News: “Over the graves of the Druids and under the wreck of Rome,
Rudely but surely they bedded the plinth of the days to come.
Behind the feet of the Legions and before the Norseman’s ire
Rudely but greatly begat they the framing of State and Shire
Rudely but deeply they laboured, and their labour stand till now.
If we trace on ancient headlands the twist of their eight-ox plough.”

-Rudyard Kipling
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Author Topic: Flushing Pier  (Read 13145 times)

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Offline Sylvaticus

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #40 on: October 06, 2018, 15:50:46 »
JohnH, if you look at the first post in this thread there is a photograph of the pier taken in 1956 which will give you a good idea of its appearance around the time you may have seen it.
Ref the condition of the Flushing Pier in that photo. It never recovered from damage by the 1953 storm and unusually high tide. The pier had many uses over the years. It was used by the RN during WW2, who extended it as far as North Road or High St, they also used the marshland between the seawall and Whiteway Rd. The footbridge seen on many photos allowed pedestrians on the seawall to pass the pier and railway. After WW1, the Flushing Pier was used by Cox & Danks for breaking up the German ships.

Offline Longpockets

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #39 on: October 05, 2018, 18:34:18 »
Thunderbolt Pier is at Chatham.

Yes, sorry, was thinking of Chatham instead of Sheerness.

Offline CDP

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #38 on: October 04, 2018, 11:02:23 »
Many a time I have walked across the Cornwallis jetty to catch the frot boat to take me up to the floating dock.
One ship that I worked on was the Loch Achinalt  (spelling ??) for the New Zealand Navy which was renamed the NZ  Pukaki or the Tutira .
On one of my trips to Australia in Melbourne harbour, who should I see but this ship and suddenly there appeared some of the NZ sailors who invited us aboard and we stayed all day drinking their heath etc., and a good time was had by all !!!!!!!!!
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #37 on: October 04, 2018, 08:34:53 »
The dockyard pier was/is Thunderbolt Pier but it does not have a head, it is parallel to the dockyard

The pier inside the Dockyard is actually the Cornwallis Jetty. You can make out the former HMS Cornwallis alongside the wharf with the pontoons secured to it and the floating dry-dock secured to them.

Thunderbolt Pier is at Chatham.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline Longpockets

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #36 on: October 03, 2018, 18:29:09 »
The dockyard pier was/is Thunderbolt Pier but it does not have a head, it is parallel to the dockyard

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #35 on: October 03, 2018, 17:58:16 »
Does this photo help? Taken 1951, it shows a floating dock and Sheerness pier.
http://britainfromabove.org.uk/en/image/EAW037835
Hometown Blues Syd Arthur

Offline JohnH

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #34 on: October 03, 2018, 17:39:01 »
Thank you but I don't think that was it.  The other thing I remember is passing a floating dock and I think that was near the pier head in question.  I now think that this pier head (or whatever it was) must have been part of the Royal Navy dockyard

Offline Local Hiker

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #33 on: October 01, 2018, 19:49:07 »
JohnH, maybe you are referring to Port Victoria pier on Grain where the LNG terminal is currently. Flushing Pier is a little into the Swale so would not be so obvious on trips from Southend to the Medway. I won't elaborate here because that would be off-topic.

Try this link, particularly for the 1947 Pathe News video.
http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=16492.msg139185#msg139185

Offline Longpockets

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #32 on: October 01, 2018, 19:20:57 »
JohnH, there are a few contenders for your pier here

Offline JohnH

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #31 on: October 01, 2018, 17:42:41 »
Thank you but that is not what I recall seeing.  What I seem to recall is a pier head (on a fairly short pier) with no building on it but a large board facing the water; I assume this would have originally had the name of the pier (or something like that) on it.  Does anyone have any ideas, please?

Offline smiffy

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #30 on: September 25, 2018, 18:45:06 »
JohnH, if you look at the first post in this thread there is a photograph of the pier taken in 1956 which will give you a good idea of its appearance around the time you may have seen it.

Offline JohnH

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #29 on: September 25, 2018, 17:42:57 »
Were the remains of this pier still extant in 1954?  I recall seeing the some sort of pier or remains of a pier from one of the boats that used to ply from Southend seafront to the Medway estuary and back.  (I was only 6 at the time.)  On the way back into Southend, the Medway Queen was on the end of Southend Pier, the only time I ever saw her.  Some time ago I was talking to a man from the MPQS who told me that he had been on the Medway Queen many times and had otherwise seen her many times, but never from on board another boat!

Offline Sylvaticus

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #28 on: September 24, 2018, 11:43:03 »
This might be useful:

https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Seamarks/Moorings

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolphin_(structure)

https://ask.metafilter.com/101821/Derivation-of-dolphin-mooring
the OED has:

    6. Applied to various contrivances resembling or fancifully likened to a dolphin.

    a. In early artillery, each of two handles cast solid on a cannon nearly over the trunnions, commonly made in the conventional form of a dolphin.
    [...]

    b. Naut. (a) A spar or block of wood with a ring bolt at each end for vessels to ride by; a mooring-buoy. (b) A mooring-post or bollard placed at the entrance of a dock or along a quay, wharf or beach, to make hawsers fast to. (c) A wreath of plaited cordage fastened about a mast or yard, to prevent the latter from falling in case of the ropes or chains which support it being shot away in action.
      1764 CROKER, etc. Dict. Arts & Sc., Dolphins of the Mast. 1833 MARRYAT P. Simple vi, What with dead-eyes, and shrouds, cats and catblocks, dolphins, and dolphin-strikers, I was so puzzled.. that [etc.]. 1840 Evid. Hull Docks Comm. 90 Q. What is a dolphin? A. There is a post in the middle, and it is inclosed round by other posts, and this post in the middle is the post to make the rope fast to, and the others support it; it is for the vessels to warp into the river Hull. 1844 Hull Dock Act 91 Substantial hawsers.. fixed to the dolphins. [...] 1867 SMYTH Sailor's Word-bk., Bollard.. also a lighter sort of dolphin for attaching vessels to. Ibid., Puddening.. a thick wreath of yarns, matting, or oakum (called a dolphin), tapering from the middle towards the ends.

    c. Gr. Antiq. A heavy mass of lead, etc. suspended from a yard at the bows of a war-vessel, to be dropped into an enemy's ship when at close quarters.
    [...]

    d. ‘A technical term applied to the pipe and cover at a source for the supply of water’ (Weale Dict. Terms Arch. 1849-50).

    e. Angling. A kind of hook.
    [...]

    f. (See quot.) U.S.
    1905 Terms Forestry & Logging 35 Dolphin, a cluster of piles to which a boom is secured.

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #27 on: September 23, 2018, 17:05:10 »
Sorry to disappoint folks, but I haven't a clue. I've always ever known them as Dolphins and have never thought to ask why.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline smiffy

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Re: Flushing Pier
« Reply #26 on: September 23, 2018, 14:29:13 »
Looks like there is some disagreement over whether there is a definitive answer:

https://ask.metafilter.com/101821/Derivation-of-dolphin-mooring

I would also be interested in Bilgerat's take on this.

 

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