Industry => Factories & Mills => Topic started by: WildWeasel on August 12, 2008, 20:45:14

Title: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: WildWeasel on August 12, 2008, 20:45:14
My Grandmother was born in & lived in a Coastguard cottage at Oare ( she maintains ! ) & says she remembers this event... At her current age she would have been born in 1911 so its just about possible...My memories of being 5 are very limited but a major event like this may have stuck & I believe that a trick of our memory is that early events become easier to recall as we age...
She also talks of groups of children waiting alonside the railway line at Faversham where troops returning ( or going !) to the WW1 lines would throw sweets out to them... Fascinating but hard to extract the facts these days

WW
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: Ann G on October 31, 2009, 14:30:49
 Interested to see this, my only surviving aunt (aged 95) lost her father in this explosion, she lived at Throwley and her father, Walter Kerrison, was buried there rather than with the victims in Faversham. My aunt says that Lord Harris  paid to have him buried along with another local.
                 
   Ann G.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: bromptonboy on December 02, 2009, 15:46:06
Were there a number of munitions works at Faversham? I ask as a I have found reference in some government annual estimates of expenditure for costs associated with a gunpowder factory at Faversham.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: Riding With The Angels on December 02, 2009, 21:39:08
Were there a number of munitions works at Faversham? I ask as a I have found reference in some government annual estimates of expenditure for costs associated with a gunpowder factory at Faversham.

There are at least 2 further inland - Oare Mills (leaflet on page 1 of thread) are just off the A2 going towards Oare and there is the remains of one right in the town.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: Riding With The Angels on December 02, 2009, 21:49:12
Isn't there a pic or print of (I think) Reculver with the explosion in the background - not sure if its this one of the 1847 one (see new thread)?
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: oldsunset on May 08, 2010, 08:00:59
1st April 1916: Mourners attend a mass funeral at Faversham, Kent, for the victims of an explosion

anyone shed light on this ?

terriable lot of coffins in this photo must be over a 100 bodies

http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/3064005/Hulton-Archive (http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/3064005/Hulton-Archive)

Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: ellenkate on May 08, 2010, 08:12:52



See The Terrible Explosion April 1916,  at the gunpowder works -  on Faversham website:
http://www.faversham.org/pages/standard.aspx?i_PageID=15849


Ellenkate
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on June 06, 2010, 21:20:27
I was surprised the grave has been left to become so overgrown!
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/IMG_3508Small.jpg)

(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/IMG_3511Small-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: sheppey_bottles on June 06, 2010, 21:52:45
it could be that Dafs etc are being left to regenerate the bulbs before cutting. If you cut off the stems and leaves too soon you get blind plants the following year. Just a thought as it  looks like current years growth there.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on June 06, 2010, 22:34:23
I hope that is the reason, would hate for this just to be neglected!
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on October 11, 2010, 16:00:35
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/IMG_61211Small.jpg)

(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/IMG_6122Small.jpg)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: busyglen on October 12, 2010, 14:58:09
That's awful.  Just spotted a man standing there in the middle of it all, with his reflection showing in the water.  What with gunpowder explosions blowing up factories, and bombs etc. blowing up ships, there's certainly a lot of damage been caused over the years hasn't there?  Nowadays a factory wouldn't be allowed to open if there was the slightest hint of a problem.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: afsrochester on October 20, 2010, 19:33:39
The entire Cotton Powder Mills Works Fire Brigade were wiped out in the disaster.

  Fireman Stephen Epps, Fireman Herbert Foley, Fireman Stephen Vidgeon Sayewell (plus other names unknown)

                                                    "The Great Explosion"
"At 14.20 on Sunday 2nd April 1916, 109 men and boys were killed by an explosion at the Explosives Loading company factory, Uplees near Faversham. 15 tons of TNT and 150 tons of ammonium nitrate blew up when some empty sacks caught fire.

So great was the explosion, the windows across the Thames Estuary in Southend were shattered and the tremor was felt in Norwich. The crater made by the explosion was 40 yards across by 20 feet deep. the Cotton Powder Mills Company's huge factory adjacent to the Explosives Loading Company's plant was also seriously damaged. This was the worst disaster ever to occur in the history of the the UK's Explosives Industry. A brave attempt was made to extinguish the fire before it got out of control but the factory manager, George Evetts ordered everyone to leave the site when the situation became hopeless. However, the explosion occurred as everyone was leaving the site. Included in the (116) dead was the entire works fire brigade. Many firemen died in subsequent smaller explosions on the site. Many bodies were recovered from the surrounding marshes and dykes,  but seven were recorded as missing, most probally atomised by the explosion.

Many of the dead were buried in a mass grave at Faversham Cemetery on 6th April 1916"

Local Insurance company Fire Brigades attended together with the Army and many awards for bravery were announced in the London gazette about four years later.

Extract from KFRS Roll of Honour.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on October 28, 2010, 18:47:13
Building 861
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Building861Small.jpg)

Building 862
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Building862Small.jpg)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on October 31, 2010, 14:22:26
Remains of 842
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/IMG_61251Small.jpg)

Remains of 871
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/IMG_61261Small.jpg)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on November 03, 2010, 19:23:14
Three of the men killed during this explosion are named on the War Memorial at Chilham, all three men were buried in the mass grave at Faversham.

(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/IMG_7136Small.jpg)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on March 11, 2011, 22:40:26
Remains of building 878
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Remainsof878Medium.jpg)

Remains of building 844
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Remainsof844Medium.jpg)

Remains of building 849
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Remainsof849Medium.jpg)

Remains of building 866
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Remainsof866Medium.jpg)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: Wildfox on March 18, 2011, 17:08:49
Here is now the Grave of the Faversham Gunpower.

(http://i1128.photobucket.com/albums/m490/Wildfox48uk/SDC12997.jpg)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: Lyn L on March 18, 2011, 17:27:02
It's lovely to see the grave with all the daffs out. Thanks for adding it Wildfox and well done putting your first pic up.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on March 19, 2011, 22:19:05
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Remainsof858Medium.jpg)

(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Remainsof851Medium.jpg)

(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Remainsof870Medium.jpg)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on April 15, 2011, 13:44:07
Crater left behind after the explosion at building 218
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Crateratbuilding218Medium.jpg)

Crater left behind after the explosion at building 217
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Crateratbuilding217Medium.jpg)

Remains of building 884
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Remainsof884Medium.jpg)

Remians of C.P.Co. N.G. Plant showing buildings 213, 215 & 216
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/CPCoNGPlantBuildings213215216Medium.jpg)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: keith-17 on April 16, 2011, 13:13:38
I can see the Harty Inn (pic 2) :)
Did you go to this part? 
http://www.bing.com/maps/?v=2&cp=51.353543394905934~0.8733674883842468&lvl=19&sty=h

It looks interesting..

If you scan the picture to the right there are large areas full of water with remains of buildings near by , explosion area's ? maybe ?
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on May 12, 2011, 22:03:34
Remains of buildings 50,53, etc.. N.G. Power Station
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Remainsofbuildings5053etcNGPowerStationMedium.jpg)

Remains of building 251
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/RemainsofBuilding251Medium.jpg)

Remains of building 223
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/RemainsofBuilding223Medium.jpg)

Remains of building 222
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/Remainsofbuilding222Medium.jpg)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: Sylvaticus on May 12, 2011, 23:39:15
I'm trying to untangle a family tale that my paternal grandfather was present at this explosion. I see from a previous posting that there were 97 injured survivors, is there a list of their names anywhere? I have no knowledge of his being injured around that time and I do have evidence that he was working elsewhere two months later, and by the end of the year he was conscripted for war service. And how about uninjured survivors, were there any and if so is there a record of their names?
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on May 15, 2011, 14:25:54
Remains of building 885
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/RemainsofBuilding885Medium.jpg)

Remains of building 252
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/RemainsofBuilding252Medium.jpg)

Remains of building 220
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/RemainsofBuilding220Medium.jpg)

Remains of building 886
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/RemainsofBuilding886Medium.jpg)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on May 27, 2011, 18:50:25
Photos and documents are from the National Archives - http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on August 02, 2011, 00:46:53
EXPLOSION OF TRI-NITRO-TOLUOL AND AMMONIUM NITRATE AT FACTORY NO.7, KENT.

Accident No. 110/1916.

No. CCXVII.


REPORT
To the
RIGHT HONOURABLE THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE HOME DEPARTMENT
On the
CIRCUMSTANCES ATTENDING THE EXPLOSION, WHICH OCCURRED ON THE 2ND APRIL, 1916, AT THE
FACTORY OF THE EXPLOSIVES LOADING
COMPANY, LIMITED, AT UPLESS
MARSHES, FAVERSHAM, IN
THE COUNTY OF KENT
by
MAJOR A. COOPER-KEY, C.B.
H.M. Inspector of Explosives.


17th April, 1916.



Home office,
Whitehall, s.w.
17th April, 1916.

To the Secretary of State,
Home Office.

Sir,
I have the honour to report that in accordance with your Order dated April 3rd, 1916 I have held an Inquiry into the circumstances attending the explosion which occurred on Sunday 2nd instant at the factory of the Explosives Loading Company, at Uplees Marshes, Faversham.
By this explosion, the most disastrous in the history of my Department, no less than 106 persons were killed on the spot or died later from their injuries, and 97 were injured.  Of those killed 20 were employees of the Cotton Powder Company and 4 belonged to the military guard.

Description of the factory.
The factory at which the accident occurred was established in 1912 under an Amending Licence granted to the Cotton Powder Company whose works immediately adjoin.  The original purpose for which the factory was erected was the compression of tri-nitro-toluol into charges for shells, torpedoes and mines, and until the outbreak of war no other explosive substance was in use at these works.  Since that time, however, the management has been called on to fill shells and bombs with “amatol”, a mixture of tri-nitro-toluol and ammonium nitrate.

