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Author Topic: Charles Dickens in Rochester  (Read 8480 times)

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Offline CDP

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Re: Charles Dickens in Rochester
« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2015, 17:58:35 »
From the Sheerness newspapers kept at Sheerness Library.

Attempt to overturn C.D'S carriage at Chatham                                     1862 June 21st

            Literary Institute to ask C.D. to attend                                         1863 Oct 17th

            Paper by his son why whose names were used in the books    1910 Oct 8th

            Alfred Tennyson Dickens, his son, dies in New York                  1912 Jan 6th

            The names in his books are from Chalk Graveyard                   1913 Sept 20th

            “Little Nell “ died and buried burnt ?? shop??/  land??                1916 May 16th

            Son here to read fathers work for the Red Cross                       1914 Nov 21st
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Charles Dickens in Rochester
« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2015, 11:17:33 »
pr1uk,
I really don't think Eastgate House is a religious cult centre. It's been undergoing restoration for a long while, but I think it's going to be an exhibition centre and community space, according to Medway Council website. The house reopens this year (if not already).
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline pr1uk

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Re: Charles Dickens in Rochester
« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2015, 06:07:40 »
"Eastgate house (Rochester Museum) contains many relics of the great novelst. Dickens described Eastgate House in his unfinished novel 'Edwin Drood' as the Nun's house".

"The swiss chalet in which Dickens did much of his later writing, once stood in the grounds of Gad's Hill Place. It was presented to him in 1864 by the actor Charles Fechter. It was moved to Rochester Museum in 1961".



From the history of Medway published by the evening post 1969.


Eastgate House used to be the Rochester Museum, no idea when this ended as I had been working away for 30 years but now it`s a religious cult centre. Used to be a great place to visit a little dark and the floorboards creaked a bit but was full of interesting items, sadly not any more.
To be contented in life you must learn the difference between what you want and what you need
-Peter

merc

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Re: Charles Dickens in Rochester
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2015, 22:30:19 »
Tuesday marked the 145th anniversary of Charles Dickens death and also the 150th anniversary of the tragic Staplehurst rail crash in which Dickens was involved.

After his death a grave was actually prepared for Dickens in St. Mary's Chapel in Rochester Cathedral (now more commonly referred to as the Lady Chapel I think). His own wish was to be buried in the old burial ground in Rochester Castle's moat but, as already stated, in the end it was decided he should be buried in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey.

aitch

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Re: Charles Dickens in Rochester
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2010, 21:07:38 »
"Eastgate house (Rochester Museum) contains many relics of the great novelst. Dickins described Eastgate House in his unfinished novel 'Edwin Drood' as the Nun's house".

"The swiss chalet in which Dickins did much of his later writing, once stood in the grounds of Gad's Hill Place. It was presented to him in 1864 by the actor Charles Fechter. It was moved to Rochester Museum in 1961."



From the history of Medway published by the evening post 1969

Offline Jon

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Re: Charles Dickens in Rochester
« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2009, 21:29:15 »
Dickens owned land on both sides of the road -the chalet used to be in the woodland on the opposite side of the road to the house - he used the tunnel to go to the chalet in safety.  He called that area his wilderness and with all the mirrors on the inside of the chalet combine with the windows he said it was like the outside came in.

The chalet itself was delivered to Higham station in boxes (it was a gift from a friend) with instructions in Swiss and a French engineer.  It is held together with wooden pegs.

Offline Paul

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Re: Charles Dickens in Rochester
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2008, 22:14:15 »
This site is rather good :)

http://www.dickenslive.com/
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline kyn

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Re: Charles Dickens in Rochester
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2008, 22:05:36 »
The life sized statue was donated to England but his son sent it back in anger for them ignoring his will.  Funny that after stating in his will that there be no plaque, statues etc in his memory the whole of Rochester is smothered in memorials, even if most are for his books!

And this one in the cathedral


merc

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Re: Charles Dickens in Rochester
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2008, 21:57:23 »
I found a few interesting things i didn't know about Charles Dickens at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Dickens

"On 9 June 1865, while returning from France with Ternan, Dickens was involved in the Staplehurst rail crash in which the first seven carriages of the train plunged off a cast iron bridge that was being repaired. The only first-class carriage to remain on the track was the one in which Dickens was travelling. Dickens spent some time tending the wounded and the dying before rescuers arrived. Before leaving, he remembered the unfinished manuscript for Our Mutual Friend, and he returned to his carriage to retrieve it. Typically, Dickens later used this experience as material for his short ghost story The Signal-Man in which the central character has a premonition of his own death in a rail crash. He based the story around several previous rail accidents, such as the Clayton Tunnel rail crash of 1861.

Dickens managed to avoid an appearance at the inquest into the crash, as it would have become known that he was travelling that day with Ellen Ternan and her mother, which could have caused a scandal. Ellen had been Dickens's companion since the breakdown of his marriage, and, as he had met her in 1857, she was most likely the ultimate reason for that breakdown."


"Contrary to his wish to be buried in Rochester Cathedral, he was laid to rest in the Poets' Corner of Westminster Abbey. The inscription on his tomb reads: "He was a sympathiser to the poor, the suffering, and the oppressed; and by his death, one of England's greatest writers is lost to the world." Dickens'
;s will stipulated that no memorial be erected to honour him. The only life-size bronze statue of Dickens, cast in 1891 by Francis Edwin Elwell, is located in Clark Park in the Spruce Hill neighbourhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the United States."



Offline Paul

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Re: Charles Dickens in Rochester
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2008, 21:41:08 »
He wrote a lot of stuff in Southwark,London
He had avery interesting Life :)
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline kyn

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Re: Charles Dickens in Rochester
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2008, 21:34:55 »
I've just borrowed my dads Dickens books so eventually i will read them, it will be good to read them and see the buildings the stories were based on!

Offline kyn

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Charles Dickens in Rochester
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2008, 21:18:29 »
I hope others will be able to add to this thread asIi didn't get many pictures of the buildings along the High Street etc, however i was very pleased to find this hidden behind Eastgate House  :)





Oh and this ::)




If they had found his toilet would that have been added to the pretty garden too  ??? ;D

 

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