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1
Towns & Villages / Re: The Brook Chatham
« Last post by prefabkid on Today at 11:53:29 »
1967 Kelly's tells me 115 & 143 are listed as Parry F.C.S. do-it-yourself supplies.
You can just make out the name of Parry on the temporary banner.
2
Tramways & Railways / Re: Rochester Common
« Last post by Roseann on Today at 08:32:31 »
This is the full picture, looking across the site of the cattle market. The houses visible in the background include those of Davis's Square, long since demolished.

I remember going in the cattle market sheds when I was young they were then used for market stalls which surrounded the shed, it must have been near Hayward house in Corporation street built in 1823 which Watts charity has for the elderly .
3
Wartime Memories / Re: War time Railways
« Last post by Mickleburgh on Today at 08:25:43 »
Richborough as a train ferry (to Boulogne) was a WW1 creation solely for munitions traffic (reasoning, less handling, shortest route to the front). Various development plans were mooted inter-war but never followed through to any extent and it was probably considered too vulnerable in WW2.
4
Tramways & Railways / Re: Rochester Common
« Last post by Stewie on Today at 07:24:11 »
Interestingly there is an embankment carrying the double track Chatham lines between the photographer and the station, yet the station is quite prominent so must have been much higher (it was mounted on a wooden trestle bridge I think), than the Chatham lines?
5
Wartime Memories / Re: War time Railways
« Last post by Sentinel S4 on Yesterday at 19:14:39 »
I understand that the link-span was retained as Richborough was to be developed as a train-ferry harbour alternate to Dover. One of the reasons that the good Colonel pushed the EKR there in the early 1920's was the fact that there was to be an outlet for the Kent Coal field that he so ably served, as well as through freight from the former SECR at Shepherdswell (as if they would ever have thought to send trains along the EKR......)

Someone can confirm either way, Howard, as this site is such a repository of knowledge.

S4.
6
Wartime Memories / Re: War time Railways
« Last post by howard on Yesterday at 18:41:15 »
Please don't forget that the Port of Richborough was also a staging point for the R.O.D. as it was train ferry equipped and a great deal of the landing craft, etc. were built there.
Surely the train ferry link span etc had all been removed in the 20s?

I recently read a book by an ex steam loco driver who recounted backing his loco onto a long train of tanks on flat wagons on dark night, coupling up and then giving his loco a huge 'handful of steam' to get it going only to find that it took off like a scalded cat. Later inspection showed the tanks to be dummies.
7
Tramways & Railways / Re: Rochester Common
« Last post by smiffy on Yesterday at 18:27:20 »
This is the full picture, looking across the site of the cattle market. The houses visible in the background include those of Davis's Square, long since demolished.
8
Tramways & Railways / Re: Rochester Common
« Last post by Roseann on Yesterday at 16:31:45 »
This is a crop from a photograph taken probably in the early 1900's. The view is looking north from the Common (or possibly Corporation Street, if this was taken a bit later) and shows what I believe to be a part of Rochester Common Station. This is the only image I have found that shows something of the outward appearance of this railway station, which enjoyed a brief existence for about twenty years, closing in 1911.


Smithy, have you the full picture or just the crop ,I remember those railings being along Corporation street where the market was .
10
Wartime Memories / Re: War time Railways
« Last post by Mickleburgh on Yesterday at 10:37:59 »
As is said the logistical exercise of D-Day was staggering but it must be borne in mind that the process went on for several months and to some extent was ad-hoc at the delivery point. There are limits to what can land across the beaches and the capture of the Cherbourg port and the eventual breakout from Normandy were both behind the original schedule. Nor were movements confined to the major south coast ports, One reserve battalion of the Glosters moved from Devizes to Eastbourne for shipping D-Day + 9 but their intended vessel having been mined were embarked instead at London, surely then a high risk run through the still defended straits of Dover. The Bristol Channel ports dealt with the bulk of the vehicle and heavy shipments, as they had in WW1. There is a well documented account (Oakwood Press) of an American ROD based at Newport South Wales (probably the main  one) who had over a hundred locos stored on running lines in the Taff Vale. These eventually all moved to France but probably not until Le Havre was taken.

But the main thing to remember is that the whole shebang lacked today`s high-tec central control, it was triplicate memos, basic telephones, much greater degree of devolved responsibility, ability to adjust and improvise. Above all I saw it once described as a `Consider it done, Sir!` mentality, particularly as applied to the railways.
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