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Author Topic: No.1 Smithery  (Read 11742 times)

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Offline Signals99

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #15 on: July 24, 2013, 22:59:13 »
Hello
Some of the buildings in that area, the old galvanising shop for one, were used as storage areas for low level active waste. As a health physics monitor, part of my duties was to monitor radiation/contamination levels in and around the designated areas.
After the yard closed and radiological clearance was handed over to private contractors, it must have been some task to decontaminate the areas affected to an acceptable safe level. But I'm certain that the MOD, as the responsible public body, fulfilled its obligations to the letter.

Offline cliveh

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #14 on: July 24, 2013, 12:33:17 »
A postcard of The Smithery c1905

cliveh

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #13 on: July 13, 2011, 00:10:25 »
Lots and lots if sections of cast 18" track was removed from the Smithery and other places around the site. Most of them are stored in the bowels of HMS Gannet, where they're used as ballast. There is a small exhibition of the narrow guage railway in the old Armour Plate shop, including details of the locos. Theres also sections of track still in place in No 7 slip and No 3 machine shop.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline cliveh

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2011, 09:16:18 »
The 18in railway could not quite do 90 deg corners, came close on occasion. , Sentinel S4.

Thanks Sentinel. I shoud've looked at the second photo before posting the first!  :)

cliveh

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2011, 08:52:29 »
They are conduit covers. Below them is a concrete trench that has the services in, phone, water and or gas. They use them where fast and frequent access is required. There were lots at St Augustine's Hospital and some of the ducts were very deep. The 18in railway could not quite do 90 deg corners, came close on occasion. The cross hatching on the iron pannels is so that when the trucks are people powered they can get traction as the steam and petrol/parafin locos used the rails. There were and, I believe, still are sections where you can see the narrow gauge inside of the standard gauge on a few cast pannels. I do not know the reasoning behind using these pannels but I imagine that there was much thought behind them. Regards, Sentinel S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline cliveh

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2011, 08:31:53 »
Thanks helcion. I wonder what these other concrete blocks with the iron sides are then? There seem to be a lot of them sunk into the ground around this part of the Dockyard:



cliveh

Offline helcion

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2011, 17:19:54 »
CliveH    -

No !      Apologies for not making it clear that the rail was cast in [presumably] cast iron, with a tread [for adhesion] between the rails.

I attach a rather inadequate photo showing a surviving 18" gauge ammunition wagon at Woolwich Arsenal,  standing on ex-Chatham cast track sections.

Iíll take some photos of the track next time Iím in the dockard, but three or four lengths have been relaid into the cobbles at the entrance to Anchor Wharf, just opposite the public toilets.

If I remember correctly one or two entrances to the buildings on Anchor Wharf have short sections of track set in the doorways.

Cheers

Helcion







Offline cliveh

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2011, 15:25:12 »
Helcion are these examples of the ng castings? Seen here used to block the entrance to the Saw Mill air-raid shelter entrance:



There is evidence of these in the ground near to No.1 Smithery

cliveh

Offline helcion

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2011, 08:24:37 »
Numanfan    -

Quote
Are those tracks running down the centre? Possibly for wagons to move the heavy stuff?

The Dockyard had an extensive 18-inch gauge rail system,  some of which was loco-worked.
This was in addition to the standard gauge system.

Many traces remain,  one of the shipbuilding sheds has a mixed-gauge weighbridge table.

Much of the NG track was laid with both rails moulded into a large casting.

If only the subject had come up a little earlier !    I was in the Dockyard yesterday joining the KINGSWEAR CASTLE for the Medway Barge Match  -  I could have taken a few snaps for you . . . .

Cheers

Helcion

Offline DaveTheTrain

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2011, 21:42:21 »
It is a pity, as S4 points out that the floor is incorrect. 

Ordinarily, the curatorial staff at CHDT work hard to get this sort of thing right, I can only guess that research was done looking at foundary floor pics which would have looked just like this (i.e. upto your ankles in moulding sand and dross).

On a more positive note, at least they have not recreated the scene found after dockyard closure in #1, when after a while it was noticed there was a large pile of Blue asbestos sitting nicely in one corner with a shovel still in it. 

One should not forget the amount of cleaning, and re-instatement work that has had to go into getting that building fit for the public and staff.   

ShotA

Offline kyn

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2011, 20:58:27 »
Some photos from 2008









Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2011, 17:00:36 »
I also agree with Kyn, but what is the mess on the floor? Smiths are not messy workers and would have had staff (boys and apprentices) to keep the place clean. I could not work in that mess of cinders and it gives the wrong image of a proffesional Dock Yard.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline cliveh

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2011, 16:52:05 »
Yes I'd agree with that sentiment Kyn.  :)

cliveh

Offline kyn

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Re: No.1 Smithery
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2011, 16:39:20 »
Personally I would call it semi-restored - but I am arguementative  :)

Thanks for adding the pics, its a nice building and has been neglected far too long!

Offline cliveh

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No.1 Smithery
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2011, 16:04:23 »
A few photos of the recently restored No.1 Smithery:

















cliveh

 

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