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Ancient History / Star Hill burials
« Last post by smiffy on Yesterday at 22:52:50 »
Came across this report in the South Eastern Gazette from September 1852. By Commonwealth, I assume the reference is to the Civil War, although how the presence of chain mail and spears fits in with this is not explained.
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The seven fatalities of 19th March 1916.

Civilian.

Francis Amos Hall. Age 8.
     Buried Charlton Cemetery Dover.

Jane James. Age 37.
     Buried St Marys Cemetery Dover.

Edith Mary Stoker. Age 23.
     Buried Dover (St James) Cemetery.

The Dover War Memorial Project has further details of the above, along with a list of civilian injuries and a map of where the bombs fell.
http://www.doverwarmemorialproject.org.uk/Casualties/Civilians/WW1/SurnamesAtoM.htm

Military.
5th Battalion. Royal Fusiliers (City of London) Regiment.

Alfred Greig. Private. Age 30. Died of wounds 20 March 1916.
     Buried St Pancras Cemetery.

Robert H Melville. Private. Age 29. Died of wounds 28 March 1916.
     Buried City of London Cemetery and Crematorium Manor Park.

Frank M Roseberry. Private. Age 18.
     Born Manitoba Canada. Buried Dover (St James) Cemetery.

Walter Venables. Private.
     Buried Dover (St James) Cemetery.

3
Windmills / Tunbridge Wells windmills
« Last post by kms on Yesterday at 21:31:35 »
Some notes I've knocked up:

Tunbridge Wells windmills

As has been frequently the case, Coles-Finch didn’t manage to pull the whole story together, and relies on some of the detail from somewhat fading memories.  He mentions the two well-known windmills, but misses two other ones that stood briefly.  Two out of four isn’t bad I guess, and there may have been more.

Calverley Post mill.

The first reference to a mill on Calverley Plain comes from 1776 and 1777 sale notices.  The Kentish Gazette of 28 August, 1776 describes a mill as ‘newly-built’ ‘with the Sweeps, Boulter, and other Fixtures belonging thereto’.  A further advert of January 25, 1777 reiterates the same.  ‘Newly’ built in advert sales speak might not be strictly true, as an appearance on Andrews Drurys and Herberts Map of 1769 would suggest it was built at least a decade earlier.

A further advert of 24 June, 1783, reveals that the first Calverley Mill was a post mill, owned by Peter Sloman.  All of these advertisements do stress that the purchaser has the ‘Liberty to pull down and take away the said windmill at any time during the agreed term’.  One would suspect that the post mill wasn’t wanted, and was either moved, or succumbed to fire.  It is possible that the mill itself was moved to nearby Frant, just over the Sussex border.  It was replaced by the next mill below, a smock mill.

Calverley smock mill.

The newer mill on Calverley Plain was a smock mill of improved and efficient design, very much in tune with with a growing and increasingly affluent Tunbridge Wells.  A painting by Thomas Girtlin, reckoned to date from about 1800, shows a smock mill with a London style wooden ribbed circular cap, and a gallery to tend the sails.  It’s appearance would suggest it was perhaps constructed in the late 1780s or early 1790s.

From around this time it is in the ownership of John Warde, a very wealthy landowner, who also owned a big estate at Squerryes Court in Westerham.  In 1827, Warde asked a respected millwright, William Ashby, who was one of his tenants at Westerham to quote for a new cap, sails and brakewheel for Calverley Mill.  This expensive work would probably be required after the windmill was wrecked in a gale.

Occupiers come and go at Calverley Mill, but the most noted name is that of James Dadson.  Tragedy occurred in 1848, when one of his employees James Ashby was struck dead by one of the turning sails.

In 1857 the mill was advertised to be let, and was at this point reaching its final years. Martin Brunnarius, in his book ‘The Windmills of Sussex’ states that the mill was demolished in 1861, and the parts purchased by Richard Pratt, and used in the construction of a tower mill at Crowborough in Sussex.   The house converted shell of this mill still survives.


The two Culverden Windmills


A mysterious chap by the name of Colonel Wardle was responsible for the erection of two windmills on Culverden Down.  Not a lot is known about him, apart from his rapid wealth after establishing a brewery at Culverden.  The first of the two mills was erected in late 1814, and was announced as fully functioning and open for business in late January, 1815.  It is specifically mentioned that this and the later mill were built to ‘supply the poor and labouring families, with flour and beer at prime cost’.  The windmill was an immediate success, so much so that Wardle commissioned the building of a second in early 1815.  Both these mills were described as ‘public windmills’, and were almost certainly smock mills. 

In June, 1815, one of the mills was consumed by fire.. ‘there is great reason to suspect, that the mischief was produced by the hand of some incendiary, as a pocket book, containing about forty pounds in notes, which the grinder had left in the mill over-night, has since been found in an adjacent wood, robbed of its contents.  The persons employed in the mill, have been examined before a magistrate, but no discovery has been made.  The property was insured, but much under its real value’.

At this point, Colonel Wardle (perhaps upset or bankrupt by this episode) disappears.  In September, again 1815! The windmill (in the occupation of Nicholas Barber) and estate are advertised for sale or rent, by Mr H Ellis, Original Brewery, Tunbridge Wells.  It is not known if Mr Ellis was rival brewery owner, or had bought and renamed the one established by Wardle.

