News: In June 1557 Edmund Allin, his wife and five others were burnt at the stake, where Drakes pub now stands in Fairmeadow, Maidstone, for refusing to accept Catholicism.
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1
Life Writing / Re: My name is Alec. I'm a Kent lad.
« Last post by smiffy on July 17, 2019, 00:18:00 »
Can you remember where it was posted? If it was in General Chat then it might well have been deleted.
2
Life Writing / Help to recover information
« Last post by Signals99 on July 16, 2019, 11:51:28 »
Hi ,looking for help,is it possible to recover posts on the fourum?looking for 'lost brother 'posting
Ref Tony Gale who was drowned at blue town pre ww2 ,not to certain  of the fourum status now appears to be partially operating ,can anyone help me .
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Life Writing / Re: My name is Alec. I'm a Kent lad.
« Last post by smiffy on July 12, 2019, 13:25:27 »
I'm happy to give Kyn more time, but if she could just give us a brief update on her intentions for the KHF I'm sure it would be appreciated by everybody.
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Life Writing / Re: My name is Alec. I'm a Kent lad.
« Last post by kms on July 11, 2019, 19:44:41 »
I did speak to Kyn on the phone about a year ago about a troublesome member in here, who kindly was encouraged to leave.  Give Kyn more time, as the information on here is far too important to lose.
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General History / Re: Chimney Sweeps
« Last post by smiffy on July 08, 2019, 13:06:41 »
Yes, MartinR, and also listening to the crackles and pops as the fire took hold. Being a boy, there was also the somewhat perverse pleasure of placing a plastic figure of some kind (probably from a cereal packet) on top of a piece of coal and watching it slowly turn into a molten blob and catch fire.

As well as a coal fire in the living room, there was a coke burner in the kitchen, which i think must have been something to do with heating the water.
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General History / Re: Chimney Sweeps
« Last post by MartinR on July 08, 2019, 10:15:45 »
The two things I miss most about open fires are toast (particularly crumpets) and gazing into the flames seeing pictures.  As a lad in the Black Country we had coal files (not surprising, there was coal everywhere including a seam about 4' under our drive).  Toasting bread or crumpets over the fire on Sunday (with real butter melting on top) was a treat.  When we moved to Sheffield in 1965 we had to burn coke which was not as good for toasting (or gazing).  Later we used a gas fire for toasting: nice fresh hot toast but no tastier than under the grill on the cooker.
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General History / Re: Chimney Sweeps
« Last post by pr1uk on July 08, 2019, 09:00:17 »
I can't remember our chimney being swept every year, although i do remember that if you didn't bother there was a chance of a chimney fire. Would a log burner produce more or less soot?

Coal produces more soot but wood also produces a finer soot so will need cleaning if not so often.
Back in the day when you only had 1 fire in a house you had to use coal as you could bed it in at night we used to use damp tea leaves to damp ours down, then the first up got the paper out to cover the fire to get it back into life. Log fires today tend to be in houses with central heating and used as a romantic centre piece not as a single heating supple.
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General History / Re: Chimney Sweeps
« Last post by pr1uk on July 08, 2019, 08:34:24 »
I'm glad I can remember what it's like to sit in front of a proper coal fire. :)

People think it was romantic sitting in front of a coal fire what I remember the most was the draughts as open fires draw in air and the rest of the house being so cold beds were always damp. Up to the age of 9 we also only had gas and the lighting only worked downstairs so you took a candle to bed.
Happy days yes because I was young would I want to go back now, no way
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General History / Re: Chimney Sweeps
« Last post by HERB COLLECTOR on July 07, 2019, 22:57:24 »
Two more female chimney sweeps from Gillingham.

WOMEN'S SOOTY FACES

Chimney Sweeps Earn £10 a Week

It may be argued that to be truly domesticated in England, to-day, a woman must master many a job which was once definitely in man's province. Chimney sweeps, for instance, are scarce just now, as housewives have learned to their cost when the chimney starts to smoke and husbands are not available to deal with the trouble. So some of them have turned chimney sweeps. Mrs. S. Alice Allen, of Gillingham, Kent, was among the first to take to this profession and this is why and how she did it.
One morning she found her sitting room chimney needed a sweep and having tried in vain to get someone to do the job for her, she went out and bought a set of brushes so that she might tackle the work herself. And tackle it, she did, and so successfully that neighbours began to come to her to sweep their chimneys. That was the small beginning of the chimney sweep's business she and a friend set up.


GOOD PUBLICITY

Now the two of them sometimes do as many as 22 chimneys a day, earning 2/- for each chimney swept. "If we kept this up we could earn £10 a week or more," Mrs. Allen told me. She thinks hers is an ideal job. No, it doesn't spoil the hands if you do as they do and put cream on them and wear gloves. It seems it's a good thing to dab a little soot on your face when you go out to look for custom. Mrs. Allen says that "soot is the best kind of publicity because everyone looks at a woman with a sooty face."

A NEAT UNIFORM

Out of their first money they bought a bicycle and a uniform. The uniform is like a man's boiler suit--dark blue trousers and jumper, a dark blue overcoat and a peaked cap. There is an "L.S." in front of the cap, which stands for "Lady Sweep."

     From The Examiner (Aus) fri 21st march 1941.

CHIMNEY SWEEPING

New Work for Women

Because she could not find a sweep to come and do her chimney. 25-year-old Mrs. Alice Allen, of Gillingham, Kent, bought a brush and canes and did the job for herself, says the 'Evening standard.'
Neighbors saw her and asked her to do theirs, and in a few days she had a bookful' of orders and took her sister-in-law, Mrs. Olive Ward, aged31, into partnership.
Now they have enough work to keep them going from 7 o'clock in the morning till black-out time.
They wear smart peaked caps with luminous buttons bearing the letters "LB." — for Lady Sweep— trousers and overalls.
Their record for a day so far is 22 chimneys. At the same time they run a Joint household with two husbands and Mrs. Ward's two children.


From the Morning Bulletin (Aus) Wed 26th March 1941.
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General History / Re: Chimney Sweeps
« Last post by smiffy on July 07, 2019, 14:18:41 »
I can't remember our chimney being swept every year, although i do remember that if you didn't bother there was a chance of a chimney fire. Would a log burner produce more or less soot?
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