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Author Topic: Hubert Sidney Deggan Murder - HMS Marshal Soult - Chatham Dockyard  (Read 20855 times)

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Offline kyn

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Edward Thomas Kaine, on his oath, saith:-
I am a Regulating Petty Officer, Royal Navy, stationed at the Royal Naval Barracks, Chatham.
On the afternoon of the 19th January the prisoner was brought in in charge of an escort – he seemed a little dazed to me.  I saw no signs of alcohol.  I searched prisoner and found a message form produced (Ex. 10).  Prisoner was examined by Surgeon Commander Douglas.  When I put prisoner in the cell prisoner asked me what the stain was on the collar produced (Ex. No.11) which he was wearing when he was brought in.  Prisoners exact words about the collar were “how did that stain get there”.  After he was placed in a proper cell he said “why don’t they shoot me and be done with it”.

Edward T Kaine, RPO

Offline kyn

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Thank you for adding the picture and some info.  I wonder how long these stories carry on for after the event?

Offline smiffy

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My father was a crew member on the Marshall Soult for a brief period just a few years later (1939-40), so he would probably have known about this incident. Unfortunately I can't ask him as he is no longer with us. In fact, if he were still alive, it would have been his 98th birthday yesterday!

HMS Marshal Soult was a Royal Navy Marshal Ney class monitor, a shallow-draft armoured shore bombardment vessel equipped with two huge 15 inch guns. She was moved to Chatham in April 1926 to serve as a training ship. (Post modified 21/05/18)



Offline kyn

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William Henry Smith, on his oath, saith:-
I am an Able Seaman, No. J.98452, Royal Navy, attached to H.M.S. Marshal Soult.
About 3.30 p.m. on 19th January I was acting as escort to the prisoner from the Marshal Soult to the Naval Depot.  On the way prisoner said “I will be glad when the rope’s round my neck” – he was mumbling at times and I could not understand what he was saying.  He appeared to be rather “panicky” – he was sober.

W.H. Smith

Offline kyn

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Ralph Frederick Ward, on his oath, saith:-
I am an Able Seaman, No. J.115088, Royal Navy, attached to H.M.S. Marshal Soult.
About 3.30 p.m. on 19th January I was acting as escort with another man to the prisoner when he was taken from H.M.S. Marshal Soult to the Naval Depot on the instructions of the Master-at-Arms.  I noticed no sign of insanity.  On the way to the Depot prisoner said “I shall be pleased when it’s all over”.  He was muttering most of the time.
He was muttering to himself.

R Ward

Offline kyn

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George Wilfrid Barralet, on his oath, saith:-
I am a Master-at-Arms, Royal Navy, attached to H.M.S. Marshal Soult.
About 3.15 p.m. on the 19th January I was in my cabin and in consequence of a remark I came out and saw prisoner being held by the arm by another Petty Officer.  I asked what had happened and someone said in prisoners presence “he’s cut his throat”.   I said “whose throat” and somebody announced “that Chief Petty Officers”.  The person who handed me the Razor produced (Ex.8) was the witness Powell.  I ordered prisoner into the Wireless Office in charge of the Petty Officer.  On the Friday morning the deceased Deggan had reported prisoner for desertion of duty.  I took prisoner before the Officer of the day – and he told prisoner that he (prisoner) was in the First Lieutenants report.  Just before noon on the Friday I saw prisoner and told him he had to report to me before 9.30 a.m. on the Saturday.  Prisoner said “it’s my Friday while” which means long week end leave – that would be from 4 pm Friday to 8.30 a.m. Monday.  Prisoner appeared annoyed – and pointed out that week end leave had already been granted.  I explained to him that it was unavoidable as he should be on board at 9.30 as he had to report to me personally.  I explained to prisoner that his leave was not technically stopped but he had to be on board at the time stated.  Next morning prisoner reported promptly at 9.30 a.m.  At about 10 a.m. I took prisoner before Lt. Com. Noel.  The charges were read ??? to prisoner.  I produced the Charge sheet Ex. 9.  Lt. Col. Noel said to prisoner in effect that he considered the charge as of a sufficiently serious nature to go before the Captain.  Evidence was called namely the evidence of the deceased.  Prisoner did not dispute this evidence – but ??? some mitigating circumstances.  Prisoner was dismissed with a caution that he would have to see the Captain – ultimately I told prisoner he could carry on with his leave until the Monday morning.
I don’t remember Lt. Noel saying anything about be de-moted but he might have implied that.

