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Author Topic: Muster Station  (Read 11186 times)

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Offline mikeb

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2016, 19:14:24 »
No smiffy, all gone although the road alignment is still more or less correct. I have just noticed that white "triangle" with a faint square in the middle is the old muster bell which is still extant in the yard, but it has been moved. I started my apprenticeship in the yard same year as the photo, 1960. It seems a long time ago now!

Offline smiffy

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2016, 18:08:40 »
You're quite correct, mikeb - I wasn't paying attention and stand corrected. I don't think there is a single building left in that photograph that is still standing.

Offline mikeb

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2016, 16:10:53 »
Not wishing to be too pedantic, but the road leading off to lower left of photo lead to Pembroke Gate. Also just visible are the exchange sidings and the three "white" roofed building is  / was the Main Canteen. Interesting picture smiffy.

Offline smiffy

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2016, 14:39:24 »
1960 view from Google Earth shows it nicely. Main gate at lower left.


Offline Dozydog

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #13 on: December 10, 2016, 16:54:58 »
Hi Leofwine,
I worked in Chatham Dockyard and No3 Muster station was exactly the same as the photograph in 1973.

If you walked in Pembroke gate and continued in a straight line, it was halfway down on the right between Pembroke gate and the bascule bridge crossing No2 basin. The Muster Station was basically a clocking in place. When you walked in there were racks with slots in, where all the clock cards would be. You picked up your card from the rack, clocked in and then placed your card in the rack the other side of the clock ... you would reverse the procedure when finishing work. There were racks either side of the clock. One was "In" and the other was "out". This provided a system where the timekeeper (later referred to as "recorders") would know if you were at work or not.

davidt

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #12 on: October 23, 2011, 22:33:09 »
There's a separate post on the forum about Muster Stations 1 & 2. Some comments about Muster Station 3 have been added on there as well. These also confirm the location as being inside Pembroke Gate.

I've had the card in my collection for a few years and I'd never noticed the railway line. That's one of the reasons why I like the old cards so much. Each time I look at them there's something I haven't spotted before. I agree with you Sentinel S4. It is a great picture.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #11 on: October 23, 2011, 20:39:55 »
Hi mikeb. I don't know the geography of the dockyard well, at all if truth be known, I only know it on the ground from visiting the preserved remenant. I had thought the young lady was just crossing part of the internal network but it is nice to know that she is crossing the 'main line'. Thanks for the heads up on the detail. The postcard has so much life in it I am astounded, you can see the hopes and fears of the workforce, the ships in the back ground................. There is so much going on and so much now lost. S4.
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Offline mikeb

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #10 on: October 23, 2011, 20:19:04 »
Sentinel S4, hi.
We have exchanged notes re-the Dockyard Railway Branch, well, bear with me here, but the Muster Station in the postcard was just in side Old Pembroke Gate and opposite the Main Canteen. The young girl in the post card referred to is actually crossing the rail line from the exchange sidings into the Dockyard proper. A bit tenuous I know but an interesting link with previous posts perhaps.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2011, 18:38:20 »
Thank you davidt, it is nice to be close to right on a date. I said 1900-18 and your card falls in the middle. I still think it is a great pic full of social action and history. S4.
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davidt

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2011, 17:47:27 »
Re the date of the card, the 'golden age' of postcards was from around 1902 to the end of the first world war so you'll find the majority of the old cards are from that time. I happen to have the same card in my collection and it's dated 15/02/1908, so even older than originally suspected.

Offline mikeb

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2011, 11:07:51 »
Every workshop or permanent work place had its own dedicated muster or clocking in /out place. These were in, or just adjacent, to a persons work place. However for the hundreds of workers who were "afloat", temporary clocks were placed along-side ships or docks as needed, together with, as has been noted, offices for "recorders" who monitored the clock card records and timekeeping. Ships in refit could spend months on one berth or in one dock. ( To my knowledge HMS Forth spent 9 months in one place) When they moved the mobile clocks went with them, they were on wheels! It was always a bone of contention that those working on the far side of the basins had much further to go, especially if on foot, than those who clocked on just inside one of the gates, and therefore they spent more time, unpaid, in what today we would call travelling time.

torpointblue

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2011, 10:47:34 »
If I recall correctly No 3 Muster station was approx 150 yds inside Pembroke gate . Just before the Pattern shop. Looking at new maps it would have stood where the roundabout is for the tunnel. It's use was for in and out muster ( clocking station) When I was in the yard, aswell as clocks and card racks . there was an office for recorders ( personnel who recorded hours worked for pay purposes ) and there was also a safety footware shop which open a few hours a week

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2011, 18:49:02 »
Great slice of history there though. One more thing; there are no sailors in sight all you can see are civilians. Love it Leofwine, many regards, Sentinel S4.

That was what appealed to me about the card. This one is clearly the civilian workers (mainly Brompton & Gillingham residents I imagine).

And thanks for the suggestions on dates, it seems earlier than I first thought.
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Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2011, 18:16:59 »
I think No 3 Muster Station was somewhere inside Pembroke Gate. The ships in the background are in one of the basins. The Muster Stations were a sort of Clocking in station at the start and end of day.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Muster Station
« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2011, 18:04:57 »
I am thinking that the date is closer to the First War, look at the little girls style of hat and dress and there is a woman behind her in the crowd and her coat screem 1900-18. There seems to be some heavy tonnage behind the scene on the river, at least three ships as I can make out seven funnels of three styles plus a mast. Also are they the covered slips? Would a Muster Station be where the comon labourer would be given work? Or not as demand required. Great slice of history there though. One more thing; there are no sailors in sight all you can see are civilians. Love it Leofwine, many regards, Sentinel S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

 

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