News: “Over the graves of the Druids and under the wreck of Rome,
Rudely but surely they bedded the plinth of the days to come.
Behind the feet of the Legions and before the Norseman’s ire
Rudely but greatly begat they the framing of State and Shire
Rudely but deeply they laboured, and their labour stand till now.
If we trace on ancient headlands the twist of their eight-ox plough.”

-Rudyard Kipling
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Flushing Pier  (Read 20907 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1104
  • Appreciation 74
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #25 on: September 22, 2018, 23:41:08 »
A slight aside and maybe one for Bilgerat. Where did the word dolphin arise in the context of a warning or mooring post ?  I first came across it in this context in the Arthur Ransome book 'Coot Club' when the characters take a boat through Great Yarmouth.
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Local Hiker

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 72
  • Appreciation 4
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #24 on: September 22, 2018, 00:41:59 »
Google Earth May 2018. Timber bases still quite clearly visible

Offline MartinR

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 62
  • Appreciation 4
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #23 on: September 21, 2018, 23:25:45 »
I've just been looking at some old charts that I have of the Isle of Sheppey.  In 1974 the chart shows the railway line heading down to the Flushing pier which is noted as "ruins".  The area is labelled "Queenborough Point" and at that time was a distinct promontory  with mudflats either side.  By 1994 the railway line has disappeared and the pier was labels as "Obstn" and "ruins", but still showed the hammerhead shape of the pier.  The most recent chart still shows Queenborough Point as a location, but with land reclamation either side the coastline is a gentle sweeping curve.  Flushing pier is unmentioned, but there are still the "dolphins" at either end which carry quick flashing red lights.  From personal observation at low tide the timbers of the pier are still in the mud, and are a serious threat to any shipping/boating that strays between the dolphins on a falling tide.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1523
  • Appreciation 238
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #22 on: September 21, 2018, 22:54:18 »
The warship in Conan's third photo is the Edgar class cruiser HMS Endymion, recognizable by the white band around the forward funnel. Launched 1891 and scrapped in 1920.
In September 1902 she was placed in C Division of the Medway Fleet Reserve. From 1906 to 1912 she served as a tender to HMS Wildfire at Sheerness. In 1912 she joined the 3rd Fleet at Portsmouth.

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1104
  • Appreciation 74
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #21 on: September 19, 2018, 23:46:20 »
Here's a reload of some photos of the pier that i posted and have disappeared from the forum

This one from the coal days



One of the pier from the sea



and one from the end of the pier



To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1523
  • Appreciation 238
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #20 on: September 18, 2018, 19:19:11 »
Flushing Pier Destroyed by Fire. Friday 19th May 1882.
Destruction of Queenborough Pier.

A special telegram from Sheerness states that the London, Chatham, and Dover Railway Company's pier at Queenborough took fire at about four p.m. on Friday. The fire spreading rapidly, nothing could be done to check it, and the pier was totally destroyed. The Flushing mail-boat, Prince Hendrick, which was along side the pier, managed to get clear with but little damage, but the brigantine Census, belonging to Whitstable, which was lying aground, shared the fate of the pier itself. The cause of the fire is unknown.

A later telegram from Sheerness says the flames were first seen in the station by one of the officials, but such a hold had the fire obtained on the wooden structure, assisted by the strong east wind, that the conflagration spread with extreme rapidity. The officials in the goods department on the west side had to run for their lives without being able to take money, books, or documents, or to remove several railway trucks. The timber of the pier had been specially prepared by the creosote process, and this favoured the fire. In a quarter of an hour the pier was a blaze from beginning to end. The mail boat, Prince Hendrick, was quickly unmoored, but an unfortunate schooner which was aground caught fire, and was destroyed. Every exertion was made to stop the flames from spreading to the large slaugherhouses, &c.

      From the Weekly Mail. 20th May 1882.

Destruction of Queenborough Pier. 1882.
Two Lives Lost.