Circumstances of the Accident.
At about 12.10 p.m. on Sunday, the 2nd instant, it was noticed by Mr. Underwood, Clerk of Works to the building contractors, that a heap of empty linen bags recently used for T.N.T. and resting against the matchboard wall of building No. 833 had caught fire and was burning at one corner.  He at once gave the alarm at the office and Mr Palowker, the assistant manager who was in charge during the absence of Mr. George Evetts, the manager, at his mid-day meal, took immediate steps to deal with the matter by means of a hose and manual engine supplemented by fire-buckets.  These failed however to have the desired effect and by the time Mr Evetts arrived the fire had obtained a good hold, and he had to decide whether to make an attempt to save a disaster by removing a number of cases of T.N.T. lying in the immediate vicinity of the building or to order everyone to retire to a safe distance and let the fire do its worst.  After full consideration he decided that unless these cases were removed to a safe distance there was a considerable probability that the fire would spread to other buildings and that the consequences might lead to a disaster involving not only his own factory but also the cordite buildings belonging to the Cotton Powder Company, and that it was therefore his duty to prevent the fire spreading.
For over an hour water was poured on the fire without effect and at about 1.20 p.m. shortly after Mr. Evetts had given the order to retire the contents of the building detonated with appalling results to the crowd of men congregated around, very few escaping death of serious injury.

Damage to material.
Simultaneously with the explosion of this building the two final washing and filtering houses belonging to the recently erected nitro-glycerine plant of the Cotton Powder Company situated at a distance of about 120 yards and each containing a considerable quantity of nitro-glycerine blew up in sympathy, and about twenty minutes later one of the buildings used for moulding “amatol” charges, and after another twenty minutes a fifth containing filled primers for naval mines also exploded after having been set on fire by debris projected by the previous explosions.  Of these five buildings no trace was left, the crater formed at the site of the original explosion being no less than 50 yards in diameter and ten to fifteen feet deep.  A plan prepared for me by the management, but which I have not thought it necessary to produce with this Report, shews very clearly that within a circle of 225 yards radius drawn from the site of the first explosion as centre every building of ordinary light construction was totally destroyed, whereas outside that circle no building was completely wrecked although many of them were so damaged as to be incapable of repair.  In one of these shell-filling buildings erected prior to the war and situated within the fatal ring the reinforced concrete partitions were, however, not even cracked.
In spite of the fact that the buildings belonging to the Explosives Loading Company are well spaced at distances from 60 to 70 yards apart not more than three or four out of a total of about 30 escaped serious structural damage, but it must be noted that, with the exceptions mentioned above, all these buildings were lightly constructed of wood and were not screened by mounds.
In the adjoining works of the Cotton Powder Company the damage was widespread bit by no means regular.  In addition to the six buildings within the 225 yard radius which were totally demolished not more than five were so damaged as to be incapable of repair and a further five seriously shaken but capable of repair.  A very large number, however, amounting approximately to 150 to 200 received minor injuries or slight structural damage, a somewhat noteworthy feature being that the new magazines at the Harty Ferry extension in the extreme south-east corner of the factory area and therefore further away from the explosion centre than any other part of the works were more seriously damaged than the large majority of the intervening buildings.  It has been suggested as a probable explanation that the greater apart of the factory is built on a floating crust above the marsh whereas these magazines were on practically the only solid ground in the area.  As they were built right into the hill and well screened by mounds this explanation attributing the damage to the earth wave as distinct from the sound wave is very possibly correct.
So far as I can ascertain, although the effect of the explosions was felt many miles away, the damage outside the factory seems to have been limited to broken windows, falling ceilings, and removal of roofing slates, but here again, as is so usual in the case of a big explosion the wave seems to have been subject to no rue.  Faversham, only four miles away, escaped almost entirely whereas Southend and Shoeburyness at fifteen to twenty miles suffered considerably, and I am informed that 2 windows were broken at Farlow in Essex fifty-two miles away.

