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Author Topic: Chislet Colliery  (Read 20489 times)

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Offline DS239

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Re: Chislet Colliery
« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2012, 01:45:30 »
A couple of photos of the ex-Cadbury Bourneville Peckett 0-4-0ST [2156/55] at Chislet:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/60790501@N04/5686655306/sizes/l/in/pool-1191229@N23/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/31514768@N05/4644098901/

This second photo shows it painted in a silver colour to match the Yorkshire Engine Co. 0-6-0ST that also worked there.

IanDB

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Re: Chislet Colliery
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2012, 17:01:46 »
Pit bottom roadways at Chislet Colliery leading to the East and South east Districts of the mine.


Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Chislet Colliery
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2012, 18:48:36 »
From what I understand, talking to my Father who was an Engineer at St Augustine's, the main reason for the demise of Chislet was the coal itself. He has told me that it was Top Grade Steam and Coking Coal. One of the main buyers of the steam coal was the Southern Railway, steam ended in '68, and the fact that around that time we were converting to Natural Gas, thereby ending the need for coking coal. The best steam coal in the country however was produced at Betteshanger, 1900's I believe was the seam. I have a chart here somewhere listing the Calorific Value, Ash content, clinker content and several other factors. It makes interesting reading and is very surprising to find that we had the best coal in the UK right here in Kent.

As soon as I find the chart I will scan it and post it here, all I have to do is remember which book it is in.

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Chislet Colliery
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2012, 17:22:07 »
That's nice to hear IanDB, to be honest I'd not thought of it being a 'community spirit' thing, I can't say there's an awful lot of that spirit around these days. The only time I experience it in my local area is when it's snowing like the clappers and I meet people out on a nice walk in it ( I like snow  :))
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

IanDB

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Re: Chislet Colliery
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2012, 16:40:49 »
we had a trip to Chislet Colliery to show off our skills at dancing round a Maypole  :) I really can't think why it happened now , why would miners be interested in seeing something like that ?

Lyn.....you'd be surprised. There was a fabulous community spirit in the mining villages. Sports days were arranged, dance competitions and a whole host of other events took place throughout the year. The Colliery Welfare Club was built in the late '50's to support the village and it's miners and as far as I know is still active today.

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Chislet Colliery
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2012, 10:24:48 »
It seems really odd to me, that when I was at school ( an awful long time ago now ) in Broadstairs, we had a trip to Chislet Colliery to show off our skills at dancing round a Maypole  :) I really can't think why it happened now, why would miners be interested in seeing something like that? I don't suppose for one minute that we were fantastic at it either  :) it would have been late 50s.

That really is a great pic of the Waiting Miner thanks for sharing it IanDB  :)
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

IanDB

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Re: Chislet Colliery
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2012, 08:17:40 »
It's very hard to stand in the way of progress, but so much is lost in the process. You'd hardly know that there had been a large coal industry in East Kent as the pit head buildings have been demolished to make way for the shiny sheds of small industrial parks.
There are many and varied political and economic reasons for the decimation of the coal industry generally and it's thanks to a few in the former coal mining areas who are keeping the heritage alive. There are contributors to this forum who worked in the industry for far longer than I did, but who would I'm sure agree when I say that the closure of a pit is like the disintegration of a close family.
On the last day shift at Chislet we made our work places secure then made our way to the pit bottom for the last ride to the surface. There was none of the usual happy banter that went with the end of a shift, but men in a state of bewilderment that it had all come to an end. Sure there were some who were glad to be out of a dangerous and dirty environment, but many questioned what on earth happens now......all they had ever done was win coal, like their Fathers and Grandfathers before them. All were angry and many threw their tools and work clothes into the sides of the tunnels, declaring that they would never need them again, albeit that there were teams of people on the pit top waiting to interview each miner and determine their choices of which other pit they would like to transfer to, or what help could be given in finding alternative work.
A few, including myself, remained at the pit on underground salvage work for some weeks after the closure and it was a strange place to work. None of the noise of coal production, but an eerie silence broken by the sounds of mother nature slowly closing down and re-capturing her territory after 50 years of coal extraction. Mice becoming more bold as their food in the form of discarded snap declined, even a different rapport between men unburdened of the desire to save their pit from closure.
The pits and the buildings may have gone, but in those who are still around the camaraderie  and respect for each other remains.......... witness the  Kent Miners Gala that was started by a dedicated few in 2009, 20 years after the last pit in Kent closed, and then the re-location of the statue of The Waiting Miner to a more fitting place at Fowlmead Park near Deal, a park regenerated from the former Betteshanger Colliery spoil tip.

This picture of the Waiting Miner was originally displayed on the "Coalfield Heritage Initiative Kent" site and photographed after it's move from the entrance to Richborough power station to a position on Dover sea front near the National Union of Mineworkers offices.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Chislet Colliery
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2012, 22:35:21 »
This is great stuff IanDB. The closure of the pit marked the end of coal fired boilers at St Augustine's Hospital at Chartham. They had several Lancashire boilers as well as a couple of Babcox and Wilcox Watertube boilers. All were fed by Chislet coal bought in on a couple of the old Bullnose Thames Tippers. I can just remember them all working, as well as the tippers and the steam locos at the pit (I was four in '69). It also marked the end of the brick chimney as well, this was one of the saddest results of the old boilers going as it was much better looking than the steel replacement. Thanks for all you are doing on this thread.

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Chislet Colliery
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2012, 13:53:29 »
I remember seeing one of the two locos at Chislet high on the slag heap propelling a couple of trucks. It was NCB No 2, 0-4-0 Bagnall saddle tank, the other was No 27 (NCB number as her full BR number was 31027) an ex-SECR class P 0-6-0. Both, according to my source, made it into preservation on the Bluebell Railway in Sussex.

Sentinel S4.

Ref book; Branch Lines around Canterbury, Middleton Press.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

steamengineerpmw

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Re: Chislet Colliery
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2012, 13:37:59 »
Following closure of the Chislet pit the slag heap remained in place all around the old colliery for a good number of years. Am I correct in remembering a steam locomotive sitting out of use and just visible on the slag heap - when viewed from the A28 if travelling towards Canterbury from Margate? Does anyone know the details of the engine concerned and whether it was scrapped on site or removed, perhaps for preservation?


ginic

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Chislet Colliery
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2011, 14:07:55 »
Chislet Colliery was classed as gas free until 1941 up until then personal lighting was supplied by carbide (Acetylene) hand and cap lamps until a face in the Main West District had a flash over and one of the men was burned. Flame lamps were then banned in that district and electric flame safety lamps were supplied to the men. The other two districts continued to use carbide lamps for a while but eventually the pit was classified as gaseous and flame safety lamps were supplied to all the men. One thing to note is although the colliery supplied the carbine for the lamps the men had to pay six and a half pence a week off their docket for it.
In 1962 the coal board decided to introduce into the South East district a 24inch gauge overhead single wire loco system with the roadways being driven higher and wide enough to eliminate the risk of gas problems the colliery was supplied with four 67 hp 16ton locos with a central positioned pantograph running on the over head single wire conductor,  these locos in tandem could pull 30 minecars up the 1 in 40 gradient

Ginic

 

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