Military => Military Personnel => Topic started by: kyn on May 30, 2008, 23:42:13

Title: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on May 30, 2008, 23:42:13
Sidney Bernard (1818-1845)

Volunteer Surgeon on HMS Elclair for Royal Navy.

In 1845 after serving on anti-slavery duty off west Africa, where crew members contracted a very virulent form of Yellow Fever through which the Captain, Surgeon and Assistant Surgeon had died, the HMS Eclair returned via Madeira to England.  On arriving at Madeira Mr Sidney Bernard, hearing of the crew's plight and also returning to England on another ship, the Rolla, volunteered instead to serve on the Eclair and was appointed Temporary Surgeon.  

The fever-ridden Eclair arrived at the quarantine station, Burntwick Island in the Medway Estuary, on 2nd October 1845.  Bernard was taken ill on the 3rd and died on the 9th October 1845, by which time 74 officers and men out of a compliment of 146 had died.  

This brave, unselfish man was interred on Burntwick Island, his grave being marked by an upright headstone reading "Sacred to the memory of Sidney Bernard, L/Surgeon, R.N. and son of the late William Bernard of Knocklyon House, County Dublin, who departed this life the 9th October 1845, on board HMS Eclair whilst performing quaratine at stangate Creek aged 27."  

The headstone later fell and was broken.  It was repaired and then set in concrete horizontally over the grave, with iron railings erected around it.  A bronze memorial tablet set in oak was also fixed to the railings.  This was rediscovered in the mud in the 1950's and housed in R.N. Hospital, Chatham, as it was then.  The lonely grave is rapidly disappearing from sight in the mud of the island and now only the railings are visable at low tide.

Here is a pic of a map i found with the quarantine station marked at Stangate Creek.  Sorry about the quality.
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/IMG_2085Small.jpg)
Title: Surgeon, Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on July 27, 2008, 20:04:13
02 Oct. , 1845 , ?CLAIR (1811), paddle sloop, returning from West Africa, sent to Stangate Creek, rife with yellow fever; 74 deaths out of 146 crew. Surgeon Sidney Bernard of the ROLLA (1829), brig-sloop, volunteered his services, but he also died a week later.
Title: Surgeon, Sidney Bernard
Post by: Jason on May 07, 2010, 19:04:23
Sidney Bernard (1818-1845)

Volunteer Surgeon on HMS Elclair for Royal Navy.

In 1845 after serving on anti-slavery duty off west Africa, where crew members contracted a very virulent form of Yellow Fever through which the Captain, Surgeon and Assistant Surgeon had died, the HMS Eclair returned via Madeira to England.  On arriving at Madeira Mr Sidney Bernard, hearing of the crew's plight and also returning to England on another ship, the Rolla, volunteered instead to serve on the Eclair and was appointed Temporary Surgeon. 

The fever-ridden
Eclair arrived at the quarantine station, Burntwick Island in the Medway Estuary, on 2nd October 1845.  Bernard was taken ill on the 3rd and died on the 9th October 1845, by which time 74 officers and men out of a compliment of 146 had died. 

This brave, unselfish man was interred on Burntwick Island, his grave being marked by an upright headstone reading "Sacred to the memory of Sidney Bernard, L/Surgeon, R.N. and son of the late William Bernard of Knocklyon House, County Dublin, who departed this life the 9th October 1845, on board HMS Eclair whilst performing quaratine at stangate Creek aged 27." 

The headstone later fell and was broken.  It was repaired and then set in concrete horizontally over the grave, with iron railings erected around it.  A bronze memorial tablet set in oak was also fixed to the railings.  This was rediscovered in the mud in the 1950's and housed in R.N. Hospital, Chatham, as it was then.  The lonely gr
ave is rapidly disappearing from sight in the mud of the island and now only the railings are visable at low tide.


Is there a photo of the grave anywhere?  I haven't been able to find one, and I can't see it on Google or Bing.