Cause of the Accident.
There is little to doubt in my mind that the original fire in the heap of empty bags was due to a spark from the neighbouring boiler house.  The three flues of this were each fitted with a spark-catcher, but this at best is of doubtful efficiency and the wind was blowing almost directly from this house towards the heap of bags.  It is possible of course that a workman had been smoking and had thrown a cigarette end of a glowing match on to the bags which, impregnated as they were with T.N.T. dust, would easily ignite, but having regard to the time at which the fire was first noticed, viz. just before the dinner hour, and to the strict regulations against matches and smoking which had only recently been emphasized by prosecution and fine, it is extremely unlikely that any employee even if he had so far infringed the rules as to smoke on the premises would have failed to take the precaution of completely extinguishing his match or cigarette before throwing it away.
The theory of spontaneous ignition of the heap of bags has also been raised but from the description given by Mr Underwood of the first appearance of flame low down at one corner I consider this an improbable explanation, although having regard to the period of time, about three months, during which these bags had remained undisturbed it cannot be entirely disregarded.  Lastly, it is not inconceivable that a mischievous person may have put a match to them on his way to the mess room, but in view of the fact that no one could have foreseen that the ignition of these bats would have had such serious consequences an unsupported surmise of this nature amounts at most to the vagest suspicion.  The arrangements for preventing the entrance of unauthorized persons appeared to me to be very strictly carried out and in addition to the military guard 128 strong, no less than 24 civilian patrolmen are employed at the combined factories.
All things considered then I am, as already stated, firmly of the opinion that a park from one of the flues of the boiler house offers by far the most probable explanation of the fire.  The boiler was situated at a distance of about 50 feet from the building against which the bags were lying, and contained three boilers, the flues of which were 37 feet high.  The spark arresters were of a type consisting of a succession of baffle plates against which the flue-gases impinged and were fitted in consequence of the former frequency of visible sparks.  In spite of these, however, sparking from the flues seems still to have occurred at times and only the night before the explosion two of the patrolmen reported that they had extinguished an incipient fire from this cause between the boiler house and the T.N.T. store.
Had the building contained T.N.T. only, it is probable that no explosion would have occurred but that the fused material would have spread over the ground and burnt away quietly.  Unfortunately, however, owing to the alteration in the loading arrangement, to which references has already been made, this building had for some time been used as a store for Ammonium Nitrate and about 150 tons of this substance were present in it at the time.  As the building was only licensed for T.N.T. the use of it for Ammonium Nitrate was, strictly speaking, a contravention of the terms of licence but, had the matter ended there, the substitution of a practically non-explosive ingredient for a compound which, although particularly insensitive to friction or shock undoubtedly possesses explosive properties would be regarded merely as a technical irregularity to be covered by an amendment of the licence at the first opportunity.  But owing to the excessive quantity of T.N.T. delivered at the works the magazines specially erected for the storage of this material were all full and of the surplus about 15 tons were deposited in the ill-fated building and the remainder appears to have been lying on the open ground outside it.  As therefore, the theoretically most efficient proportions of these ingredients are about 20 per cent of T.N.T. to 80 per cent of Ammonium Nitrate there were present in the building alone the makings of at least 75 tons of high explosive.
But although the management cannot be completely exonerated from blame for allowing this departure from the conditions of the licence, it must be remembered that at the present time rapidity of output is of the first importance, and from this point of view it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, strictly to adhere to the exact letter of a licence.  Changes are called for almost daily and have to be met in the way that appears best at the time with due regard to the essential matter of output.  This particular combination of ingredients even when intimately mixed to form Amatol, an explosive now commonly used for the bursting charges of shells and bombs, is regarded more as a fire risk than as an explosion risk, and it may well be that the responsible officials failed to appreciate the danger they were running in keeping these two ingredients in the same building or that appreciating the risk they considered it justified by the urgency of the national requirements.
That in moderate quantities a mixture of these two ingredients constitutes a fire-risk only would seem to be indicated by the length of time the fire was burning prior to the explosion.  In fact according to the evidence of the Works Manager it had passed its maximum fierceness at the moment the explosion occurred.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on August 02, 2011, 14:57:08
On first realising the serious nature of the fire the manager was placed in a most difficult position.  In the immediate vicinity of the building there was a large number of boxes of T.N.T. and it was a question whether an effort should be made to remove these and thereby possibly reduce the effect of any explosion that might occur or to let them be involved in the fore and order the workpeople to retire to a safe distance.  Mr. Evetts, as already stated seems to have decided, not hastily but with full appreciation of his responsibility, that in view of the proximity of the Cotton Powder Company’s Cordite Works and of the importance of these to the nation the proper course was to make every effort to limit the destructive effect of an explosion to the smallest possible area by removing to a safe distance all the T.N.T. that could be handled by the men at his disposal.  In this he was, I understand, loyally supported by his men, and although the loss of life is most deplorable it may truly be said hat those who thus died at their posts gave their lives for their country in the fullest sense.  Some of them possibly were unaware of the risk they were running as seems to be evidenced by the presence of a certain number merely as spectators who declined to retire in spite of repeated instructions, but many there were who, while fully appreciating the danger, threw themselves heart and soul into the struggle to prevent what could only be described as a national disaster, and it is some satisfaction to feel that their efforts were partially successful.  An examination of certain of the guncotton drying sheds in the neighbouring works shewed that a very slight increase in the force of the explosion would have caused more than one roof to fall on the guncotton on the racks below and the explosion of even one of these sheds would probably have put the cordite plant out of action for a considerable time.
The behaviour of the manager, Mr. George Evetts, calls for special mention.  At the time of the first explosion he was about 40 yards from the building and was knocked senseless by the concussion, his coat being torn off his back.  On coming to himself he found his offices were on fire and he made an immediate attempt to save his books and papers.  While so engaged the roof and walls fell in on him.  He then ran to the main gate to summon medical assistance and ambulances and there me Mr. W. E. Bethell, Works Manager of the Cotton Powder Company.  Accompanied by him Mr. Evetts then retuned to the site of the explosion which was now a mass of flames, and while assisting to remove the injured narrowly escaped death or injury from the second and third explosions.  After the last of these it was seen that the roof of the nearest magazine containing 25 tons of T.N.T. was on fire, and as by this time the scene was so terrible that they could get no-one to follow them these two gentlemen alone climbed on to the roof of this building and extinguished the fire thereby possibly preventing another explosion.  The gallantry of both these gentlemen deserves the highest commendation, more especially as a very slight addition to the shocks already experienced would almost certainly have caused the explosion of one or more of the guncotton stoves to which reference has already been made.