The fire which destroyed Queenborough pier was not distinguished (sic) until early on Saturday morning. The pier and all the buildings connected therewith, and the steam cranes, telegraphic offices and instruments, and twelve trucks laden with merchandise - including, it is said, a large quantity of silver goods - were destroyed. The schooner Constance, which was burned to the water's edge, was laden with coals. Two railway porters, named Highsted and Giles, perished in the flames. John Parnum, the chief porter, escaped with a few burns. On Saturday the leading railway officials and pier staff proceeded to Dover to arrange for carrying on the traffic with the continent. The Flushing boats had to embark and disembark their passengers at Dover in consequence of the destruction of Queenborough pier. An additional gang of men has been put on to meet the requirements of the extra service and to prevent delay. It was stated at Dover that two men are in custody on suspicion of having set fire to the pier.
     From the South Wales Daily News. 22nd May 1882.
           I can find no other report of arson.

  The two men who died.
  George Giles, stevedore, age 42.
  Harry Highsted, labourer, age 28.

Flushing Pier Destroyed by Fire. Thursday 19th July 1900.
Pier Destroyed by Fire.
Enormous Damage.
Gallantry of Bluejackets.

A fire broke out on Thursday on Queenborough Pier, and spread with alarming rapidity to the whole structure. The destruction of property was enormous, the sheds being full with goods just landed from the Dutch mail. Commander Herbert Tyler and 40 bluejackets arrived from Sheerness Naval School of Gunnery, and worked their way along the burning structure from the south-west corner to the upper end. The fire had by this time extended to the offices, and the sailors' efforts were directed to saving the houses on the opposite bank. The Royal Zeeland Company's mail steamer Konigen-Regente was at her berth when the fire broke out, but steamed away before the fire reached the front of the pier.
At 9 a.m. the underneath portions of the pier were still blazing, despite the work performed by the fire brigades ashore and the fire floats on the river. It is believed the damage will not fall far short of £100,000. Great credit is due to the steamer belonging to the Royal Engineers, which saved the coal brig Lena from destruction. The Dutch and German mails and passengers were embarked on the Konigen Regente at Port Victoria, and the mail packet Deutschland loaded her passengers and mails at that port.

    From the South Wales Daily News, 20th July 1900.

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1104
  • Appreciation 74
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #19 on: January 04, 2014, 21:05:06 »
some Pathe newsreel footage of the pier being opened in 1928

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/new-thames-port/query/queenborough

also in CDPs opening post there is mention of HMS Orion being broken up and there is Pathe newsreel footage of that here

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/last-moments-of-famous-battleship/query/queenborough
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1104
  • Appreciation 74
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #18 on: December 26, 2013, 20:43:03 »
Flushing pier from the sea

To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1104
  • Appreciation 74
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #17 on: August 21, 2011, 12:49:48 »
In my post of June 14th I put a photo of what I thought was the Medway Queen but comparing it with the the picture of the P/S City of Rochester posted by Bryn Clinch on November 14th 2010 I think they are one and the same

http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=1395.0
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Paul

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Appreciation 61
  • Batpigs'n'Boobies.. ;)
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #16 on: June 16, 2011, 18:39:41 »
Great pic :)
Its taken from the exact same place that one of my recent ones was taken.
Also note how much of "Dead Mans Island" is there in that pic. It could have had some of Swaleness Fort left on it?
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline Sylvaticus

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 195
  • Appreciation 9
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #15 on: June 15, 2011, 23:00:43 »
Martin H, marvellous picture. I wonder if 1860 isn't too early for this latest photo? The 1869 OS 6in shows  just a short pier jutting straight out, presumably the original structure. Same on 1894 25in. Then the 1896 25in. shows the large extension across the end that they're building here. Mitchell and Smith's book record an extension being opened in 1876. Restoration after the two fires also required rebuilding work.

Martin H

  • Guest
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #14 on: June 15, 2011, 21:10:31 »
Have another pic of the pier, this shows it under construction in the 1860's
hows that for a pic. It was given to me by Mr Cockney of Redan Place, his grandfather was the contractor who build the pier.

Offline ChrisExiledFromStrood

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 186
  • Appreciation 6
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #13 on: June 15, 2011, 19:50:54 »
Flushing = Vlissingen in Dutch (at least these days). The V isn't voiced though, so it sounds like an English F.

Offline CDP

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 834
  • Appreciation 87
    • SHEERNESS/SHEPPEY/PENNEY
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #12 on: June 15, 2011, 16:40:51 »
Martin , Thanks for the photos especially the cooured ones .My grandfathes was Dave Wildish
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

seafordpete

  • Guest
Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2011, 09:02:21 »
Port Victoria was on the other side -Grain

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines