Industry => Mines & Quarries => Topic started by: Maidstone Trooper on August 03, 2008, 15:43:57

Title: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Maidstone Trooper on August 03, 2008, 15:43:57
Intresting link here with reference to Tilmanstone Coillery, and the Aerial Ropeway.

http://www.dover.gov.uk/kentcoal/exhibition/tilmanstone.asp (http://www.dover.gov.uk/kentcoal/exhibition/tilmanstone.asp)
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Philio81 on November 20, 2008, 13:47:57
The company i work for is built on the grounds of the old colliery. All the tracks for the carts are still in place an can be seen all round the outside of the buildings and the remains of one of the buildings for the ariel ropeway system that took the coal to the docks is still around. Heres a link to some photos of it http://flickr.com/photos/weddingsinkent/sets/72157609014365278/. And this is quite a good site with info about the colliery http://www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/sites/t/tilmanstone_colliery/index1.shtml
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Roob Itself on February 07, 2009, 21:43:08
Ok Looking into the ariel ropeway. Supposidly the only surviving accessable thing is the engine room that used to drive it whihc is situated half way between the cliffs and tilmanstone colliery.

www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/stations/s/staple/index.shtml

Its at the bottom of the page but im looking into it now.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Roob Itself on February 08, 2009, 22:54:47
Ok found a good site with photos of the winding shed.

http://flickr.com/photos/weddingsinkent/sets/72157609014365278/
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Roob Itself on February 08, 2009, 23:13:03
Heres the location i found.

(http://img186.imageshack.us/img186/7086/arielropewayengineshedpu8.jpg) (http://www.imagehosting.com/)
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Philio81 on April 03, 2009, 20:59:41
Heres what remains of colliery that ive found. Not sure what else there is still about
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn70/philio1981/Tilmanstone%20Coliery/160320091789.jpg)
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn70/philio1981/Tilmanstone%20Coliery/160320091788.jpg)
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn70/philio1981/Tilmanstone%20Coliery/160320091787.jpg)
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn70/philio1981/Tilmanstone%20Coliery/160320091785.jpg)

Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: TowerWill on December 05, 2009, 20:07:45
In the late 1970's i was a freight train guard working trains from Shepherdswell to Tilmanstone Colliery on what remained of the East Kent Light Railway.We refered to it as "going out the Klondike".After collecting the required amount of empty wagons from the Long sidings at Shepherdswell it was off around the corner and down to Timanstone.There were no signals, but the "staff" gave us permission to travel on the line.This "staff" was just a bit of wood with a metal label,to be collected from and returned to Shepherdswell signal box.

The train formation going to the pit was usually loco,brakevan and empty wagons.After a careful crossing of the first road ,the driver would take us at bicycle speed through Golgotha tunnel and down to the Eythorne road crossing.If all clear it was across and down to the run-round near the colliery.I would climb down at the top end and when the train was clear of the points wave the red light or give hand signals.The secondman uncoupled the loco and changed the points after the driver had pulled forward.Then back it came,over my set of points which i then changed and forward onto the wagons which i then coupled to the loco.Grabbing the tail lamp i would stand on the loco step as we pushed forward.We would get the OK to proceed from the colliery weighbridge where each wagon was weighed empty and checked for any rubbish in it(nuisance if there was).I would sit in my brake van while the wagons were loaded from the bay with coal by a large tyred vehicle with a bucket at the front.When loaded ,weighed and labeled ,it was back to Shepherdswell.This time my brakevan was at the rear with tail lamp showing.More shunting at Shepherdswell then back to Tilmanstone with the next trip.  
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: unfairytale on March 07, 2010, 12:13:10
1984 During the Miners strike.
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2731/4413622966_a201d30b4a.jpg)
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: unfairytale on March 07, 2010, 12:27:00
Tilmanstone Male Voice Choir, led by Stan Stone with his accordion.
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4012/4413654166_047c96ceba.jpg)
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Islesy on March 07, 2010, 18:32:53
Sadly, the 'divide station' and power station for the aerial ropeway at East Langdon are the last remains of colliery buildings at Tilmanstone. The aerial ropeway was built by Dorman Long to break the stranglehold that the East Kent Light Railway had on coal transport from Tilmanstone, and was opened between Tilmanstone Colliery and East Langdon on 12th October 1929 and the first vessel was loaded at Dover Harbour on 14th February 1930. Exports of coal through Dover didn't come up to expectations and the ropeway was little used after 1935. During the war the structure fell as there was no export trade and by the end of the war it was beyond economic repair and was dismantled in 1954 and sold for scrap.