The history of the mill passes relatively serenely from then on, being advertised ‘to let’ in 1833, and a ‘first rate windmill, driving three pairs of stones’, ‘the present occupier wishing to leave due to ill health’.  The mill is mentioned briefly in an advert of 1857, and was painted twice by Charles Tattersall Dodd, probably in the 1850s.1860s, both pictures differing greatly, but portraying a smock mill.  It was probably taken down about the same time as Calverley Mill, the land much needed for development.  The windmill stood in approximately the back garden of 29 Culverden Down, and the whole area is unrecognisable now.
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Windmills / Re: West Malling Windmill
« Last post by kms on Yesterday at 21:27:35 »
I think the 1861 advert is the final nail in the coffin for West Malling windmill.  Selling it in parts is normally when the owner has got to the end if his tether!

Just to clarify:-
1841 - District description, no mention of a Windmill, but the enumerator records, in order  - New Barnes, Home Mill, Lavenders.
1851 - District description reads, "Part of Cannon Heath, Old Havens, New Barnes, Windmill and Cottages, Lavenders. Whilst indeed recording Francis Woodger, Miller, he does not record where he is situated exactly, just "St. Leonards".
1861 - District description as per 1851 including "Windmill and Cottages", but no Mill or Miller noted by enumerator. This implies perhaps the Mill was still there, but unoccupied?
1871 - District description, no Mill mentioned nor any Mill or Miller found by the enumerator. Assumption being, it's gone!.
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Windmills / Re: West Malling Windmill
« Last post by mikeb on Yesterday at 20:53:47 »
Just to clarify:-
1841 - District description, no mention of a Windmill, but the enumerator records, in order  - New Barnes, Home Mill, Lavenders.
1851 - District description reads, "Part of Cannon Heath, Old Havens, New Barnes, Windmill and Cottages, Lavenders. Whilst indeed recording Francis Woodger, Miller, he does not record where he is situated exactly, just "St. Leonards".
1861 - District description as per 1851 including "Windmill and Cottages", but no Mill or Miller noted by enumerator. This implies perhaps the Mill was still there, but unoccupied?
1871 - District description, no Mill mentioned nor any Mill or Miller found by the enumerator. Assumption being, it's gone!.
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Windmills / Re: West Malling Windmill
« Last post by kms on Yesterday at 19:40:13 »


The tithe map will reveal all, as it is mentioned in the apportionment.  But this will involve a visit to Kent Archives at Maidstone.

mikeb's reference to it being adjacent to Lavender's Cottages is very interesting, as the only buildings in Lavenders Lane are much nearer the town and marked 'Lavenders'.  It would seem that the modern day Lavenders Road is a renamed continuation of Windmill Lane, and the windmill probably stood in this area, much nearer the town.

OS 6" surveyed 1867, published 1870.

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General Defences / Re: Defences in Folkestone Warren?
« Last post by tredgett on Yesterday at 17:50:25 »
The photograph is of the old firing range which i have posted a link under Military training.I am not surewhat the earth banks are for .There is a trench which runs along the left hand side of the range which i guess may have been to provide safe access to the targets ?.
The little pyramid beside the railway line is used to monitor ground movement as the whole area is prone to land slipes.
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Training / Re: Folkestone warren used as training area
« Last post by tredgett on Yesterday at 16:36:32 »
Many thanks for the information as regards rifle sighting, we have found old pistol cartridges there in the past but I can`t remember whether they were ACP (automatic calibre pistol) or not, I am suprised that no-one has any information on the range but guess it could have been part of a "no go zone" during the war years .The clay cliffs above the Warren itself were mined and there is an old you tube video showing the mines being washed out with high pressure hoses after the war .The concrete beach defences were bulldozed into a heap where they remain to this day .
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Windmills / Re: West Malling Windmill
« Last post by KeithJG on Yesterday at 11:38:56 »
Have been trying to find out on maps about this Mill but without actually paying on subscription I can only think about this particular one which in itself could be something else?

The A228 road I know well as i travel down it to go to my Mercedes Specialist nearby and the road is dead flat no high or low parts so whether the location is in a part shallow valley where the prevailing SW winds blow could be the only reason for this actual location?
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Book Reviews / Re: Watermills and Windmills William Coles-Finch Part 2
« Last post by KeithJG on Yesterday at 11:19:26 »
Gentlemen, without prejudice and not taking sides, surely enough is enough? Agree to disagree because it is clear you have different views on the presentation of what I find is an interesting subject. Debate history by all means but please do not descend into personal insults, it does nothing to progress the subject, and, dare I say, brings this excellent forum into disrepute. If you must continue, may I suggest you do so non publicly by  PM's?
PS I am not admin, just a KFM addict. What would PC say!!!

I do fully understand what you have said and I agree 100%.......I have no other dispute with any forum members as they present themselves the same as myself, just normal human beings.

I knew PC personally as I actually worked at the College at Horsted where I gained my certificates for my trade. My workshop was next to his and I think I do know how he would have reacted?

kms came over to my post about the book and ridiculed it so everyone supports him?

I will no longer talk to him here and as far as doing PM`s, I wouldn`t waste my time or ink doing so. :)
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