Remarks.
The immediate neighbourhood of the matchboard wall of a building appropriated to the storage of even Ammonium Nitrate alone was an unfortunate place to select for the deposit of a heap of inflammable bags but, without any way desiring to relieve the Company’s officials of responsibility rightly resting on them it is only fair to point out that owing to the pressure at which the work was being carried on and to the vast amount of material delivered to or stored at the factory with no regard to the space available or to the protests of the management, it was practically impossible to maintain the orderliness and method considered so essential in normal times.  No less than 250 tons of T.N.T. and nitrate had been despatched since the 1st February, there still remained a large accumulation of these.  This congestion is indeed a matter which is very generally causing me considerable anxiety and to which I have already called the attention of the Ministry of Munitions on more than one occasion, but in view of the immense scale on which the manufacture of munitions is now of necessity carried on it is difficult to see how it can be entirely avoided.
In view of the very large quantities of T.N.T. and Amatol now stored throughout the Kingdom this accident cannot fail to be extremely disquieting, but on the other hand it would be a mistake to assume that a fire involving either of the these materials will invariably develop into an explosion.  In the case of T.N.T. I think there is good ground for the belief that owing to its low melting point it would in the event of a fire spread itself over a large area and burn away quietly.  Explosions have occurred no doubt, notably those at Penrhyndeudraeth and Ardeer, but in each case the detonation was preceded by a fire of considerable duration, of the T.N.T. was strongly confined, or both these conditions were present.  Amatol also, or rather blasting explosive of the same composition, has been known to burn away in considerable quantities without explosion, but this is at the best merely negative evidence and must not be taken to imply that in very large quantities its behaviour will be equally satisfactory.
The circumstances attending this accident are curiously similar to those connected with an explosion which occurred at Witten in Westphalia in 1906.  In this case also a detonation took place in the course of a fire which fused the same two ingredients and thus caused them to come into contact, and it is to my mind by no means impossible that the conditions under which a large quantity of Ammonium Nitrate and T.N.T. stored in the same building might combine in the event of a fire might be more likely to lead to a violent reaction than if the two ingredients had been previously mixed to form “Amatol”.  In the present series of explosions at any rate, nothing occurred to prove conclusively that unconfined Amatol can be exploded by fire alone.  The mixing and moulding house which caused the second explosion contained at the time a considerable amount of unmixed ingredients, and the “primer” house which caused the third and last explosion contained T.N.T. in stout metal cylinders primed with pellets of “tetryl”, - and incidentally many of these cylinders were picked up later unexploded.
To ascertain if there were any probable foundation for the view that the unmixed ingredients might be more dangerous than the mixture the Messrs. Dupre carried out at my request a few tests in their laboratory but as they unfortunately have no open ground available, the scale on which they were able to conduct the experiments was too small to five any definite results an they were only able to show that when heated in a test tube, i.e., under slight confinement, “Amatol” is distinctly more violent in its explosive properties than T.N.T., whereas when ignited in a platinum dish the latter burns the more fiercely.  The pointed out, however, that Ammonium Nitrate when heated produces large quantities of nitrous oxide (N20) a gas which in its property of supporting combustion does not differ materially from pure oxygen and that although when the two ingredients are combined in the form of “Amatol” this oxygen equivalent would be consumed as soon as produced it is not impossible that if large quantities of the nitrate were separately heated there might be an accumulation of this gas which on suddenly coming into contact with burning T.N.T. might give rise to a reaction of unforeseen and exceptional violence.  It is also conceivable that the sudden precipitation of a mass of the nitrate into burning T.N.T. might produce a similar result.
In any case however it is clear that it is most essential to store these two materials in different buildings so situated that even in case of a fire involving both they cannot come into contact with one another.
I attended the adjourned Inquest held on the 11th instant by Mr. C. B. Harris, Coroner for the Sittingbourne District of Kent.  The jury returned a verdict of accidental death and acquitted the management of all blame in the matter, adding a rider suggesting that the Home Office should require more efficient fire appliances to be established in explosive factories.  In regard to this I would point out that the provision of ample means to deal with incipient fires is a matter to which special attention is paid in explosives factories but during the present emergency it is frequently impossible to carry out the necessary work of laying watermains ad that this had not been done at these works was due to no lack of effort on the part of the management.  In the absence of a high pressure water supply the best substitute was at hand in the form of a four-man manual supplemented by fore-buckets and over one hundred chemical extinguishers.
In the course of my Inquiry I received valuable assistance from the officials of both Companies concerned.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient Servant,
A. Cooper-Key,
Major.
H.M. Chief Inspector of Explosives.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: Blade on February 13, 2012, 15:03:36
Ok, here go's, please be patient with me if things are a little wonkey to begin with as this is my first attempt at uploading a picture on this site.
My Great Grandfather was killed in the Great Explosion at Faversham and he is listed as Lane. T on the commonwealth war graves commission website, I have tried to help update their records but the chap that deals with it has some personal health problems that prevent him at present in doing this so I am trying to give my Great Grandfather back his identity.
His name was Thomas Lane, he was employed by the explosives loading company and he is buried in the mass grave at Faversham, I presume because he was unidentifiable.
I enclose here his picture and the card showing the mass grave and two newspaper reports of the time.
I hope they are of interest.
(http://i558.photobucket.com/albums/ss30/Ravenhook_2009/ThomasLane.jpg)
(http://i558.photobucket.com/albums/ss30/Ravenhook_2009/Report2.jpg)
(http://i558.photobucket.com/albums/ss30/Ravenhook_2009/Report1.jpg)
(http://i558.photobucket.com/albums/ss30/Ravenhook_2009/Memorial.jpg)
Please forgive me if they are too big...I tried to keep the size down but I think it got mucked up.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kyn on February 13, 2012, 16:17:46
Thank you so much for a great first post, I hope you have found the previous posts interesting!
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: Blade on February 13, 2012, 16:32:21
Yes, I found the previous posts very interesting and informative, they have certainly filled in a lot of gaps in his story and I didn't know that there was still so much tangible evidence still left on the ground.
I am just happy that I have now been able to give him back his identity, I am not a Lane, he was my Fathers, Mothers, Father...now I have a rough idea about posting pictures I will endeavour to start a thread about my Great Great Grandfather, life in Cobham as School Master in the 1870's, I have some pictures and Diaries written by him.
Dunc.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: mikeatmanor on May 14, 2012, 17:34:22
My Grandfather William John Edward Gibbs was awarded a medal on this date, by The Explosives Loading Company.
The medal reads:- Presented to WJE Gibbs by The Explosives Loading Company for Distinguished Service, the reverse reads PRO PATRIA April 2nd 1916.
The story handed down is that on that day he moved a train of amunition threatened by a fire resulting from the initial explosion, but if there was a citation with the medal it has been lost.
Information on the cause of the explosion and the acts of bravery carried out by those lost their lives is well doccumented, but there is little information about those who survived.
Has any one any more information about this disaster.

