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Author Topic: Hop Picking Photo  (Read 27464 times)

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Offline smiler

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #45 on: October 13, 2014, 14:23:23 »

    This photo was taken in 1917 when hop kilns were being used by the Ministry of Food where women were taught how to dry all sorts of vegetables in case of shortage during the war. Nothing wasted, the piles of veg peelings were used for pig swill.

Offline Jean

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #44 on: October 08, 2014, 14:43:15 »
It was definitely Faversham, on leaving the site we walked a short distance, then crossed over the road using the bridge, which I remember took us into a park, and eventually into the town. I did revisit some 6 or 7 years ago and was able to go directly to where the site had been. The road bridge was still there. The whole scene is etched in my brain.  My aunt went every year to another site, I am unable to remember where that was, except that it was somewhere in Kent. I have a very telling photograph of her in those surroundings. She did not like it either. It is quite sad to remember the poverty at that time.

KeithJG

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #43 on: October 06, 2014, 21:10:58 »
Here`s a sad one!.........when living in Copenhagen Road Gillingham me and my Mum were always at the hop gardens and also apple orchards picking early in the mornings. My Mum having been on the buses for so long gave them up to look after me.

I was 8yrs at the time and one day my Mum went on her own to the apple orchards and while there she fell out a tree, managed to save herself but banged her breast and later she had a lump. This was 1956 and the doctors said move out to the country as it will be better for you, so we moved to Frindsbury only for her to last 3yrs after dying of breast cancer in 1959.

I can still see me at 5am sitting in the small lorries that used to collect us up to take us picking........58 years ago.

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #42 on: September 25, 2014, 19:01:20 »
Jean, I know you said Faversham, but could your `accommodation` have been Ospringe? Although I cannot pinpoint the exact location, I definitely remember the hop-pickers huts on the right hand side of the A2, between the top of Judds Folly Hill and Ospringe, they certainly appeared to be very primitive.


Offline Jean

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #41 on: September 25, 2014, 17:34:10 »
Well, much to my embarrassment my past has caught up with me! I was taken at the age of twelve, along with my sister and brother, to the hop fields in Faversham. We stayed for around two weeks and lived in a tin hut that measured around 10' x 10', it contained one large bed with a mattress filled with straw. There was a curtain that drew across the front of the bed, and we slept end to end. We ate at small table and as there were only two dining chairs two of us had to perch on the bed. Water was heated on the communal bonfire. Toilets were of the Victorian kind, i.e  earth closets in block. At intervals during the week the district nurse would come onto the site and, walking through the lines of huts, would call out 'bring out your dead'. I did not want to be there and a photograph that I have shows how much I disliked it.  The weekends were the best time as we went to the local pub where everyone was very jolly. My brother is much teased because that pub is where he took his first steps at just over a year old.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #40 on: April 23, 2014, 00:03:23 »
Some more short British Pathe films of hop picking in Kent to view alongside those already posted by Conan.

Hopping Season begins at Paddock Wood (1919) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ottSQC6pkk

Profit and Pleasure Holiday (1924) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EbX-O6vdhs

The Hop Pickers Army (1925) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4-zQYlIuoc

The Hop Pickers Army (1930) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSY6lxqQdCA
Some nice shots.

Harvesting Hops in Kent (1930) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-jfrdGFj6g
Loading sacks on southern Railway Thornycroft at Tong Farm, Brenchley. Loading sacks onto LMS railway wagons.

The Hop Pickers Army (1931) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NnHeTYpp-0

Sir Kingsley Wood (Minster for Health) amongst the Hoppers http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbnmPYZZUWs

Hop Picking in Kent in Two Films from the 1940s http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sf2FSGf91IM
Huntley Film Archives.

Harold Berens on the Hop (1948) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqvSDg3MV1s
London Bridge to Paddock Wood.

Hop pickers off to Kent (1950) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIUGZ56CXg0
London Bridge to Bodiam. Bit gloomy in London, smog?

Hop Pickers Barbecue (1955) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PL3gK1J_dxY
Nice colour footage.

Hop Pickers (1957) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEaj3pXRR2s
Paddock wood.

Hop Stringers Championship (1961) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BqSWXpWfw6M

Offline TonyYoung

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #39 on: March 16, 2014, 08:26:11 »
I don't know whether this should lead to a new thread but this set of posts immediately brought to my mind the song
'Hopping down in Kent'

I first heard it at the Faversham Folk Club when they met at Oare, sung by 'Mingled', an unaccompanied group of four.

