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Author Topic: Knights Templar Church, Dover  (Read 4235 times)

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merc

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Re: Knights Templar Church, Dover
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2011, 22:31:01 »
Some of the information was on a board next to the remains, and the bit about Mathew Paris i found on Wikipedia.

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Re: Knights Templar Church, Dover
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2011, 21:43:51 »
I have read the same but have also read scant supposition that it was Templar but never read that history before Merc. Where did you find the information may I inquire?

merc

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Re: Knights Templar Church, Dover
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2011, 17:35:09 »
Interesting, thanks,


Guest

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Re: Knights Templar Church, Dover
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2011, 16:59:48 »
I understand that the most recent expert opinion on this, Merc, is that it's not a Knights Templar church but a wayside chapel. Why a circular nave, usually an accepted Knights Templar feature, should not be a Knights Templar feature here, I don't know. But then, I don't claim to be an expert.
There is supposed to have been a Knights Templar village, Braddon, on top of the Western Heights (hence, perhaps, the name for the Bredenstone on the Drop Redoubt) but since the entire top of the hill was artificially scarped in the C19 to make the Citadel and Drop Redoubt visible from each other, and the whole area is now a Scheduled Monument, we shall probably never know.

merc

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Knights Templar Church, Dover
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2011, 16:41:22 »


In a shallow ditch next to Citadel Road are the foundations of a 12th century church built by the Knights Templar. Work started on the small church in 1128 when the Knights Templar first arrived in England from Jerusalem. The church was abandoned in 1185 and rediscovered by engineers in the 19th Century building the Western Heights fortifications. According to Matthew Paris, a Benedictine monk, it was the site of King John's submission to the papal legate Pandulph in 1213.


 

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