Cheers

Jason
Title: Surgeon, Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on May 07, 2010, 20:16:22
I have been looking for one too but have never found one, not sure who is likely to have one?
Title: Surgeon, Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on May 23, 2010, 18:29:59
Well....it seems Dr. Bernard was not a volunteer on board the Eclair!  A Dr. Mclure was in fact the doctor who volunteered on the ship and Sdney Bernard was appointed from HMS Growler on the previous doctors death!

Oh, and if you ask nicely I will post a photograph of the plaque that was recovered from Sidney Bernard's grave in the 50's  :)
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on August 22, 2010, 13:16:42
In connection with suggestions that Bernard volunteered etc., it was a Dr: McClure who volunteered early in September, 1845 for duty in ECLAIR and it was on his death on 21st September that Sidney Bernard was appointed from GROWLER to ECLAIR.
No trace has been found of any paper relating to the wording of the inscription over Surgeon Bernards grave.  From the wording of the inscription it appears most unlikely that the plaque was placed there by the Navy of by public subscription.
Cap B.172/45 attached shews that Surgeon Bernard was appointed to the ECLAIR from the GROWLER on 21st September, 1845.
??? Worth
HEAD OF RECORD OFFIC
E.
7 November, 1950.

It is requsted that all departments will remark on the proposal that the plaque in memory of Surgeon S. Bernard R.N., should be placed in the church at the R.N. Hospital Chatham.  The possibility of tracing any descendants of Surgeon Bernard as suggested by the Suptg. Armament Supply Officer appears remote.
L. B. Cramer
For HEAD OF MILITARY BRANCH.
9 November, 1950.

M.D.G. concurs in the proposal that the plaque should be placed in the Church at the R.N. Hospital, Chatham.
?????????
MEDICAL DIRECTOR-GENERAL.
15th November, 1950.
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on August 27, 2010, 22:04:59
N.L. concurs in the proposal to place the plaque in the Church at R.N. Hospital, Chatham.
2.   It might, of course, be argued that the plaque is the property of the descendants of Doctor Sidney Bernard, but it is considered that, at this date, any attempt to trace the family would not be justified.  As apparently the grave has been looked after by the Navy for many years in the apst, it is appropriate that its last vestige should be preserved on the wall of the R.N. Hospital as a minor Naval historical monument.

???
For HEAD OF N.L.
23 November, 1950



A bronze plaque in memory of Surgeon Sidney Bernard R.
N. (who died in 1845) has become detached from a grave on Burntwick Island which for many years was looked after by the Royal Navy.  Since the sea walls around Burntwick Island are gradually being washed away and the grave covered with mud, C. in C. Nore suggests that it would be appropriate to place the plaque in the church at the R.N. Hospital, Chatham.
2.   With regard to paragraph 2 of the report from S.A.S.O. Upnor alleging that Dr. Bernard volunteered to attend a case of yellow fever on board H.M.S. ECLAIR, and subsequently contracted the disease and died, Admiralty records reveal that it was a Dr. McClure who volunteered for this duty and it was on his death that Dr. Bernard was appointed from H.M.S. GROWLER to H.M.S. ECLAIR.
3.   There is no indication that the plaque in question was placed on the grave by the R.N. or by public subscription.  Strictly speaking, therefore, it is the property of the descendants of Dr. Bernard.  Since however, the prospect of tracing his family is remote, departments agree with C. in C. Nore's proposal.  The size of the plaque is within the limits laid down in Home Dockyard Regulations Article 919 and the cost of fixing it would be small.


4.   Submitted for approval to authorise C. in C. Nore to make arrangements to place the plaque in the church of the R.N. Hospital, Chatham.

L. B. Cramer
For HEAD OF MILITARY BRANCH
20th December, 1950.
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on August 28, 2010, 12:55:54
28 December,

Commander-in-Chief, The Nore.
Copies to:-   Admiral Superintendant, H.M. Dockyard, Chatham.
                  Medical Officer-in-Charge, R.N. Hospital, Chatham.
I am to refer to your submission 2366/638/14/50 dated 13th October, 1950, concerning the bronze plaque in memory of Surgeon Sidney Bernard, R.N. who died in 1845, and to inform you that the proposal to place this plaque in the church of the R.N. Hospital, Chatham is approved.
BY COMMAND OF THEIR LORDSHIPS,
(Sd.) Nigel J. Abercrombie.
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on August 30, 2010, 19:33:34
SURGEON S. BERNARD, ROYAL NAVY - MEMORIAL PLAQUE
(Admiral Superintendent, H.M. Dockyard, Chatham?s No.957/50
of 13th September, 1950.)

SECRETARY OF THE ADMIRALTY.
(Copies to:
Admiral Superintendent,
H.M. Dockyard. Chatham,
Medical Director General,
Medical Officer-in-Charge,
R.N. Hospital. Chatham.)

Forwarded.

2.  This plaque has considerable historical interest.  The outbreak of yellow fever in H.M.S. ECLAIR in 1845 is well known.  It caused many deaths amongst medical officers and other officers and men.  Doctor Sidney Bernard is reported in 'Climate and Diseases of the African Station' as having died in H.M.S. ECLAIR in Stangate Creek on the 9th October, 1845, which tallies with the inscription on the plaque.

3.  I consider that it would be most appropriate for this relic to be placed in the Church at the R.N. Hospital, Chatham and approval is therefore requested in accordance with Home Dockyard Regulation 919 for this to be done.  There is ample room on the walls of the Church for this tablet and its size is well within the limits specified in Home Dockyard Regulation 919, paragraph 3.

4.  A copy of a photograph of the tablet is enclosed.

Henry Moore
ADMIRAL
COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF
THE NORE
13th October, 1950
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on September 14, 2010, 19:27:50
12 September, 1950.
Admiral Superintendant,
H.M. Dockyard,
Chatham.
Surgeon Sidney Bernard, R.N.
Memorial Plaque.

A man living in Upnor recently found a bronze tablet that had become detached from a grave on Burntwick Island.  He was asked to bring the tablet to this depot as it would soon be lost in the mud which is gradually covering the grave.  The tablet is in the form of a shield mounted on wood and is inscribed:  "Sacred to the memory of Sidney Bernard, Surgeon of the Royal Navy, and son of the late William Bernard, Esq., of Knocklyon House, County Dublin, who departed this life the 9th October, 1845, on board H.M.S. ECLAIR, while performing quarantine on Stangate Creek.  Age 27 years.  Be ye, therefore, ready also for the son of man cometh at an hour when ye think not."
2.   The story of this grave and tablet is rumoured to be that a case of yellow fever came into Sheerness on board a ship and Doctor Bernard volunteered to attend the patient.  He, unfortunately, caught the fever himself and died.  The grave was looked after by the Navy for many years when, for example, H.M.S. ACTAEON, the old Torpedo School in that area, was in existence.  The sea walls now around Burntwick Island are being gradually washed away and the grave is covered with mud.  It was thought desirable to rescue this plaque before it was lost and it is suggested that perhaps some relatives of Doctor Bernard might like to have it if they can be traced, if not it might be desired to put it in the Naval Barracks' Chapel.

Sydney ?????
SUPTG. ARMAMENT S
UPPLY OFFICER.
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on September 16, 2010, 12:09:49
(http://i260.photobucket.com/albums/ii34/batgirlphotos/KHF/IMG_0742Medium.jpg)
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on September 16, 2010, 12:38:42
After asking around a bit it is suspected that when the Chapel at the Naval Hospital was demolished the plaque may have been moved to portsmouth.....
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: Leofwine on September 16, 2010, 15:56:28
After asking around a bit it is suspected that when the Chapel at the Naval Hospital was demolished the plaque may have been moved to portsmouth.....

Surely not Kyn!   Chatham Naval Heritage could never end up in Portsmouth could it! :-/
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on September 16, 2010, 16:01:13
Maybe this was a one off ;-)
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: seaJane on November 18, 2010, 12:25:02
Good morning all.

