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Author Topic: Glencoe School Chatham  (Read 45501 times)

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Offline smiler

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #27 on: January 24, 2012, 18:15:21 »
Cant see it on nufanmans photos but there used to be a bikeshed in between the blocks facing White Rd where we took it in turns in the mornings to go out and read the max/min temperatures cant remember which teacher it was for.

Offline mikeb

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #26 on: January 24, 2012, 10:46:49 »
Quote
Just a bit of additional info; the school was a sub-station for the AFS/NFS during the war.

I attended Glencoe infants & juniors 1948-1954ish and can re-call that just in side the Glencoe Road entrance there was, to us, a large long open shed, akin to a cow shed, against the dividing wall between juniors and infants. In here we played when wet, but on the walls were various AFS signs etc and brackets from which ladders were hung and hoses laid out to dry, we were told. It always puzzled me as a kiddie how the fire engine got through that narrow gate!!

chathamhammer

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #25 on: January 24, 2012, 00:05:47 »
Good old glencoe, i know i started this thread, but just realised  lutonman,s saying about going to the infants in buller  road?,that road was back towards palmerston road, it was redferns road where the infants was!, i even lived opposite it in the  early 80,s -late 90.s, even walking down to the edward v11 for a drink, always brought a memerory back to me

Offline afsrochester

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #24 on: January 23, 2012, 18:15:21 »
Just a bit of additional info; the school was a sub-station for the AFS/NFS during the war.

Offline peterchall

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #23 on: October 30, 2011, 13:34:08 »
Welcome to the forum :).
One of my daughters also started at Glencoe in 1963, and I wonder if you knew her – Caroline Challis.
Regarding your bus passes, did you live on Davis Estate? My eldest daughter, who was at Glencoe from 1959 to 1965, remembers a group of girls coming from there by bus but who left when a primary school opened on Davis Estate.
And your memory is right about the uniform – it was green.
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Memlane

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #22 on: October 30, 2011, 07:26:11 »
I started at the infants in 1963, I remember our class walking from outside the school to enter the dinning hall in the school grounds (not sure why), I also remember not liking the school dinners and was sick after eating the spring greens! I seem to remember my school uniform was green then.

Does anyone remember the bus passes we had in a little brown holder hanging round our necks?

Funny, I had forgotten most of my teacher's names but some of you had reminded me, I remember Miss Singleton.
Does anyone have any old school photos from then?

Offline peterchall

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #21 on: August 21, 2011, 18:16:45 »
Thanks, smiler. So post war Glencoe became just a Primary School (Infants & Junior), and secondary Education, of whatever kind, took place elsewhere.

For the record, pre-war and post-war selection for secondary schools was different. Pre-war you took an entrance exam for a particular school; at age 11 for the 'local' Grammar School, and age 12 for the 'local' Tech School; if you didn't pass you stayed at the Elementary School, as already described, although parents could pay for their child to go to a selective school. Post -war pupils took the 11+ at age 11 and as a result were selected for a Grammar School, Tech School or Secondary Modern School, but not for any particular school. There were some schools, known as Comprehensive Schools, that combined Grammar School, Tech School, and Secondary School streams, supposedly having the advantage of flexibility in that a pupil could be in a 'Grammar' stream for maths, and in a 'Secondary' stream for Geography, for instance.
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Offline smiler

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #20 on: August 21, 2011, 09:04:15 »
It was only infants & juniors when I left there in 54.

Offline peterchall

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #19 on: August 20, 2011, 22:06:00 »
I only went there for two terms from January to July 1939, when I was 10, so was only concerned with the ‘upper’ school (I’m not sure what it was called), but I’m sure there was an infants department.

The reason I’m not sure of the name of the upper department is that in those days one went to so-called ‘Elementary School’ all through school life, leaving at 14, unless selected for a Grammar School at age 11 (leaving at 15 or 16?) or Junior Technical School at age 12 (leaving at 15)

Taking Glencoe Road as an example, there was an Infants Dept, age 5 to 7 and was mixed boys and girls, then separate Boys’ and Girls’ Depts, for up to age 14 unless selected for Grammar or Tech School, but I'm not sure whether the ‘upper’ schools were divided into Juniors and Seniors – apart from those leaving to go to selective schools at age 11 or 12, there was no other distinction - so there seems no reason for there to be.

As a result of the 1944 Education Act everyone went into secondary education at age 11, either due to selection for Grammar or Technical School (11plus Exam) or to a Secondary Modern School. I’m not sure, but I don’t think Glencoe had a Secondary Modern Dept, but had only Infants (5-7) and separate Junior Depts for Boys and Girls (7-11), with everyone going different ways thereafter.
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Offline snodlandmalc

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #18 on: August 20, 2011, 17:52:55 »
that sounds about right,peterchall,what ages went to st.johns then ? was it infants and juniors ? if it was then my father would have had him in the mid 1930's.My dad told me that st.johns was his first job after leaving college,dont know how he knew that,wether he told him in later years?.
I know what you mean about still liking him even when he was being mean,he had a 'quiet way' about him,I remember him as being fairly softly spoken so when he raised it slightly he was obeyed.He had one of those expressions that always seemed friendly.
I think he was still wearing that jacket in the sixties ! or one like it

Offline peterchall

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #17 on: August 20, 2011, 16:46:32 »
I reckon he was about 30 when he taught me at St John's in 1939, so if he retired at 65 it would have been about 1975. I don't know why I liked him, because he told my mum that I was too slow in my classwork and needed to liven up - completely untrue, of course :)
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Offline smiler

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #16 on: August 20, 2011, 14:21:33 »
Mr Brown taught my father in the 30s me early 50s and snodland malc 60s so he had quite along career teaching all the years I knew him he always wore the same coat [unless he had a 2nd identical] a brown herringbone sports jacket very nice teacher.

Offline snodlandmalc

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #15 on: August 20, 2011, 08:27:27 »
Mr Brown taught my father and then me ! small world eh,he too was a pupil at St.Johns in the thirties as he lived in ordnance st.Mr Brown lived in Gladstone road for many years he use to walk to school everyday,when I started in 63 the boys who lived near him would wait for him outside his house in the mornings and carry his bag to school,a sign of his popularity.He had an allotment near Balfour Road and for years after I would occasionally see him,he would always ask how I was and about the boys in my class and tell me who he had seen.I think he passed away in the eighties,his wife had died in the early 70's which was sad he was a true gent.
Didnt Mr Richards have a green sports car ? the school secretary in my day was a miss(or mrs) crook.

Offline Lutonman

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2011, 18:47:10 »
Yes, the outside toilet block was still there when I left in July 1962

Offline smiler

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Re: glencoe school chatham
« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2011, 17:54:39 »
Thanks Numanfan. Maybe the photos are only recent ones, but has the school changed over the years?
The toilets are no longer in the playground as they were when I left there in 54  :)

 

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