thanks for this, its a fantastic discovery for me!!
Posted by: Admiral D Ascoyne
« on: August 26, 2012, 13:13:00 »

I'm not sure what the mystery is. The cement works was there when the fort was built and closed when it was finished. The pub also closed down. Here's a reference to the pub http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=9410.0 but I think if you search the forum and www.old-maps.co.uk you will find other references.
I also posted a map here http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=9359.msg77628#msg77628

Thank you, this is historical gold to me!!
Posted by: swiftone
« on: August 25, 2012, 12:03:52 »

I'm not sure what the mystery is. The cement works was there when the fort was built and closed when it was finished. The pub also closed down. Here's a reference to the pub http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=9410.0 but I think if you search the forum and www.old-maps.co.uk you will find other references.
I also posted a map here http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=9359.msg77628#msg77628
Posted by: Andrew401968
« on: August 24, 2012, 19:51:17 »

This is from the English Heritage's Pastscape for the area.

"The remains of a post medieval sea wall can be seen on aerial photographs taken in 2007. This sea wall once enclosed part of Bishop Saltings and is depicted on the 1862 Ordnance Survey map. Within this enclosed area was a cement works (NMR 1541788). The 1862 map also depicts a 'Beer House' at the south west corner of the enclosed area at TQ 8086 7058. By 1896 the sea had broken through the sea defences. Surviving lengths are centred on TQ 8093 7074 and TQ 8095 7063. These defences were mapped from aerial photographs as part of the English Heritage: Hoo Peninsula Landscape Project. (1-3) "

http://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=1541810

So, there seems to have been some sort of "Pub", but I am guessing that the circular foundations are probably connected to the cement works. So I dug a bit more, and came up with this, again on Pastscape:

"A 19th century cement works on Bishop Saltings is depicted on the 1862 Ordnance Survey map. Rectangular remains of this can be seen on aerial photographs taken in 2007. The cement works were situated within an area defended by a sea wall. The cement works had gone by 1896, the sea wall breached and parts of the saltings lost to the sea. This site was mapped from aerial photographs as part of the English Heritage: Hoo Peninsula Landscape Project."

http://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=1541788

According to the Medway Pilots site, there eleven cement works along the Medway by 1865. A beer house makes sense, as a cement works must have been a thirsty place to work, and bearing in mind, beer was a lot weaker then, and safer to drink than the water.

Wessex Archaeology's North Kent Coast Rapid Coastal Zone Survey Phase II Field Assessment Year's One and Two Report contains several references to the area in addition to Darnet Fort. 

Year One of the report can be found here: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/publications/north-kent-coast-phase-ii-year-1-2004/nkcphaseiiyear1-56750.02-jan2005.pdf

Year Two of the report can be found here: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/publications/north-kent-coast-phase-ii-year-2-2005/nkcphaseiiyear2-56751.01-march2006sml.pdf

All the references for the Darnet Island/Bishops Saltings are in year one and these included Roman salt workings, and references to the cement works and beer house, but also a Roman kiln...although things in the photos above don't look like the bases of Roman kilns.

Hope this all helps Ascoyne.
Posted by: Bilgerat
« on: August 24, 2012, 12:56:30 »

Don't know about the remains on Darnet Ness, but I do know there was never a pub there. There was, however, a pub opposite the end of Copperhouse Lane in Grench hamlet. There's a thread about that pub, The Mulberry Tree here http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=8486
Posted by: Admiral D Ascoyne
« on: August 24, 2012, 12:10:50 »

Hello,

I'm trying to discover what the remains were of on Darnet Island, there's two circular brickwork patterns beside the remains of a concrete wall and another structure within this.
There are remains of brick piers which I guessing would've supported a jetty/gangway to the structural remains.
Could these be remnants from Coppras work? I've heard comments there used to be a pub on Darnet Ness, although I can't find any evidence of this.
Can anyone help, please?
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