The bronze plaque from Sidney Bernard's grave is now in the care of the Historic Collections of the Institute of Naval Medicine at Alverstoke, Gosport, where it occupies a prominent position in the Conference Room together with a photograph of the grave site.

In the 1953 the Kent Oil Refinery, Ltd., later BP, named one of their Medway launches after Sidney Bernard, Surgeon, R.N. There is one photograph of the launch in the Journal of the Royal Naval Medical Service, but I haven't been able to find any trace of what happened to the boat itself. Does anyone know? (I've asked Medway Archives).

/>Regards

seaJane
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on November 18, 2010, 18:31:12
Hi SeaJane, thank you so much for letting us know what happened to the plaque  :)  It is good to know it is being looked after and is in a prominant position.
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: seaJane on November 22, 2010, 17:00:04
Kyn,

I had a great deal of trouble finding it myself although local knowledge here strongly suggested it was on site...

On my computer is a digital version of the photograph of the grave site but I can't work out if it's possible to attach a picture to a message on this forum.

sJ
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on November 22, 2010, 18:22:57
I wasn't expecting you to say you had a copy!  Unfortunately I have had to disable the upload function on the forum however if you go through photobucket (instructions here: http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=1494.0) you can add images to the forum.  If you get stuck please let me know and I will see if I can help!
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: seaJane on November 24, 2010, 23:28:17
(http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2007-1/1238976/HMSECLAIR.JPG)
HMS Eclair.

(http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2007-1/1238976/SBGRAVE.JPG)
Sidney Bernard's grave with background: the cement surround and railings were added later, at the time the bronze plaque was added to the grave because the tombstone was becoming worn and less readable: the wording was practically the same as on the stone. I believe the railings were an attempt to mark the grave more distinctly.

(http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2007-1/1238976/SBTOMBSTONE.JPG)
A closer view of the tombstone, derived from several stages of reproduction, so I must apologise for the dimness.

The latter 2 pictures were taken at the time when the bronze plaque was retrieved in the 1950s. If anyone recognises the Eclair picture I shall be glad to know, as the SBA who sent it to me forgot to give a reference.
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on January 27, 2011, 18:16:21
I must have missed this post!!!
It is so good tos ee the grave site after hearing about it for so long!  Thank you for posting the links  :)
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on July 29, 2011, 16:42:09
On the 13th October 1845 The Times reported that Assistant Surgeon Sidney Bernard was promoted to the rank of Surgeon, the report also confirmed his appointment on the Eclair.  The report also stated:  This brave officer, who nobly volunteered his services at Madeira, did not live to enjoy his promotion; he died of the fever on Thursday morning 9th October 1845.  Three days after this report the Times then reported that Bernard had volunteered to attend the sick in Madeira after the Eclair’s own surgeon died of the fever whilst on their way from Africa.  The report says:  When a soldier or sailor receives his death-wound in the service of his country, he is deservedly lamented, and his memory is embalmed in the tears of his country; but the duties of civil life, though less obtrusive and more humble, are not on that account the less meritorious; nor is it too much to say, that he who dies a volunteer in the cause of humanity to stay the pestilence of which he is the victim, is not less an example of true gallantry than he who dies inflicting wounds he is himself to suffer in his country’s cause.
Bernard was not the only man on board the Eclair who received a promotion whilst attending the sick on the ship.  Dr John Grant Stewart, Surgeon R.N., was promoted to Deputy-Inspector of Hospitals whilst aboard the fateful ship.  Also Dr. William Rogers, the additional assistant-Surgeon of the ocean who was promoted to Surgeon of the Navy.  Dr Coffey, late Assistant-Surgeon of the growler joined Bernard on the Eclair at the same time, he was to be promoted to Surgeon of the Navy after serving 3 years and once he had completed his examinations.

