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Author Topic: Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden  (Read 12533 times)

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Offline DS239

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Re: Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #20 on: December 01, 2014, 20:55:58 »
A recent photo of the remaining colliery building.

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #19 on: July 23, 2012, 09:01:13 »
Going by alkhamhill's photos the sites of the shafts could now be covered by the spoil i saw being dumped.I believe the lorries started at the top end of the valley nearest to the long building.I just had a look at Google Earth Historical Imagery going back to 2002 and the spoil dumping can be seen.2002 was the year i left the Railways.A later image shows the lorry tracks across the dumped spoil.The latest G.E. image shows a round area out in the field, which now looks to be grass covered.

Offline alkhamhills

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Re: Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2012, 20:59:09 »
This pic shows the railway mainline passing through Stonehall. Shows the miners houses

Offline alkhamhills

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Re: Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2012, 20:52:01 »
a better pic of the chimney being demolished

Offline alkhamhills

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Re: Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #16 on: July 20, 2012, 20:45:02 »
another of Stonehall at work

Offline alkhamhills

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Re: Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #15 on: July 20, 2012, 20:43:56 »
Stonehall colliery at work . Miners houses are at top in straight line. My Grandfather was a pumpman in the colliery

Offline alkhamhills

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Re: Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #14 on: July 20, 2012, 20:31:03 »
demolition of chimney stonehall colliery 1920

Offline alkhamhills

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Re: Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #13 on: July 20, 2012, 20:23:49 »
building Stonehall Chimney in 1913. Sorry a bit fuzzy

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #12 on: July 20, 2012, 11:36:37 »
I don't where the shafts were situated but when i worked on the trains i used to see tipper trucks using the rough track from the old A2.Their spoil was dumped in the bottom of the valley and this went on for years and a considerable area was covered if i remember rightly.One thing i am sure about was the stench from that pig farm near where the track leaves the old A2 by the railway bridge!

Stella

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Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #11 on: July 16, 2012, 10:22:51 »
In respect to the shafts of the Stonehall mine, I played around them when I was a child as my grandparents lived in one (of two) bungalows on the property and as I remember, there were two shafts, and they were definately not capped.  There is also a story in our family that my grandfather rescued a small boy who had fallen down one of the shafts, but I don't think he could have fallen all the way in as I remember throwing stones down the shafts and they took quite a few seconds to reach the bottom! The tangled mass of barbed wire that had been thrown down the shafts was still visible and we were told that this was the wire used around the coast as part of the defenses during WWII.  Are the shafts now capped?  I expect that local authorities would not let them remain open.

omega4040

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Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2011, 20:32:03 »
I know for a fact that one of the shafts wasn't capped, because the farmer has to continually top up the soil everytime it subsides. Apparently a lot of the old WW2 era beach defenses went in to the shaft, along with a lot of redundant ammunition!

Offline alkhamhills

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Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2011, 11:08:29 »
The colliery chimney was demolished in 1928--see my pic above

Offline alkhamhills

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Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2011, 21:44:34 »
My Grandfather, Alfred Jackson Brigham, left the Royal Navy in 1919, and moved from Walsall to Lydden. As at Jan 1920, he was employed as a Pump fitter in Stonehall colliery. It was said that he had an accident in the mine, as a result of which he had to leave the colliery. The family lived in one of the Miner's houses
So, clearly some work was going on in the coalmine. Presumably there must have been a future in the mine when he moved from Walsall, and the houses still owned by the mining company
I have some pics of the mine.

Offline LenP

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Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2011, 21:23:21 »
The freehold on the land at Stonehall belonged to the Kent Coal Concessions company, created in 1904 by Arthur Burr to exploit the coal seams discovered in 1890 during the boring of the first Channel Tunnel. The company owned the rights on numerous sites within the eventual coalfield and due to the works at Tilmanstone, Snowdown and Guildford money ran out before the Stonehall site could be developed. The freehold on the land is also presumed to have nearly expired when it was sold on to a subsidary company, Stonehall Colliery Limited, in July 1913, after coal had been discovered in a test boring started sometime in 1912. A second test boring was thus started and plans for the construction of the colliery were put in place. In February 1914 Stonehall was again sold, this time to the French financed Stonehall Colliery Ltd. and work began on constructing the colliery (at the same time, another French backed concern purchased the rights to an undeveloped site at Adisham). As noted the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914 halted all work at Stonehall. Three shafts had been started. One reached 183 ft and was used as a reservoir of water to supply the boilers on site. The second reached 273 ft and the last only 75 ft. Considerable trouble was caused by the ingress of water into the workings and although much tubbing had been ordered it was never delivered and was subsequently sold for scrap. Much of the machinery was removed during the First World War. The halt on the Canterbury - Dover mainline, Stonehall and Lydden Halt originally constructed to serve housing for the miners at the colliery, was closed in 1954.

Stitched together from The East Kent Railway Volumes 1 & 2 Lawson-Finch and Garrett, Oakwood Press, 2003.

Offline unfairytale

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Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2011, 20:25:02 »
I'm sure I've read that other collieries did this. Guilford Colliery being one. It seems odd to sink a shaft to provide water for an engine which was used to pump water from the other 'working' shafts.
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