G Barralet

Offline kyn

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John Henry Fallen, on his oath, saith:-
I am a Petty Officer, No. D.J.46742, Royal Navy, serving in H.M. Submarine L.71.
I mess in H.M.S. Marshal Soult.  About 3 pm on the 19th January and I was in the Submarine Petty Officer No. 2 mess.  Petty Officer Powell the last witness came to the door of the mess, he pulled back the curtain and said “give us a hand he’s cut the Chief’s throat”.  Powell was holding prisoner by the wrist.  I went straight across to No. 8 mess and I found the deceased C.P.O. Deggan lying just inside the door.  Deceased was lying on his left side with his left hand clutched under his head and his legs were extended.  I could see his throat was cut.  There was blood all over the mess.  There was an overturned chair roughly between the settee and the entrance.  I went out to try and get a Doctor and as I went out the Master-at-Arms was coming forward.  When I entered the mess, the wireless was on giving a commentary of the football match.  There seemed to be a trail of blood from where the chair was overturned to the settee, by which I mean the kit lockers.

J Fallen P.O.

Offline kyn

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Warning - the information that follows may be found to be upsetting.  Those with a sensitivity towards violent acts should not read any further.

Edwin Cross Powell, on his oath, saith:-
I am a Stoker Petty Officer, No. K.19547, Royal Navy, serving in H.M.S. Enterprise.
I have my meals and sleep on board H.M.S. Marshal Soult.  I was in No. 1 mess.  The prisoner is a member of that mess.  The deceased C.P.O. Deggan had his meals in the C.P.O.’s mess – about 7.30 a.m. on the 19th January I saw prisoner in the mess.  I also saw him again in the mess about 11 a.m. he came in the mess for his Rum.  He was dressed as if going on shore for leave.  He left the mess about 11.15 a.m.  After I’d had my dinner I had a sleep in the mess.  About 3 o’clock I was awakened by somebody shaking me – it was the prisoner – he said to me “I've done it Ted”.  I turned round and said “you’ve done what, what are you talking about?” and he said “I’ve cut that C.P.O.’s throat”.  Prisoner had the white handled Razor produced (Ex. 8) in his hand.  Prisoners name is on the blade of that Razor.  I took the Razor from him – his hands were all blood and there was blood on the left sleeve of his mackintosh.  I called in the Submariners mess for assistance.  I stayed with prisoner on the Quarter Deck until the escort took him into the Depot.  He appeared his usual self and he said to me “Don’t you worry Ted”.  He appeared to be sober but he had had some drink, he was fully dressed with a mackintosh on – he was pale – he was not excited when he came to me.  Prisoners clothing was not disarranged.  I gave the Razor (Ex. 8) to the Master-at-Arms.  The razor (Ex. 8) was blood stained.

E C Powell

Offline kyn

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GLYN CHARLES JENKINS, on his oath, saith:-
I am a Leading Cook, No. MX 45940, Royal Navy, serving in H.M.S. Marshal Soult.
About 2.45 pm on Saturday the 19th Jan I was at my locker just outside the C.P.O mess.  The prisoner came up to me and said “What’s a man with crossed torpedoes and a star” he held my wrist whilst he was saying that.  I did not follow what he meant – he asked me two or three times.  I said “L.T.O. I suppose.”  Which means Leading Torpedo Operator – and that is what the deceased C.P.O. Deggan was – he wore the badge of 2 crossed torpedoes and a star on his collar.  Prisoner then went into the C.P.O.s mess.  He came out of the mess before he spoke to me and after speaking went back into it.  I went across to me galley.
When prisoner spoke to me he was obviously very excited.