A report published on the 19th November 1845 states:
Not many weeks since the Eclair steamer anchored in Funchal-Roads.
The dread yellow flag drooped from her masthead.  A strange and deadly sickness had swept off two-thirds of her officers and men.  Her captain and both her surgeons had perished.  The wan, worn survivors, sought relief from the inhabitants of Madeira.
The Governor of the island deemed it his painful duty to forbid any intercourse between the plague-ship and the shore.  He sternly commanded them to weigh their anchor and depart.
The scanty crew of the steamer, already insufficient to carry on the duty of the vessel, were daily becoming scantier under the attacks of the fever.  The equinox was at hand.  In this pitiable plight, without medical aid, they were on the point of being compelled to put to sea, and cross the Bay of Biscay.
There chanced, however, to be at Madeira Sidney Bernard, an English surgeon.  This man and seven seamen, volunteers from English merchantmen, came forward and offered their services in taking the Eclair home.
It is needless to waste words in praising their noble conduct – a more signal act of cool disinterested devotion is not on record.
The Eclair reached the Motherbank; the fever still raged between her decks.  Many had died on the passage from Madeira; the pilot who boarded her in the Channel died, and the heroic Sidney Bernard, having accomplished the humane task he had assigned himself, died also.



The Times reported on 10th January 1846 that the Eclair had been towed to Woolwich to be refitted for commission.  The paper then went on to say “In connexion with this vessel we may state that, seeing in a weekly complimentary a statement to the effect that the property of the late lamented Sidney Bernard had fallen into the hands of a Sheerness Jew, we have made inquiry and find that such is the fact.  That not only Mr. Bernard’s but the effects of almost all of the officers who fell victims to the pestilence on board the Eclair, were, on the paying-off of that ill-fated vessel, delivered into the charge of a general dealer in Mile-town, without an inventory, nay, without the ordinary security of lock and key!”
It carries on to state that none of the items passed on to the dealer will make it to its rightful owners, the relatives of those who died who are now writing to try and reclaim these items.


20th April 1846 saw a report stating that a memorial tablet had been placed in a chapel of a dockyard (Portsmouth?) in commemoration of Commander W.B. Estcourt, of the Eclair steam-ship.  The paper also wishes that the admiralty does not forget the brave Sidney Bernard by erecting a suitable memorial to him.
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: HERB COLLECTOR on August 22, 2011, 22:53:02
HMS Eclair, ex Infernal.
31 October 1844  Departs Spithead for anti-slavery patrol off Africa.
Date? takes on supplies at Freetown Sierra Leone.
April 1845   3 men die of fever, probably yellow fever.
May             2 men       ditto.
June            4 men       ditto.
July             4 men        ditto.
August        13 men     ditto.
Early September. Docks at Boa Vista, Cape Verde Islands, claims not to have yellow fever. Shortly afterwards an epidemic of yellow fever erupted on the island, killing a third of its inhabitants.*
September    40 men die of fever. Including Commander Walter G. Bucknall Estcourt.
                      Refused permission to dock at Madeira. *
The following is taken from http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~pbtyc/18-1900/E/01536.html (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~pbtyc/18-1900/E/01536.html) A tip of the hat to the unknown person who did the research, includes full list of the dead as listed above.

1 Oct 1845. Has departed the Motherbank, in the Solent, for the quarantine grounds at Standgate Creek, near Sheerness. 23 are reported sick.

2 Oct 1845  is reported to have arrived in the quarantine grounds at Standgate Creek, near Sheerness, and the sick have been removed to the Revenge and Benbow, which are in ordinary (reserve), whilst the survivors and Kroomen remain in the Eclair. Subsequently the white survivors were removed to another ship from the reserve.

3 Oct 1845 Walsh, John, Master at Arms, died from fever.
3 Oct 1845 Hails, Thomas, Marine,  ditto.
3 Oct 1845 Langmead, Henry, Blacksmith,  ditto.
3 Oct 1845 another surgeon has fallen ill.

6 Oct 1845 FlitzGerald, william Henry, Sergeant, Royal Marine Artillery, died from fever.

9 Oct 1845 Assistant Surgeon Sidney Bernard, who volunteered his services to the Eclair when she was at Madeira, died on board the Worcester of the fever.