Mikeatmanor.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: ChrisExiledFromStrood on May 14, 2012, 19:54:40
Searching google, there was one auctioned in 1998 for £100, described as
Quote
Explosives Loading Company, silver medal for Distinguished Service, 39 mm, obverse inscribed ‘Pro Patria April 2nd 1916’ wreath of laurel around, the reverse inscribed (Presented to P. Harris by Explosives Loading Company for Distinguished Service) hallmarked Birmingham 1916, good very fine £100-150
at this site:
http://www.dnw.co.uk/medals/auctionarchive/searchcataloguearchive/itemdetail.lasso?itemid=15511


and there's a story here:
http://www.thisiskent.co.uk/Tales-horror-heroism-Great-Explosion/story-15667862-detail/story.html

which says
Quote
Numerous medals were awarded for bravery in the aftermath of the explosion

Plenty more by searching
"Explosives Loading Company" medal
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: Gevets17 on September 30, 2012, 00:55:58
My Grandmother, who was 15 at the time of the explosion, was in service at Syndale House and clearly remembered the windows being blown in by the blast.

Although they knew at once it was the gunpowder factory that had gone up it appears that some of the staff feared it was a German attack possibly a shell from the sea.

She also remembered some of the less badly injured being bought to the house to recover.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: smiler on October 23, 2012, 11:19:53
(http://i1018.photobucket.com/albums/af310/smiler2/Images%20for%20Kent%20forum/scan0011-5.jpg)(http://i1018.photobucket.com/albums/af310/smiler2/Images%20for%20Kent%20forum/scan0012-3.jpg)

From "Kent a Chronicle of the Century" by Bob Ogley.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: HERB COLLECTOR on December 22, 2014, 16:55:22
The explosion was felt as far away as Norwich and was heard in parts of northern France.

The Great Explosion at Faversham, 2 April, 1916
Arthur Percival, M.B.E., B.A., F.S.A
Archaeologia Cantiana Vol 100. 1984.
39 pages with maps. Available online @ http://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Pub/ArchCant/Vol.100 - 1984/100-27 The Great Explosion at Faversham, 2 April 1916.pdf  (http://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Pub/ArchCant/Vol.100 - 1984/100-27 The Great Explosion at Faversham, 2 April 1916.pdf)
A good account of the explosion and its aftermath.
Note that the photos of the effects of the explosion posted by Kyn were still embargoed in 1984.

The entire Cotton Powder Mills Works Fire Brigade were wiped out in the disaster.

  Fireman Stephen Epps, Fireman Herbert Foley, Fireman Stephen Vidgeon Sayewell (plus other names unknown)


Fireman Stephen Epps B.E.M. survived and was able to give an interview in the summer of 1966.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: HERB COLLECTOR on February 13, 2015, 15:09:17
My apologies, broken link, here's the new one.
http://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Pub/ArchCant/Vol.100 - 1984/100-27.pdf (http://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Pub/ArchCant/Vol.100 - 1984/100-27.pdf)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: grandarog on September 30, 2015, 11:03:00
I have cribbed this photo from a long thread on Facebook. It portrays a group of woman workers from the Gunpowder works . Some people are claiming that their ancestors are pictured and were killed in the great explosion of 1916.Others claim that a lot of the women in the photo were killed in the explosion.This is causing some debate as the official figures etc show only Men and Boys killed.
Does anyone have any ideas .Was there perhaps a government cover up to keep morale up by hushing up the fact that women had been killed??
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: HERB COLLECTOR on September 30, 2015, 20:51:34
~snip~ Was there perhaps a government cover up to keep morale up by hushing up the fact that women had been killed??