As it was circa 1930.

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3059/3028388078_7718b69128_o.jpg)

Approaching Dover Harbour and the exit from the cliffs

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3051/3028388362_260f3825f7.jpg) (http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3032/3027553947_d07bd258e3.jpg)

And crossing the Dover - Deal railway.

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3074/3028388898_daf3244671.jpg)



Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Islesy on March 07, 2010, 18:38:40
And how it is now:
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3148/3028345224_cee29f800b.jpg)

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4015/4414438278_44a33bf9a1.jpg)

(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4029/4413660729_ae366e7c44.jpg)

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3200/3028347102_6e44966c4f.jpg)
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: unfairytale on March 19, 2010, 18:36:25
The preliminary sinking of the shafts at Tilmanstone began in the 1840s. Arthur Burr and Tilden Smith were the two mainly involved. Tilden Smith was the eventual owner and it was he who bought the land at Elvington, where the  housing for the miners was built, the miners themselves formed the Dwelling Syndicate and later built over 200 homes, this was around 1910. It was also Tilden Smith who thought-up the Aerial Ropeway scheme.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: TowerWill on March 19, 2010, 21:43:56
Can't remember if it's been discussed already unfairytale but were the Tilmanstone shafts infilled or just capped as i believe those at Coldred were?Something to do with not polluting the water table i think.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: unfairytale on March 20, 2010, 12:58:47
Tilmanstone in the 1950s with the gantry of the aerial ropeway crossing Pike road.
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2686/4447838262_7a20016fc4.jpg)

As far as I know Towerwill all the shafts were capped and not filled, Tilmanstone was very wet, and deep, That's why the nearby pub is called the High and Dry.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: ellenkate on March 21, 2010, 12:19:53


Hi Unfairytale,  you said:

"As far as I know Towerwill all the shafts were capped and not filled, Tilmanstone was very wet, and deep"

I seem to to remember when speaking to men who worked at Tilmanstone, and was there when the site was cleared, they told us that the shafts were all filled up with rubbish (and other things) when the site was cleared, perhaps this can be checked somehow?

Ellenkate


Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: unfairytale on March 21, 2010, 16:24:12
You could have a point. I was talking to somone about Snowdown who said that a load of stuff from the demolition was chucked down the shafts before capping, but it was 'unofficial'. A bit cheaper than paying for disposal when you have a half-mile-deep hole on site. He told me that if the shafts are filled then the site ceases to be a coalmine and therefore must be returned to the land owner as farmland as stated in the lease. Snowdown lease has over thirty-years left to run. I don't know about Tilamstone though. This information is secondhand... well third-hand now! :)
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: TowerWill on March 22, 2010, 08:02:54
All i can recall about a similar situation at Coldred Colliery was reading (possibly in the "Dover Express")that a planning application to infill the shafts was refused due to the pollution it could cause to our water supply.A wise move as we don't know that much about how the water seeps around in the chalk below East Kent.Something is done at A and then B dries up which has happened in the Dour Valley and elsewhere.Some naughty deeds may have been done at Tilmanstone then! Incidently i see the Elham valley Nailbourne is flowing like a good one again.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: ColinDealer1 on September 01, 2010, 11:57:17
Having been doing some research into all the Kent coal mines and especially Tilmanstone Colliery I managed to do abit of "digging" for information myslf. My own connection with Tilmanstone is that my father was a face-worker at Tilmanstone for 17 years until its closure, who had followed his father having worked there for over 30 years from a Bevin Boy and eventually retiring as an Overman. One of my uncle's (also my dad's brother) was responsible for the demoilsion of Tilmanstone Colliery. He has informed me that alot of the material was not cleared from the site and was disposed of down the shafts, possibly for saving costs with transportation, but also with possibly making it almost impossible for the mines to ever to effectively re-opened.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: LenP on October 12, 2010, 23:30:19
Picture from an Arthur Mee encyclopaedia circa 1925 (ish).

(http://i581.photobucket.com/albums/ss251/Lens35/scan0003.jpg)
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: LenP on November 15, 2010, 21:03:28
Unlocated, but I think this is also Tilmanstone. Again 1925 ish.

(http://i581.photobucket.com/albums/ss251/Lens35/Tilmanstone.jpg)

Also unlocated, but the Beresford seam at Tilmanstone was at 1560 feet, so probably as above at Tilmanstone.

(http://i581.photobucket.com/albums/ss251/Lens35/scan0002-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Philio81 on February 01, 2011, 19:15:30
wonder if anyone has bought the part of the site britlands was on yet
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: overman on February 06, 2011, 19:10:42
Quote
He has informed me that a lot of the material was not cleared from the site and was disposed of down the shafts
The Filling in of shafts is strictly supervised, the infill (rock) must not be more than 5 inches and the pipes that were used to pump the mine water out, and still in the shaft, had to be filled with "pea beach"
These pipes were 18" dia, Tilmanstone pumped out 13 million gallons a week
It was infilled, I was there
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: PG on February 06, 2011, 21:52:21

Thats a lot of water being pumped out Overman, where did it get pumped to?
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: dave on February 07, 2011, 07:42:19
An interesting point.  The Betteshanger water was pumped out near the north Stream between worth and Deal, also an enormous amount of water 24hrs a day.  hope someone knows the answer to Tilmanstone.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: overman on February 07, 2011, 09:56:23
There was a pipeline that ran from Tilmanstone to Betteshanger and then out to the sea near the Checkers pub.
Betteshanger pumped out 7 million gallons a week.
The pipe line is no longer in use as both shaft's are filled in.
When the mines were in production some of the water was used to wash the coal in the coal preparation plant.

Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: PG on February 07, 2011, 22:08:20
Did the water from Snowdown go the same route or did that go elswhere?
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: unfairytale on February 07, 2011, 23:29:49
Did the water from Snowdown go the same route or did that go elswhere?


J.P.Hollingsworth's book, Those Dirty Miners, says a million gallons of water per day were pumped from Snowdown Colliery into the Stour .
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: overman on February 08, 2011, 17:04:07
Yes at one time the water was pumped into the Little Stour but when the Tilmanstone line was laid it was fed into it
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: man-of-kent on February 08, 2011, 17:39:17
Yes at one time the water was pumped into the Little Stour but when the Tilmanstone line was laid it was fed into it
Does anything remain of that pipeline?

Derek
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: overman on February 08, 2011, 21:14:46
As far as I know the line is still in position but not used.
During the latter end of the life of the pits it was managed and serviced by Southern Water
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: TowerWill on February 09, 2011, 09:36:05
Doesn't the end of the pipe appear now and then from the shingle beach between Sandown and Sandwich Bay?I've seen it mentioned somewhere.Another thing i used to notice in my cycling days was orange coloured water running down the ditch next to Pike Road(think that's the name).I'll ask my partner's brother again about it as their dad worked at the brickette plant at Tilmo.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Roob Itself on February 26, 2011, 10:24:25
yeah i believe that pipe does exsist between sandwich bay and sandown. I had seen it couple of years back and wondered about it.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: ellenkate on February 26, 2011, 11:44:05

TowerWill:

Yes, there was orange-coloured water, I have seen it in the 1970s,  think it was near the junction of Pike Road and School Lane, Tilm.

Ellenkate

Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: TowerWill on February 26, 2011, 17:16:38
That's right ellenkate i used to see the orange water in the late '70's flowing in a ditch.I didn't notice anything similar down near the pit when i was shunting wagons etc.I haven't asked her brother about it yet.I thought the pipe might still be there Roob Itself.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: PG on February 26, 2011, 19:58:51
I can remember one day in the early 80's when some local lads took it upon themselves to block that ditch and water flooded right over Pike Road several inches deep. That was about halfway between the pit and Beeches farm. I can remember wondering then where the water was from.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: ellenkate on February 27, 2011, 09:26:12

I believe there is a lot of underground water in the Tilmanstone area, and some aquafors (not sure about spelling this), also which go into the water supply. 
Obviously there was a lot of seepage into the colliery workings which had to be pumped out all the time.

