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Rudely but deeply they laboured, and their labour stand till now.
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Author Topic: Bulls Nose Locks  (Read 33043 times)

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Offline cliveh

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #47 on: September 18, 2014, 09:50:50 »
Anyone know when the Signal Station dates from please?

cliveh

Offline kyn

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #46 on: May 05, 2014, 15:10:46 »
 :)

Offline cliveh

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #45 on: January 07, 2014, 14:46:18 »
A few photos from last year:

cliveh

Offline pr1uk

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #44 on: August 29, 2013, 11:37:58 »
Seeing the photos of Bulls Nose brings back happy memories for me when I was a rigger. I worked in the old rigging house sub station under the reservoir (yes there was a reservoir on the top of the building) in the building between the locks. Then when I transferred to PAS, later RMAS, I either towed ships in or out and travelled through the locks many times each week when I ran a fuel barge. Was on the tug Mastiff when the north lock had to have all the cat's removed and opened both ends so the Hartland Point could canal through as it was too large to fit otherwise. Our normal skipper Peter Maas was the pilot and what a hairy job that must have been, but he made a good job of it as normal. 
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Offline cliveh

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #43 on: August 29, 2013, 09:01:59 »
I have been looking at the pic of the capstan being used to close the gates. I think it was posed. There is a crane lorry very close to the far side of the gate and his jib is fouling the seaway, second point is the gents are all well covered up. If they had been working a capstan for any real time they would have had their overcoats off. Also has anyone noted that it looks like the average age of the gents seems to be somewhere close to 60 (ish). Other than that it does give a good idea of the labour needed to shift these gates.

S4.



"All hands to the capstan" ... from Periscope, February 1977.

Perhaps some of you will recall the following item, which appeared in Chatham’s newspaper ... perhaps you were even one of those labourers? 

It was just like going back to Nelson’s day at Bull Nose just before Christmas.  The hydraulic system failed, preventing the out caisson of the north lock from closing – and it had to be closed by hand.

Eighty pairs of hands, to be exact, for two teams of 40 labourers, summonded from all over the Dockyard, were needed to turn the capstan.

The frigate HMS Lincoln had just passed through the lock when a valve failed in the hydraulic system.  An SOS for “all hands to the capstan” went out to the Dockyard at 9.15a.m. and the first team of 40 labourers was in action by 9.50a.m.

It was no easy task turning the capstan, heaving and straining against the capstan bars held in by a “swifter”.  It was work that became progressively harder, too, for with the tide falling, there was less and less water to support the caisson.

Even with two teams in action, including one or two women labourers, it was not until 11:05a.m. – one hour and fifteen mintes later – that the job was completed.

The capstan bars were the same type as used in Nelson’s day.

“In fact, all that was missing was the fiddler who used to sit on the capstan playing music to spur the men on” commented Harry Hide, Shipping Master."


cliveh



Offline blade1

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #42 on: July 08, 2012, 09:52:36 »
And here is a photo..........
Good photo. please keep us updated with more photos...especially of the crane lift back into position.

Saergytha

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #41 on: July 06, 2012, 23:53:16 »
I remember HMS Triumph being "canalled" through the lock.  It looked as if there was only about 3/4 feet either side.  Quite a feat of seamanship to manoeuvre a ship 600ft long through such a narrow gap!

Offline MedwayDweller

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #40 on: July 06, 2012, 20:27:40 »
Can confirm they arrived in no 3 basin just after 1500 hours this afternoon. Saw them on the way back into work after lunch.
 
nostalgia's not what it used to be

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #39 on: July 06, 2012, 13:08:43 »
A Squadron of Dutch navy ships is due in through the Bulls Nose soon. Not too sure of the date though. Does anyone know please?

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #38 on: June 30, 2012, 11:19:25 »
I have been looking at the pic of the capstan being used to close the gates. I think it was posed. There is a crane lorry very close to the far side of the gate and his jib is fouling the seaway, second point is the gents are all well covered up. If they had been working a capstan for any real time they would have had their overcoats off. Also has anyone noted that it looks like the average age of the gents seems to be somewhere close to 60 (ish). Other than that it does give a good idea of the labour needed to shift these gates.

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline cliveh

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #37 on: June 27, 2012, 09:47:45 »
And here is a photo..........

Great photo MedwayDweller - thanks for posting it!

cliveh

Offline MedwayDweller

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #36 on: June 26, 2012, 19:34:35 »
And here is a photo..........

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Offline MedwayDweller

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #35 on: June 26, 2012, 19:26:19 »
After a good few months planning, one of the lock gates is out of the water and undergoing some serious repairs. The sheer size is hard to comprehend unless you are actually standing alongside. Wonderful to think that these were constructed by good old British labour at the height of Queen Victoria's reign over 150 years ago and here they are being refurbished in order to serve for many more years hopefully. Two mammoth Dutch crane barges were utilised in lifting it out of the water and it is estimated the weight is approaching 800 tonnes.
nostalgia's not what it used to be

Offline MedwayDweller

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #34 on: August 06, 2011, 00:46:21 »




A couple of shots of a vessel locking out. She had been in the docks undergoing some repairs or maintenance.
nostalgia's not what it used to be

Offline MedwayDweller

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Re: Bulls Nose Locks
« Reply #33 on: August 06, 2011, 00:40:41 »


Here is a shot of the area seen in a previous photo where many dockyard labourers were seen turning a capstan to move the lock gates after hydraulics failure. I would have liked to have photographed the machinery inside as plates have been removed for access but I didn't want to push my luck as the dock management are in the offices on the bull nose just a few feet away.
nostalgia's not what it used to be

 

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