The words are

HOPPING DOWN IN KENT
 (Trad)

 Hopping's just beginning; we've got some time to spend.
 We've only come down hopping to earn a quid if we can.
 With a T I AY T I AY T I E I AY

 Early Monday morning just at six o'clock,
 You'll hear them hoppers calling, "Get up and boil your pots."
 With a T I AY T I AY T I E I AY

 Every Tuesday morning the Tally he'll come round,
 With a bag of money and he'll plop it on the ground.
 With a T I AY T I AY T I E I AY

 Says, "Do you want some money?" "Yes, sir, if you please,
 To buy a hock of bacon and a lump of moldy cheese."
 With a T I AY T I AY T I E I AY

 Now here comes our old Measure with his long nose and chin,
 And his ten-gallon basket and don't you pop 'em in.
 With a T I AY T I AY T I E I AY

 Now hopping is all over; all the money spent.
 Don't I wish I'd never gone a-hopping down in Kent!
 With a T I AY T I AY T I E I AY

 I say one; I say two; no more hopping I shall do.
 T I AY T I AY T I E I AY

It was also  performed by The Albion Country Band and by Shirley Collins in the late 70s. I wondered if it was really that old and research has popped up this quote
'I remember playing the Albion Dance Band LP when my grandad was around, and he immediately recognised 'Hopping Down in Kent' as a song he used to sing when he spent summers away from Pimlico (contrary to popular opinion, not all London hop-pickers were from the East End!), hop-picking in the Horsmonden area, probably in the 1920s/30s. Apparently, the words could be changed according to circumstances, they weren't set in stone. '

from http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=1789

I now remember a  Morris Song called 'The Nutting Girl' that refers to  'a fair young maiden, and she lived down in Kent' and wondered 'a new thread of Kent related folk songs' ???
I also have (on vinyl) a collection of Kentish folk songs entitled 'The Good Folk of Kent' (sad isn't it?)
Life's different upside down

Offline cliveh

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #38 on: March 15, 2014, 10:49:56 »
There are some great photos of hop-pickling at a farm in Yalding in 1944 on the Imperial War Museum's website

cliveh


Offline kyn

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #36 on: March 14, 2014, 14:39:45 »
Another 4 images

John38

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #35 on: January 10, 2014, 12:40:41 »
The lorries went around Sheerness picking up hop pickers, I remember it well.

Lindy

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #34 on: January 09, 2014, 22:09:19 »
I went to school in Shipbourne in the mid 1950s and we still had 4 weeks summer holiday and 2 weeks hop-pickers, even though few families did hop picking as this was the role of the those from the East End.

Offline smiler

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #33 on: January 07, 2014, 12:01:54 »
Father Richard Wilson of St Augustine's Church, Stepney and three volunteer nurses decided to establish a "Little Hoppers Hospital" in the Kentish village of Five Oak Green in September 1897. At the time they had no idea of the value of their enterprise.  But their arrival co-incided with an outbreak of smallpox and scores of sick children of the hop pickers were nursed back to good health by these Good Samaritans.  Father Wilson who had first come to Kent the year before with the hop pickers was horrified by what he had seen. The only drinking water for the entire camp was drawn from a pond and the only lavatories were the ditches around which drained into the pond.

Offline smiler

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #32 on: September 09, 2013, 14:47:57 »
                    "Black illness" returns to the hop gardens 1866.
The "black illness is back in Kent. Despite the efforts of specially appointed inspectors to seize bad food from itinerant vendors, cholera has appeared in Mid Kent and is particularly rampant in the "hopping" villages of Yalding, Hunton, Nettlestead, Teston, Marden, Staplehurst, Otford, Bearsted and Barming.
   
The disease was first reported in London and aboard the Queen of the Colonials at Gravesend. From London it was carried by barge to Faversham, Sittingbourne, Maidstone, Sheerness and Aylesford.
     
In Chatham, three dispensaries were opened and the roads watered with diluted carbolic acid. It was to no avail.

In September the Maidstone guardians persuaded the South Eastern Railway to take as many hop pickers as possible directly to the hop gardens to protect the town. They did, but the workers were idle for some time because of heavy rains and spent many hours sitting in their hovels or old Crimean tents. The rain came in and so did the "black illness".

Kent 1800-1899 by Bob Ogley.


Offline smiler

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #31 on: September 09, 2013, 14:19:32 »

      It's that time of year again  :)  Scene from a hop garden in Marden 1868

 

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