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Author Topic: Russian Submarine, River Medway  (Read 54995 times)

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Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #23 on: April 06, 2012, 13:00:58 »
Thats good news and I hope they manage to pull it off. I know maintaining and restoring historic vessels is hard and expensive work. I remember when Cavalier came to Chatham, she was almost completely derelict and it's taken more than ten years to get her the way she is now. It would be nice to have some regular updates on how she's doing.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline kyn

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #22 on: April 03, 2012, 13:31:31 »
I had an email from the guy who looks after her:

We are currently waiting to hear about an application/ business plan we made to  relocate the submarine in the Royal Victoria Dock in  London , there is a big push to redevelop the whole area around the  Royals docks (  as big an area as Hyde Park to Tower Bridge)    with a masterplan in the making , one of the the main things  being the cable car that links the dock with the O2  and they were looking for ideas to "re animate " the water so that people will be drawn to visit the docks   , as usual it’s turning out to be a long drawn out affair with lots of land owners, plannning,  dock authority,  etc etc all having a say in what happens.

In the meantime we are shortly going to press on with preparing the submarine for painting and try to work out a way to fix the leaks in the ballast tanks to reduce the list!.   

Once I hear any news I will  let you know

Offline ChrisExiledFromStrood

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #21 on: December 24, 2011, 13:54:57 »
There's another Foxtrot class sub just across the Channel at Zeebrugge, B-143, Foxtrot type 641 of 1960 according to the website at http://www.seafront.be/foxtrot.asp (in Flemish), open to visitors, along with a maritime theme park (museum?) and light ship. Which shows what you could do with a sub.

Offline kyn

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #20 on: December 15, 2011, 16:44:15 »
:(  I really hope they find it a new home, although I am not convinced they will.  It is in such a sad condition now.

Offline karlostg

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #19 on: December 15, 2011, 11:08:04 »
Submarine looking for a new home (Medway Messenger article)
http://www.kentonline.co.uk/medway_messenger/news/2011/december/15/russian_sub.aspx

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #18 on: September 16, 2011, 19:14:06 »
Had to do some afloat work on the river today, so took the opportunity to have a run past the Submarine. She is really in a very sorry state, with more holes in her than a swiss cheese. Took the following piccies:






Any Health Health and Safety Inspector worth his salt would have kittens if he saw the scaffold they've built besides the fin on the port side.

I've heard that scrap steel is worth nearly £200 a ton at the moment.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #17 on: June 23, 2011, 23:07:42 »
That would be down to her owners. Slipping moorings is very unlikely. More likely that she will sink and need to be raised, though I would hope that the river authorities or the owners of the moorings would insist that it was moved before things got that far. Old ships do rot surprisingly quickly if they are neglected. Even if they're not neglected, old ships need a huge amount of looking after - I see the amount of work the Dockyard puts into keeping their three ships up to scratch.

That russian submarine is a tragedy waiting to happen. Like I've said previously, unless someone with very, very deep pockets comes along, she will end up in a breakers yard being cut up.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

exopper

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #16 on: June 20, 2011, 22:11:01 »
As an occasional visitor to my tribal homeland, I am unfamiliar with much of the stuff on view daily, so imagine my surprise when gazing out from the SouthEastern High Speed train [you know, the one that stops at every station] passing over the Medway I saw the unmistakable lines of a very rusty submarine, which I guess is the Russian one discussed at length here and now appears to be in a very sorry, unstable state.

Has anyone considered that it constitutes a potential hazard to shipping, if it slips its mooring and is sunk by collision? Who would pick up the tab?

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2011, 21:27:25 »
Unless somebody with very, very deep pockets comes along, I don't hold out much hope that this boat is going to escape the scrap yard. Nice idea about putting her in one of the docks by the Ship and Trades, but unlikely to happen I think. The boat will need to be dry-docked for her hull to be repaired properly. Dry docks do not come cheap and I don't think there are any in this neck of the woods now. The docks (docks 5-8) off No1 Basin are now unusable, mainly because the caissons which formerly sealed them have long been scrapped and the pumps which used to drain them have been removed from the pumphouse. Also, if the boat is displayed afloat, the owners will be fighting a constant battle against the elements as the water in the basins is salty, so the area of the hull 'between wind and water' will be a constant source of concern.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

sweep1983

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #14 on: March 04, 2011, 12:23:09 »
She is really looking sorry for herself now, I really hope we hear some good news about her soon!