10 Oct 1845  Mr Saunders, of Portsmouth, the pilot who brought the Eclair up from the Motherbank at Portsmouth to Standgate Creek has died of the fever.

12 Oct 1845 Lieutenant Charles Augustus Isaacson died from fever.

16 Oct 1845 No further cases have come to light and the sick are reported to be recovering. The Griffon has been brought alongside, into which will be put all the traps and stores from the Eclair whilst the vessel is fumigated and white-washed etc.

21 Oct 1845 Assistant Surgeon Coffey, who also volunteered his services at Madeira will be eligible to be promoted to Surgeon once he has passed the necessary examinations.
21 Oct 1845 Surgeon John Grant Stewart who volunteered his services to the Eclair has been promoted to the rank of Deputy Inspector of Hospitals.
21 0ct 1845 Assistant Surgeon William Rogers, of the Ocean, who volunteered for the Eclair, and contracted the fever, is now recovering from the disease, has been promoted to Surgeon.

28 Oct 1845 all are now reported to be well and will be given pratique once the fumigation and cleaning of the Eclair has been completed by the Kroomen, who, it should be remembered, are still living on board.

31 Oct 1845 the officers and crew have been admitted to pratique.

11 Nov 1845 steamed down to Sheerness.

13 Nov 1845 paid off at Sheerness, the Kroomen having been discharged to the Minotaur to await a passage back to the West coast of Africa. The vessel to remain at her moorings with her hatches open for some time, with no shipkeepers on board.

3 Dec 1845 the Kroolmen had joined the Alarm, for passage to the West coast of Africa.

2 Jan 1846 has arrived at Woolwich.

Oct 1846 Eclair renamed Rosamond.


* The Wellcome Trust recently awarded a grant to the Wellcome unit for the History of Medicine at the University of Oxford for the study of Naval health and medicine in the Victorian period.
There is a useful news item @http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/news/2011/features/WTVM052418.htm (http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/news/2011/features/WTVM052418.htm)
(As usual, the period engraving used shows far too much headroom aboard ship!)

HMS Gannet (http://www.thedockyard.co.uk/Three_Historic_Warships/HMS_Gannet/hms_gannet.html), built Sheerness 1878 and now preserved at Chatham offers a useful size comparison to the Eclair. (I saw your question on another forum, seajane) being roughly the same size-1,130 tons with a complement of 139 men. (Eclair, 1,379 tons 120 men.)

Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on August 23, 2011, 11:05:11
Thanks for adding that HERB COLLECTOR  :)
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: seaJane on August 23, 2011, 16:09:48
Haven't been following up this thread lately - I should have done, as I would have seen Herb Collector's useful reply (thank you!). That list of the dead is terrifying, really: no wonder Sidney Bernard reported that morale aboard was bad (quoted in Alexander Bryson, Climate and Diseases of the West Africa Station, 1849).

I'm very pleased to know that HMS GANNET is of comparable size. I narrowly missed the opportunity to visit her the other week and am now more irritated than ever that someone took the matter out of my hands... but never mind, I can try again some time (in case you don't know, 'Coast' was aboard, filming a day in the life of a naval surgeon: programme broadcasting next year).

Kyn, I had missed the Times reference of 10th January 1846 but have been chasing the original story about what happened to Sidney Bernard's effects: this was reported in the Kentish Observer, but the salient issue in the Colindale Newspaper Library is too fragile to look at, and the Canterbury Archives copy is in store while their archives are refurbished. Hope to have some more news eventually, however.

I was started on that particular trail by this article http://www.jtrails.org.uk/trails/sheerness-and-blue-town/history?page=5 (some wrong bits of information are repeated from an old issue of Bygone Kent) and have been in touch with its author.

