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Author Topic: Hop Picking Photo  (Read 34122 times)

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Offline smiler

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #32 on: September 09, 2013, 14:47:57 »
                    "Black illness" returns to the hop gardens 1866.
The "black illness is back in Kent. Despite the efforts of specially appointed inspectors to seize bad food from itinerant vendors, cholera has appeared in Mid Kent and is particularly rampant in the "hopping" villages of Yalding, Hunton, Nettlestead, Teston, Marden, Staplehurst, Otford, Bearsted and Barming.
   
The disease was first reported in London and aboard the Queen of the Colonials at Gravesend. From London it was carried by barge to Faversham, Sittingbourne, Maidstone, Sheerness and Aylesford.
     
In Chatham, three dispensaries were opened and the roads watered with diluted carbolic acid. It was to no avail.

In September the Maidstone guardians persuaded the South Eastern Railway to take as many hop pickers as possible directly to the hop gardens to protect the town. They did, but the workers were idle for some time because of heavy rains and spent many hours sitting in their hovels or old Crimean tents. The rain came in and so did the "black illness".

Kent 1800-1899 by Bob Ogley.


Offline smiler

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #31 on: September 09, 2013, 14:19:32 »

      It's that time of year again  :)  Scene from a hop garden in Marden 1868

Offline busyglen

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #30 on: May 29, 2013, 18:39:46 »
What a great film....thank you!  :)
A smile is a curve that straightens things out.

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #29 on: May 29, 2013, 14:14:05 »
"in the Hop Fields of Kent". A very interesting piece of film from the same source as the two recent ones re St. Barts. Hospital and The River Medway.
 
https://community.brighton.ac.uk/medway/pg/groups/28/in-the-hop-fields-of-kent/

Offline smiler

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #28 on: May 14, 2013, 14:02:38 »

    Londoners on the way to hop gardens 1867

Offline ann

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #27 on: May 08, 2013, 15:36:15 »
   1835  Wife swapping is common in the hoppers huts.
 
And there's me thinking it started in the Swinging Sixties.

Offline smiler

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #26 on: May 08, 2013, 13:01:28 »
 
  1835  Wife swapping is common in the hoppers huts.
  Morality is low in the camps. Wife swapping is commonplace and many women have to lock themselves in at night to escape the attention of men. This year there have been several impromptu weddings, supervised by the binmen who have allowed some men to take more than one wife.

Offline ann

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #25 on: March 05, 2013, 17:00:38 »
Thanks for that thought Busyglen, hadn't thought of Harvest Festival.  She seems to be standing in a field of sorts, with what looks like huts in the background. There is also a lady standing to one side and looking at her shoes and coat length makes me think maybe the date is sometime in the 1920/30's.

Offline busyglen

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #24 on: March 05, 2013, 15:24:39 »
Ann, as your gt. grandmother is warmly attired and has fruit and hops in her hands, I wondered if it was to do with Harvest Festival, although it doesn't appear to be near a Church.  Just a thought.:)
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Offline alkhamhills

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #23 on: March 04, 2013, 20:55:47 »
Dover Express 11.9.1936
Hop Pickers from Dover, at Ash

Offline ann

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #22 on: February 17, 2013, 13:54:57 »
Attached a photo of my great grandmother, obviously posing with a bunch of hops in one hand and an apple in the other. She is obviously not a 'hopper' and I have no idea of the date of the photo, but assume it symbolizes the 'Garden of Kent'.  I wonder if anyone has any ideas from the background buildings etc., where it could have been taken? 

Offline Ted H

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #21 on: February 17, 2013, 11:51:34 »
Not all hop pickers came from London. A lot of local people from Luton, Chatham also took part, both before and just after the war. Attached photo taken c.1935 shows four local children from Beacon Rd. Luton. Back row L to R Anne Parkinson [later to become my wife], Margaret Thomas. Front row L to R Billy Thomas, Billy Harris. Alas, the two girls have passed away. I don't know what happened to the boys.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2013, 22:17:43 »
Hop Picking in Kent (1929).
 A short but rather charming Empire News film.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=miRaKUqqfqc&feature=related

Offline Far away

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #19 on: October 29, 2012, 13:39:21 »
My dad spent 6 months doing jobs like hand hoeing and stone removal from fields for 6 months before deciding that farming was not the job for him. As a family we never looked back.

My mum used to have a picture of her dad in about 1908 with a trolley for ale that he would take from his father's pub in Patrixbourne to the hop pickers, though I don't know whether he was taking orders or just selling what he had from the trolley when he arrived.

Offline Wardy

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Re: Hop Picking Photo
« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2012, 13:20:44 »
Please God I never see those days again, hated it. It was fine when it was our mum and her sisters there, had the run of the farms with all our mates but as soon as our dads turned up on their annual leave from the dockyard it was another matter, child labour they'd call it these days. And what about the journey to and from the fields, in the back of high sided trucks, Lenton and Curtis were mostly used and if it rained we got out of them like drowned rats. Kids of today have got a lot to thank mechanisation for, don't know they're born.

 

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