Ellenkate

Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: TowerWill on February 27, 2011, 16:26:16
The orange coloured water apparently was pumped out from the pit.I've been told it contained ochre from natural mineral deposits.When their father worked in the lab at the pit an attempt was made to see if water pumped from Tilmo was seeping back in again.To do this they added some sort of chemical dye to the water being pumped out but no trace was found of it coming back into the pit.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: ColinDealer1 on March 05, 2011, 23:56:22
Tilmsnstone was a very wet mine to work, possibly more so than all the other collieries in Kent. To prevent water from cascading down the shafts pumping engines were installed at various levels at Tilmanstone, to bring it to the surface. It would then be pumped into channels apparently alongside the Sandwich Road and eventually released into the nearby water course. The water would come to the surface boiling hot and would appear as a red coloured water, which contained iron oxide. My father who worked as a face-worker for many years also remembers other sources of water that were apparently ice cold and thought to belong to underground waterways. I have seen fossils from old miners who worked at Tilmanstone found even at those depths underground. I recall my father mentioning about them having do 'packing' of overhead holes in the ceilings of the mine, that were apparently huge fossilised remains of huge trees. I have quite a few stories that it was a completely different World down there!
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: TowerWill on March 16, 2011, 10:09:39
An old school friend was a keen collector of fossils and i can remember we went on trips to the Betteshanger spoil heap getting to it via Northwall Road in Deal.We never visited the Tilmo spoil heap though.It probably was harder to get to.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: ColinDealer1 on March 20, 2011, 17:54:06

The Tilmanstone Colliery slag heap is still near the old colliery site, but has been dug out quite abit and I've heard was apparently used to add to making tarmac for road surfaces. You can get to the slag heap, through an alley way midway along the left side of Pike Road at the industrial estate.

Further to an earlier comment made about the red water having been seen at the old Tilmanstone Colliery site, it was iron ore deposits that found its way into the water beneath that whole area of the east coast of Kent. One of the former colliery owners, Richard Tilden Smith, did want to develop this area of Kent to also extract large sources of iron ore, along with cement works and other factories, which would have all been transported abroad using the old aerial ropeway. I have recently been informed by a former Tilmanstone Colliery Deputy, that the water that was pumped out of the shafts was in fact held in a massive reservoir on the site of the colliery and at one time had been allowed to then drain into the local water system, until the National Water Board finally identified it may cause a problem with the local water supplies. At one time the colliery was discharging more than 1000 gallons of water per day into the reservoir, which can actually been seen from one of the aerial photos added on page 3, situated adjacent to Pike Road.

Another thing I heard is that there is in fact an enormous underground lake thousands of feet beneath the area of Tilmanstone, which was apparently the cause of so much water and many of the fatal floods that occurred at the colliery over the years. I have heard a few people comment on geologists having visited Tilmanstone and did tests to identify how large and far the area of water covered. Reports were given that a chemical used at the colliery was apparently found with underground traces as far as Germany!






Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Andyb on March 20, 2011, 20:58:09

Another thing I heard is that there is in fact an enormous underground lake thousands of feet beneath the area of Tilmanstone, which was apparently the cause of so much water and many of the fatal floods that occurred at the colliery over the years. I have heard a few people comment on geologists having visited Tilmanstone and did tests to identify how large and far the area of water covered. Reports were given that a chemical used at the colliery was apparently found with underground traces as far as Germany!


My now late father also told me about this underground water supply as one of his responsibilities at Charrington's Brewery in Walmer, Deal, as a Plant engineer, was to check the flow rate of the brewery well. I can't remember the figures but the level in the bore hole was measured before and during the pump being turned on and the level would hardly change indicating a massive water supply. The well was sealed when housing was built on the site.
I too would like to know more about this underground stream, maybe i need to start another thread.

Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: ColinDealer1 on March 21, 2011, 14:52:53

I am researching into the old Tilmanstone Colliery and have heard quite a few comments made about these underground water reservoirs and lakes and is certainly worth a new subject thread. It was very interesting also hearing your comment on this matter Andyb. If you do create another thread for it then please let me know and place the subject title on here so I can find it.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: TowerWill on March 22, 2011, 09:51:44
My partner's brother has a rather amusing story of the days when rail lines went down on the slag heap.They were gone by time i worked on the railways.Apparently this chap who took bets for colliery workers was running a guard's brake van down the line when the braking gear fell off.As he careered past desperately winding the useless brake wheel,other workers were shouting out the bets they wanted placed to him.Eventually in the distance there was a great cloud of dust and a loud crash when he hit the buffers.Fortunately no injuries though.When i worked trains out there often my brake van would end up under a conveyor belt from which coal lumps would drop.No hard hats or safety boots for us guards back then.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: omega4040 on May 24, 2011, 14:51:38

Another thing I heard is that there is in fact an enormous underground lake thousands of feet beneath the area of Tilmanstone, which was apparently the cause of so much water and many of the fatal floods that occurred at the colliery over the years. I have heard a few people comment on geologists having visited Tilmanstone and did tests to identify how large and far the area of water covered. Reports were given that a chemical used at the colliery was apparently found with underground traces as far as Germany!


An underground 'lake' is a bit of a misnomer. The whole of Kent is underlain by the chalk aquifer, and deeper still the waters hosted within the greensand. The depths vary, but in effect the whole of Kent, indeed most of the south-east of England is underlain by a 'lake.'

I am a geologist and have had to research the former Kent mines a great deal for my job. I think a tracer chemical originating in Kent and ending up in Germany is pretty unlikely. I have spoken to many ex-miners in the area and often they will tell you the mines ran out under the sea. This was in fact not the case - I have a map from the Coal Authority which shows the former working areas and the closest was Betteshanger which worked an area just south of Redhouse Wall Farm.


Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: TowerWill on May 26, 2011, 08:44:20
Thanks for that interesting information omega4040!My old school friend was also aiming to be a geologist and i can recall how important his A level results were to him back in 1968.We lost touch after that.Your details of the water under Kent shows how wet these mines were.I suppose it also explains how in wet years the water used to jet out of the brickwork in Abbotscliffe railway tunnel and the Nailbourne streams flowed again.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Roders on May 27, 2011, 12:59:19
I went down Tilmanstone in the mid 60's with a group of lads. We had all just started in the coal industry and the coal board arranged a 'tour'!
The experience will stay with me forever!
The drop to bottom in the cage (the speed of descent and it seemed it was raining as we dropped)
I remember being told we were 3032 feet down...
We were shown some old workings where huge steel beams had been twisted like paper
The temperature was unbearable off the main 'corridors' - it was hot generally and in places very breezy..with hot wind being circulated
The dust!!!
The walk to the coal face - it was a long way and uphill
The face itself! loads of jacks holding up the roof - impossible to stand up - the noise of machinery
Then some blasting!! - i remember seeing what was solid rock appear to ripple (one lad was so scared he froze solid and was carried away and back to the top)
The MINERS - what great bunch of men - how they worked down there was beyond me and some of them were wearing just boots, shorts, belt, and helmet
We went back up and saw how 'Kent Fire' was made which was a sort of processed coal brick and then had a shower
It took another couple of bath days to get clean i reckon - my mother said it looked like i was wearing eye liner .....
I had borrowed some Tuff Big T boots from a friend (i thought my football boots wouldn't look right and i had no other suitable footwear) new they were a sort of sand colour - my mate was not best pleased when i gave them back!
Heath & Safety blah!!
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: TowerWill on May 27, 2011, 17:49:35
Gosh Roders i'm glad i just shunted coal wagons up top!I think my Mary's father worked on the Kent Fire process.Once during my short time as a coal delivery driver i dropped off a ton of the wrong stuff at one address.It was the stuff shaped something like a walnut.The home owner was not too pleased with me!
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: erfman on May 27, 2011, 23:44:22
this thread brings back some memories for me, back in 1973/74 i used to haul bulk loads of coal from tilmanstone to chapeltown, sheffield, to a coking plant if my memory serves me. :) erfman
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: TowerWill on September 07, 2011, 23:16:39
I was shown the death certificate recently of a poor chap who fell through a hole in scaffolding and plunged down the shaft at Tilmanstone Colliery.Death was by drowning and i believe the year was 1920 but i'm not sure about that.My partner's gran used to rent out a room at Eythorne for the registrar there to use.I understand the victim was a relative of my partner's family.It seems the registrar for that district had a garage business in the village in those days.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: kyn on November 25, 2011, 10:51:12
On the 14th January 1909 the hoppit at Tilmanstone Colliery was being raised at No.1 pit when the steam was cut out too early and an over-wind occurred, this resulted in the pulley wheel breaking sending the hoppit back down into the pit.  Unfortunately the men were working in the shaft at the bottom and the hoppit, which was loaded up and weighing about 3 tons, landed within the men, killing three of them.  The three men were R. Smesson, James Hambrook and Harry Arnold.  Officials rushed down into the pit within a few minutes and brought up the bodies of the three men, surprisingly the bodies showed no signs of injury.  The directors released a statement deploring the accident but they said in all other respects it was not a serious accident and no serious damage had been sustained to the shaft and fittings, work would begin again within 48 hours.