Finally, I was in the area on Sunday and hunting around the Chetney marshes, where by pure fluke I bumped into someone who took me as near as one can get to Burntwick Island without going afloat. I'll post a picture later.

seaJane
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: seaJane on August 23, 2011, 23:14:38
In the first image the camera on my mobile phone was zoomed way in, plus I am on sticks and was starting to wobble - hence the rather shaky look! More-or-less westward across Stangate Creek to the island, with Sidney Bernard's grave near the right-hand end.
(http://i1119.photobucket.com/albums/k640/seaJane/2011-08-20Kent4.jpg)

This is a general view of the area earlier on when I had cast too far to the west in my search for the right track. The island may actually be off the left edge of the picture here, I'm not quite sure.
(http://i1119.photobucket.com/albums/k640/seaJane/2011-08-20Kent3.jpg)
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: HERB COLLECTOR on August 25, 2011, 20:52:27
Where exactly is the burial place of Sidney Bernard on Burntwick Island?
I ask because there is a proposal to use Burntwick Island for non-hazardous landfill.
http://consult.kent.gov.uk/portal/waste-dpd/waste-options?pointId=1307111031009#section-1307111031009 (http://consult.kent.gov.uk/portal/waste-dpd/waste-options?pointId=1307111031009#section-1307111031009)
Consultation now closed, I only found out during a search this lunchtime.
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: kyn on August 25, 2011, 21:55:47
I don't think I have seen anything that shows it and as far as I know if the mud has covered it again it has no marker...
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: seaJane on September 02, 2011, 14:41:57
Herb Collector, I was told by the gentleman who was kind enough to escort me across private land to the shore, that Sidney Bernard's grave is to the right-hand end of the island as seen in the first picture in my last posting: I think that equates to the upper right corner of the island in the image on your link; there is a small oblong building there marked on the map.

The gravestone is flat in the mud, but certainly in the 1950s there was an iron railing round the grave, cf. earlier in the thread. I thought of using binoculars but it was straight into the sun so not ideal.
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: HERB COLLECTOR on September 03, 2011, 21:55:16
Thank you seaJane  :)
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: Twyfordbridge on October 02, 2018, 08:49:18
Is it possible to see the 3 photos submitted by Sea Jane below please. I can just see 3 icons for Village Photos. Thank you,
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: HERB COLLECTOR on October 02, 2018, 13:19:18
There is a recent, 2016, photo of Sidney Bernard's grave @ http://intheboatshed.net/2017/01/21/the-infamous-history-burntwick-island-as-told-by-rainham-history/ (http://intheboatshed.net/2017/01/21/the-infamous-history-burntwick-island-as-told-by-rainham-history/)
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: Twyfordbridge on October 02, 2018, 14:56:31
Thank you Herb Collector. I was aware of that photograph and that was the reason for my query. The photo you link to is undated but shared by intheboatshed in Jan 2017.
There is another photo taken in 2016 by Queenborough Rowing Club showing them placing a memorial cross at the grave...but the remains of the ironwork in their photo appears to be just short corroded rusty stubs in contrast to the fairly well preserved ironwork in Nick Ardleys photo.
I have sent Nick a message on Messenger and to his website asking when his photo was taken.

From the position of the chimney, building and trees in the background of both they appear similar although I am amazed that the ironwork has corroded way in such a short time between taking the photos........ unless there are two graves in close proximity?

Sorry I can’t put photos side by side for comparison but here’s a link to other recent photos
https://www.facebook.com/groups/269052736530087/permalink/770564749712214/
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: Twyfordbridge on October 02, 2018, 15:07:56
Photos together ....
Oops don’t know how they came out so large but you can drag them to see fully
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: conan on October 02, 2018, 19:46:33
I've shrunk your images down for you

(https://i.imgur.com/T5TsbXWl.jpg)
Title: Re: Surgeon Sidney Bernard
Post by: Twyfordbridge on October 02, 2018, 19:57:32
Thank you Conan. I have heard back from photographer of the bottom photo and it was taken 2012 or 2013. Seems incredible if other photo is same site and only 3 or 4 yrs later ...iron work completely  corroded away 🤔