Easily disproved.
From the link I provided 13-2-15, page 428.

"Miraculously, (12) no women had been killed or injured".

12. "Though no women were employed in the factory where the explosion occurred, many worked at the adjacent Cotton Powder Company plant, and in fact of an aggregate workforce of about 1,500 about half were women - see Syd Twist, Faversham 1900-1910, Faversham Society, 1977, (cited hereafter as Twist), 19. However, women did not work Sunday shifts (The explosion was on a Sunday, HC) at the CPC (Eileen English, Faversham 1900-1930, Faversham Society, 1981, 13-14)."

From 'The Great Explosion at Faversham, 2 April, 1916', Arthur Percival, M.B.E., B.A., F.S.A.
Archaeologia Cantiana Vol. 100 1984.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: conan on April 04, 2016, 23:42:39
Some very good news regarding the memorial

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-kent-35945274
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: HERB COLLECTOR on April 26, 2016, 22:11:43
Link to Lynsted Society article on the Faversham explosion of 1916.
Includes: censored newspaper reports of the time, details of six of the men killed, reports of prosecutions for carelessness at other times, newspaper reports of explosion at the works of Messers Hall and Co, December 1868. One of the four men who died from injuries in the 1868 explosion was Daniel Anderson. His grandson Henry Anderson was killed in the 1916 explosion. Official report to the War Office.
http://www.lynsted-society.co.uk/Projects/WW1/faversham_explosion/index.html (http://www.lynsted-society.co.uk/Projects/WW1/faversham_explosion/index.html)

And a reminder that the powder mills were dangerous even without explosions. Alice Post: a young mother who died of TNT poisoning at Faversham Power Mills 16 January 1916.
The sad details @ http://www.lynsted-society.co.uk/Projects/WW1/post_a/index.html (http://www.lynsted-society.co.uk/Projects/WW1/post_a/index.html)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: HERB COLLECTOR on April 26, 2016, 23:41:12
A eye witness account of the explosion from the Western Mail (Perth Aus) 24 November 1938.

The Faversham Horror.

Dear "Non-Com."
(The newspaper section devoted to wartime memories. HC) - After all these years of comparative forgetfulness, an article by "Donnachaidh" brought back the full horror of an episode in which I had to play a pathetic part.

The Faversham explosion was not caused by a Taube. The anti-aircraft battery was close to the house in which I was staying, and they would have told us had it been so, and warned my brother, and, as I was his nurse, he would have told me. It was caused by paper blowing across one of the burning dumps on the outskirts of one of the three large factories, namely, Harts Factory, Explosives Loading Co., and Cotton Powder Co. These covered several miles, and close up to the buildings came the muddy channels from the marshes, a desolate enough place without the added desolation of fire and death, a fire which might easily have lost us the war.

I was acting as my brother's nurse. He was invalided out of his regiment, and was manager of the first-mentioned factory. The house stood close to the gates.

Can you imagine that Sunday, a morning of wind and sunshine, and wives and sweet little children coming to spend the day with the men? Just a spell of forgetfulness of the dangerous work, of the week, work in sheds so sensitive that rubber boots had to be worn. One dared not sneeze for fear of the result.

I was calling the children to lunch when I saw six firemen march past to the gates. They were carrying the hose. I never thought it was anything but fire drill, but they never returned.

I was placing chairs at the table when I felt the house sway. Even then I blamed myself for fatigue, and placed no significance on the fact of those blue-clad men. Then came a sound merely of breaking glass and, on going to the window, I saw the servants from the lodge coming towards our house, with their aprons over their faces, and on the whiteness the worst red in the world -  that of newly-shed blood.

Then it all happened. The sun was blocked out with smoke, the earth rocked, and the sound of screams and crying children. Someone was commanding me to give first aid in a garage. The garage was being filled with chairs, and there were patients where there had been happy visitors. My hand shock so that I could hardly extract the wicked glass splinters from out the faces of those I knew, and loved and the holders of the basins were trembling. Each moment the order came to lie flat, and each crash seemed as if it must be the last. Little did we know that there would be nine hours of it.

Then came the traffic - all kinds of vehicles crowded the narrow road, full of nurses, firemen. doctors, soldiers, ambulance men, even the sailors, and soon there was a return stream going from the gates to Faversham. My mother stayed on in the dangerous home making hot coffee for the ambulance men, and those able to take it. She refused help from me, forbidding me to enter. I went to the children. Why, of course, there were children! Little helpless ones waiting for their mammies, who, in their turn, clung to those awful white gates and waited for their men. Someone said, "Take them away." Where to? Three miles to Faversham. How could we ride when all the cars were full of dead or dying men. I took the little hands, so soft and tender, leading them away from the lawn, and the wilderness of flowers, down the sides of the road black with terrible traffic and almost knee deep in dust.