At the time the colliery was being sunk by Kent Coal Concessions Limited.  Two shafts were being sunk, the No.1 shaft, where the accident occurred, which is down to 922 feet, and Gabrielle Pit, which is sunk to a depth of 761 feet.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: ribblehead on October 10, 2012, 01:18:12
Hi Folks,

Few photos attached on Tilmanston Colliery Ropeway, would have dearly loved to have viewed all of this in operational days, quite a sight and most interesting.

Ribblehead
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: DS239 on October 27, 2012, 20:59:31
A couple of images from the 'web..
(http://www.miningartifacts.org/Tilmanstone_colliery1914.jpg)
A fairly common image, it shows the loco EKR no.1, the Fox,Walker 0-6-0ST in 1914.

(http://www.miningartifacts.org/TILMANSTONE_COLLIERY_-_EYTHORNE__KENT._England.jpg)
This one shows three of the seemingly photographically elusive 'Tilmanstone' private owner coal wagons on the left.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: overwallop on March 17, 2013, 09:52:26
Radio Kent gave a mention of this mine this morning.  I missed the actual content of the item but I thought I heard something about 100 year celebration and that maybe something is happening there today? 
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: TowerWill on March 17, 2013, 11:56:03
Mary's brother has told me that there is an exhibition today (Sun. 17/03/2013) at the Welfare Hall, Elvington in connection with the Colliery.
I believe the EKLR is running too.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Andyb on March 01, 2014, 08:47:39
Found an interesting short Pathe Clip of Tilmanston Colliery Ropeway

http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=6064.0 (http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=6064.0)

Andy
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: JohnWalker on November 24, 2014, 00:43:42
I've just found this photo of Tilmanstone Colliery taken by my late Father in Law,   Allan J Yates.  He took up photography in his retirement years during the 80s.   It looks like it was taken during the first stages of decommissioning  as I can't see any ropes attached etc.

Such a shame those pitheads weren't saved like the one in Wales - would have made a brilliant museum.

I though it would be nice to share.

JW
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: Alastair on November 24, 2014, 14:42:56
Nice photo, John. As you say, it looks to be fairly late on by the car approaching.

Alastair
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: kyn on February 05, 2017, 17:22:48
Dover Express - Friday 01 January 1937

Fatal Accident at Tilmanstone Colliery.

A fifteen years old haulage boy, Arthur William Moore, was fatally injured during the morning shift at Tilmanstone Colliery on Thursday. He was employed underground in No. 220's district, and was crushed by the moving tubs which bring coal from where it is cut to the bottom of the shaft. Moore was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. W. Moore, of "Hoyland" Ashley. All men ceased work, as is usual in the case of a fatality.

Grave found at All Saints, Waldershare.
Title: Re: Tilmanstone Colliery, Dover
Post by: DS239 on September 28, 2017, 16:56:01
The NCB Hunslet Diesel Loco at Tilmanstone