G. C. Jenkins

Offline kyn

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ALFRED HENRY BINFIELD, on his oath, saith:-

I am a Stoker, No. k/61647, Royal Navy, serving in H.M.S. Marshal Soult.  I am mess waiter for the Chief Petty Officers mess.  I have known the deceased man Deggan since I joined the ship in October last.  On sat(?) afternoon the 19th Jan ??? I prepared the table for tea.  I left about a quarter to three.  The wireless was on and a running  commentary of the ??? match.  When I left deceased man Deggan was the only man left.  He was quite all right and very jovial.  There is a mattress on the kit lockers in the mess.  When I left the mess the mattress was the shiny side up.


Alfred Henry Binfield

Offline kyn

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GEORGE DAGLEY, on his oath, saith:-
I am a Stoker, No. K/18595, Royal Navy, serving in H.M.S. Marshal Soult.  I am the tenant of No. 11 Nelson Road, Chatham.  The prisoner was a lodger at my house, his wife also lodged there.  It was his practice to have week end leave and spend it at my house.  He came home on Friday night the 12th 1am for night leave.  I saw him about 12 noon on the Saturday at my home.  We both went to the “King William the IV” for a game of Darts.  We generally did that on a Saturday afternoon.  We got to the “King William the IV” at ten minutes past 12 ad left at 2 o’clock.  Prisoner had 4 or 5 pints of old and mild to drink during that time.  That was what he usually had.  He appeared to be all right when we left the “King William the IV”.  We both went back to 11 Nelson Road and he went up to his room which was the front bedroom.  I did not see him after that.

G Dagley.

Offline kyn

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HENRY GRIFFITHS, on his oath, saith:-
I reside at 28, Frederick Road, Gillingham, Kent, and am a Draughtsman 2nd Class in the Constructive Manager’s Department, H.M. Dockyard, Chatham.
I produced a plan (exhibit 6) of part of the upper deck of H.M.S. Marshal Soult which I prepared.  The starboard side of the ship is at the lower side of the plan.  The measurements shown on the plan are correct.  No. 2 mess shown on the plan is the Chief Petty Officers mess.  I have prepared an enlarged plan of that mess which I now produce (Ex. No. 7).

H Griffiths

Offline kyn

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Hubert Sidney Deggan Murder - HMS Marshal Soult - Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2011, 17:40:37 »
This file does contain some detailed information, diagrams and photographs.  I will not post anything that I believe may be considered upsetting but I will try and include as much detail as possible to provide the full story.  This will include witness statements.  If you find anything on here you find upsetting then please contact me to discuss.

TO THE REGISTRAR OF THE COURT OF CRIMINAL APPEAL.

NOTICE OF APPEAL OR APPLICATION OR LEAVE TO APPEAL AGAINST
CONVICTION OR SENTENCE.

Name of Appellant:  LEONARD ALBERT BRIGSTOCK
Convicted at the:  Kent Assizes held at:  Maidstone
Offence of which convicted:  Wilful murder
Sentence:  Death
Date when convicted:  19th February 1935
Date when sentence passed:  19th February 1935
Name of Prison:  Wandsworth

I the above-named Appellant hereby give you notice that I desire to appeal to the Court of Criminal Appeal against my:  Conviction
On the grounds hereinafter set forth on page 2 of this notice.
(Signed)  LEONARD ALBERT BRIGSTOCK
Dated this:  28 days of:  February A.D. 1935

1.   Did the Judge whom you were tried grant you a Certificate that it was a fit case for Appeal?   No.
2.   Do you desire the Court of Criminal Appeal to assign you legal aid?   Yes.
If your answer to this question is “Yes,” then answer the following questions:-
(a)   What was your occupation and what wages, salary or income were you receiving before your conviction?   Stoker P.O.  R.N.
£2.18.0 pwk. (approx.)
(b)   Have you any means to enable you to obtain legal aid for yourself?   No.
3.   Is any Solicitor now acting for you?   Ellis & Ellis – Maidstone Kent
4.   Do you desire to be present when the Court considers your appeal?   Yes.
5.   Do you desire to apply for leave to call any witnesses on your appeal?   Yes.


 

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