These pink blossoms with the blue eyes. We moved so slowly, and their noses were bleeding, and they couldn't understand. One small boy showed signs of destroyed tympanium. I couldn't cover his ears to stop the pain. He might never hear the rest of that awful day; he might never hear again the birds sing. How could mankind inflict such harshness on these gentle little things?

Each crash was mercifully heralded by a great cloud of smoke, and I was able to warn the children to lie flat. The journey was very slow, owing to the congested traffic moving away the screaming and groaning victims, meeting those returning to the scene.

Can you explain the mad desire to obstruct the road in order to watch a scene of such agony? There were sight-seers along the route, and on the hills. Their cars should have been commandeered to carry those burnt men, instead of placing them on the backs of hard open trucks without covers, cushions, or mattresses, while others sit and watch, making the roads cul de sacs in some parts by their utter selfishness. Hostesses were at Faversham to meet me, and my poor little flock was taken to safety and comfort to wait for "Mummy and Daddy."

I took my small son to the town hall, and kind people looked after him, but there was no rest for me. The mayor sent me to get into uniform, and to go to the temporary hospital. My knees were shaking, and I wanted to cry more than anything. I was told off to make thirty cups of Bovril at once. A terrific crash and roar from over those hateful five miles had followed me, and soot came down the chimney filling the thirty cups. I will not describe the nursing, or what one sees in a hospital after such a disaster. There are so many of you who know, and those who do not-may they never.

But the cause of that disaster was not a Taube dropping a promiscuous bomb - THAT came the night after, when all the disaster was dormant. It was the paper that blew over the burning dump.

But-and here is a but, full of the ghastly possibilities of the havoc caused by a diseased conscience and a warped mine - what were three lads doing under a seat on a lorry carrying men to the factory at five in the morning, their pockets full of matches and candles? What was done with the lads and where did they go?

What would Mr. Schroeder do with these "tiresome adventurers?" What would you have done?

BUSHFIRE, Canning Bridge.




Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: Trikeman on June 28, 2017, 00:03:01
Anyone know where the epicentre of the explosion was - there was a large crater apparently
A few aerial pics of the site attached
Trikeman
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kentnavigator on December 25, 2017, 19:33:08
Small point, the Great Explosion 1916 did not happen at a Gunpowder Works. Faversham has a long Gunpowder manufacturing history but the Cotton Powder Company was set up to make Cotton Powder which is a form of Gun Cotton, the first High Explosive; following an earlier Gun Cotton explosion in Faversham the remote marshes at Uplees were chosen as a more suitable site for the works. It's sister company, the Explosives Loading Company was built alongside and it was their building 833 where the main explosion took place.   
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kentnavigator on December 28, 2017, 01:57:26
I have annotated some monochrome aerial photographs to show the location of building 833 where the main explosion took place.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: kentnavigator on December 28, 2017, 02:48:05
My 2nd attempt at a clearer set of pictures.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: davpott on December 28, 2017, 22:29:12
Anyone know where the epicentre of the explosion was - there was a large crater apparently
A few aerial pics of the site attached
Trikeman
[/quote

It is a good half mile to the west of 'Dan's dock' which is visible in your first picture. The dykes are basically unchanged which make it quite easy to locate using kentnavigator's pictures and Google GE.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: Trikeman on January 06, 2018, 17:27:33
Thanks
Will have a closer look next time I am over that way and get more detailed pics
Trikeman
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: Bensted on August 19, 2018, 09:34:25
My late mother worked in one of the Faversham explosives factories but I don`t know which one. The only clue I have is that some of "the girls" who worked there got covered in a yellow substance while working and she said that they were handling nitro-glycerine.

Does this give any ideas as to where she might have worked?
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: smiffy on August 19, 2018, 13:51:22
This could be tetryl, which was used in the manufacture of detonators.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: HERB COLLECTOR on August 19, 2018, 21:20:09
(......) The only clue I have is that some of "the girls" who worked there got covered in a yellow substance while working, (.....)


The Canary Girls and the WWI Poisons that turned them Yellow.
http://www.messynessychic.com/2016/02/17/the-canary-girls-and-the-wwi-poisons-that-turned-them-yellow/ (http://www.messynessychic.com/2016/02/17/the-canary-girls-and-the-wwi-poisons-that-turned-them-yellow/)
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: Bensted on August 20, 2018, 09:28:16
This could be tetryl, which was used in the manufacture of detonators.

In my ROF days (1960s) there were similar tales of Tetryl associated with ROF Pembrey.

Thanks for the reminder.
Title: Re: Faversham Gunpowder Works - the Great Explosion of 1916
Post by: HERB COLLECTOR on September 25, 2018, 20:36:25
Faversham, great explosion 2nd April 1916 memorial.
Roll of Honour with detailed information.
http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Kent/FavershamExplosion.html (http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Kent/FavershamExplosion.html)