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Author Topic: Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden  (Read 12536 times)

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Offline unfairytale

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Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2011, 19:06:44 »
TR 271457. Abandoned colliery, Lydden. Stonehall Colliery. A bore hole was sunk here in 1913 and three shafts were subsequently sunk to a maximum depth of 273 ft. Trouble was experienced due to the ingress of water and no coal was ever won from here; c.1920, the site was abandoned and the shafts sealed. The brick foundations of the head gear for two shafts still exist together with a derelict brick engine house. The third shaft was to supply feed water to the boiler. The workshop buildings still remain in fairly good condition. On the hillside above are the remains of a large storage tank, with a brick-capped circular concrete wall c.30 yd diameter and 20 - 25 ft high; the wall is breached at one point. (TR 27104563)

From KCC website.

When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
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Offline unfairytale

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Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2011, 19:00:49 »
In the thirties experiments were carried-out on the site to see if pit flooding could be prevented by freezing the ground. (Info from the same book.)
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/unfairytale/sets/

Offline unfairytale

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Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2011, 18:50:03 »
Oops I should have said. My info came from the book, Those Dirty Miners. A History Of The Kent Coalfield By J.P. Hollingsworth. ISBN 9781840335088.
A great read.

Wiki doesn't mention the French owners nor the company name.

Coincidently, I rode out there last weekend on my bike to take a photo of the remaining building. When I finaly got there I realised I'd left my camera at home!
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/unfairytale/sets/

Offline busyglen

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Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2011, 18:45:27 »
Work started there in 1913 by two French men who owned the firm, Stonehill Colliery Ltd. but they gave-up at the start of the First World War. Three shafts were dug, one shaft was 75ft deep but the other two reached 273ft. No coal was found.

Work was resumed after the war but by 1921 the equipment was removed and most of the buildings demolished. Only that long workshop survives.

We found the same source!  :) :)
A smile is a curve that straightens things out.

Offline unfairytale

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Stone Hall Coalmine, Lydden
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2011, 18:39:48 »
Work started there in 1913 by two French men who owned the firm, Stonehill Colliery Ltd. but they gave-up at the start of the First World War. Three shafts were dug, one shaft was 75ft deep but the other two reached 273ft. No coal was found.

Work was resumed after the war but by 1921 the equipment was removed and most of the buildings demolished. Only that long workshop survives.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/unfairytale/sets/

 

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