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Author Topic: Buses  (Read 44368 times)

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patmore

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« Reply #20 on: November 10, 2010, 13:50:48 »
Brider, the old Dodson was also a feature of Chatham Carnival in the 60s.
                                                                                     James

patmore

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Buses
« Reply #19 on: November 10, 2010, 13:45:12 »
Having not 'spotted a bus' since my schooldays I could not initially see myself getting involved with this thread. However old memories are being jogged and previously unanswered questions remain. So.....is it true that the original double deckers,which if memory serves were Saunders Roe,taken to the Isle of Sheppey had to be assembled on the island owing to the restrictions of the Sheppey bridge?
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Offline Peterj

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« Reply #18 on: November 10, 2010, 13:41:00 »
 M & D Daimler Fleetline lowbridge just entered service in the mid 60's on a football special "comfort stop" (Gillingham playing at Aldershot).  http://www.flickr.com/photos/30517988@N06/2857773872/in/contacts/

patmore

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« Reply #17 on: November 10, 2010, 13:11:12 »
Skinners
       James

Offline peterchall

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« Reply #16 on: November 10, 2010, 13:03:05 »
Seafordpete,
This link lists all M&D Leyland Tigers. Perhaps you can identify yours from the list.
http://www.skylineaviation.co.uk/buses/mdtig.html

As well as Hastings Tramways, didn't M&D have another subsidiary in the Hastings area until about the 1960s, running coaches?
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

seafordpete

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« Reply #15 on: November 10, 2010, 12:30:28 »
Does any one remember an M&D bus similar to this
http://www.buspics.co.uk/old-buses   it used to get put into service in emergencies about 1960. I remember it having a flatter,  black (fabric?) covered roof and possibly a bit squarer so earlier than the one in the pic. Real tip inside, seats worn out

Offline peterchall

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« Reply #14 on: November 10, 2010, 11:35:24 »
This link gives more details of the preserved Hastings trolleybus, including the fitting and operation of the TS3 engine:
http://www.1066.net/trolley/

But this is about the first trolleybuses, with 6 wheels. My recollection is of 4 wheelers with Weymann bodies identical to those favoured by M&D and C&D. I found a poor quality photo showing a trolleybus in M&D livery, with the M&D logo, I imagine taken just before the trolleybuses were abandoned. I still think they had 'Hastings Tramways' as a logo, and 'Hastings Tramways Company' name may have been retained even after trolleys took over. I know this is not Kent, but are there any 'foreigners' from Sussex who can confirm or deny? :)
The Registration of the bus in the photo was BDY864. Does anyone know when that registration was issued?
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Offline peterchall

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« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2010, 08:33:22 »
The photo was taken on 9th October 2010, so she must still be preserved. A Commer TS3 engine was chosen because it is 'flat' and would therefore fit under the floor. Presumably a Commer clutch and gearbox (not needed for a trolleybus) was fitted.

I'm writing from memory here, but I thought that the trolleybuses kept the old tram logo of 'Hastings Tramways' and were blue. So I'm puzzled as to why this bus is red and white, and lettered 'Hastings and District'.
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patmore

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« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2010, 22:07:14 »
http://www.flickr.com/photos/29485695@N02/5065070391/
I asked earlier about the old Dodson that ran around Hastings, this is the one I meant.
                                                                                                             James

Offline peterchall

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« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2010, 20:46:36 »
Peterchall
 Are there any C & D buses in preservation do you know?
GKE 68 is being preserved by 'Friends of Chatham Traction', but I don't know how far they've got. Here is their website, but again it is not complete as of today: http://www.chathamtraction.org.uk/#url
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Offline Megapack162

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« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2010, 20:35:23 »
My heads still got dents from sitting downstairs on DLs and forgetting.

I got my one and only ride on a DL Atlantean when 6445 (as it later became) operated the Math School to Chalk service just before withdrawal in 1977 or 78.
Upstairs it had normally arranged seats in the front and raised benches with a sunken side gangway for the last 3 rows.

Here it is after withdrawal whilst attempts were being made to preserve it, you can just about make out the raised seats at the back....


Bobnich

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« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2010, 19:57:18 »
Peterchall
I think the problem was that the transmission system often required special training for both engineering and driving staff. Your Chatham & District stuff is superb by the way with some fantastic photographs. You rarely see anything in the magazines about C & D, so I have learnt a lot already from your posts on here. The two photos of the Bristol clearly show the difference between the two bodies, I have always liked the lines of the Weymann bodies. I have a Corgi model of the Bristol with a utility body which is a nice model (GKT 550) which is of course the bus in your bottom photo with a later body. Are there any C & D buses in preservation do you know?

Offline peterchall

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« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2010, 18:04:32 »
Here is the cab of a Daimler bus with pre-selective gearbox, showing the gear selector lever and quadrant:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/superkevs/4188950304/

The driver moved the selector lever to the next gear required, but it didn't actually engage until the left pedal (equivalent to the clutch on normal types) was pressed and released.

Another common wartime utility bus was the Guy Arab 1. M&D had many of these with the 'long' bonnet to take a Gardner LW6 engine, although only having an LW5 (or was it an AEC?). An unusual feature was the gearbox 'H' having 1st and 2nd gears on the right, and 3rd and 4th on the left.
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Offline peterchall

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« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2010, 15:16:30 »
The Daimlers had pre-selector gearboxes, but I didn't know there were problems, apart from the different driving style.
In the Bristols the difference in performance between the AEC and the Gardner engines was noticeable. This extract from 'Chatham and District Traction Company' topic describes the Bristol K5G:
The Bristol K5Gs were powered by a 5-cylinder Gardner engine producing 95 horsepower, equivalent to about 12hp/ton (compared to about 60hp/ton for an average car), so performance was not exactly sparkling.
Governed speed in top gear was 32mph.
Time to accelerate from 0 to 30mph = 5 hours (actually, I made that up :) ).
Chatham Hill was a tedious 2nd gear climb and even parts of Canterbury Street needed 3rd.
The noise and vibration when flat-out were awesome.


In comparison, the M&Ds K6As were much smoother and more 'agile'.

The Daimlers seem to have been re-bodied in the same way as C&Ds Bristols.
Here is a Bristol with its original utility body:
                                

Here is a re-bodied one of the same series:
                                
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patmore

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« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2010, 15:05:00 »
What happened to the old Dodson that M&D used to run around Hastings?
                                                                                              James

 

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