Do not quote photographs
I can see the sub every morning on way to work ( I work on Medway Estate). Wouldn't the local council be interested as another attraction? Maybe move it next to the Ship and Trades pub, as there is a disused dock there plus it isn't tidal? Or in the Chatham basin near Staples?

Offline kyn

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2011, 20:16:09 »
She is really looking sorry for herself now, I really hope we hear some good news about her soon!




Eddie

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2010, 15:49:12 »
I visited the Sub in Folkestone and was very impressed with the sub at that time. I also visited the sub at Chatham. If they were stationed in the same place it would have made comparing them easier. I remember that they were around the same length and were in service at the same time. The Russian sub had round hatches in the bulkheads while the English sub had more oval hatches.

The biggest difference to stick in my memory was the cabin for the party member. Apparently in case of mutiny the party member was able to lock himself into a small cabin, though I don't know how long he would have lasted.

The last time I saw the sub up close was a couple of years ago when I crewed for someone and we moored very close to the sub for the night. It was saddening to see such a proud boat crumble in front of your eyes. The outer skin has rusted though in various places leaving quite large holes in the outer hull. This is why the sub is healing, and to be honest once see water has been left between the skins for to long, the corrosion will be beyond repair.

All that could happen now would be for the sub to be pulled out of the water and made to look the way it did. It will never be able to go back into the water.

Perhaps a specifically built submarine museum may be an option. If other owners of submarines that are facing the same fate were to get together they may get lottery funding, or help from the Heritage foundation.

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #11 on: June 26, 2010, 14:29:12 »
This is a real tough one. It's always a tragedy to see such a vessel become derelict to the point where it's beyond salvage. Unfortunately, historic vessels and museum ships are subject to the same economic laws of supply and demand as everything else.

If you look at the state of the 'maritime museum industry in the UK' you'll see what I mean. Single vessel attractions find it difficult to survive unless they're either complete superstars (like Cutty Sark) or they're in the perfect location (HMS Belfast).

Many well-meaning attempts to save old ships fail simply because of economics and a lack of interest from the public. As previously mentioned in this thread, Chatham Historic Dockyard wouldn't be interested in it a) because they have no room for it and b) because they're really only in interested in stuff with a local connection. Chatham survives because they have three ships there along with a load of other stuff (like the Lifeboats exhibition) and can exploit economies of scale. Also, they have had to become very adept at extracting money from other organisations (UK Govt, European Union and the Lottery). Without those, it would have been forced to close long ago.

Sheerness Docks wouldn't take the sub also because I think, they would have nowehere to put it. Firstly, it's a working commercial docks and not safe for joe public to enter willy nilly and also because I'm pretty sure that their two dry docks are not big enough.
Like I said, a tough one.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

merc

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #10 on: May 26, 2010, 19:39:27 »

Glen

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Re: Russian Submarine, River Medway
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2009, 11:08:40 »
I can remember when this first came to Folkestone, and my disappointment that, by the time it left, I still had not had time to visit it. This a vessel of historical importance and would be great at Chatham if they could find space. I guess money is the major issue here. Could the Imperial War Museum not take an interest. If it could be moored on the Thames in Central London, say alongside or close to HMS Belfast I reckon they would be beating people off with a stick. Southend is not the most accessible of places and I think this may be the reason it failed to work at
Folkestone. Particularly as the harbour area was in decline at the time.

It was originally at Woolwich by the Thames barrier before it went to Folkestone and then Strood. I had a look over it at Woolwich. Another good place might be Greenwich by the Cutty Sark/Gypsy Moth. I have a horrible feeling it will end up getting scrapped unless someone can make a go of it soon.

Glen

 

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