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Author Topic: Aveling & Porter  (Read 26247 times)

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Offline MartinR

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #39 on: September 08, 2017, 18:12:42 »
The Ruston flyer makes it clear that it is a "Diesel" or "compression ignition" engine.  The old ones burnt nearly anything, it was only with the advent of modern diesels after WWII that they started to become fussy.  Petrol was much more expensive and was only used for starting.  My experience with starting something similar goes back to an old Fordson tractor used by the Kennet & Avon Trust in the 1970s.  You started hand cranking the cold engine with the petrol supply and spark plugs enabled.  Once it fired, you allowed it to run up to speed and temperature before switching over to Tractor Vaporising Oil (TVO) which was basically paraffin.  Once on TVO it was a pure diesel, no plugs required.

In the flyer it mentions starting the smallest rollers with a vaporiser.  This system was used on a lot of single cylinder diesels and consisted of a small chamber into which the fuel was injected.  The chamber was heated by a blow torch before starting to crank.  Once running the heats of prior combustion and of compression kept it hot enough.

Offline grandarog

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #38 on: September 08, 2017, 18:08:11 »
Source Geograph ,Chris Whippett.

Online 80sChild

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #37 on: September 08, 2017, 14:50:46 »
Here's one attached to an early oil engined A & P.The earlier ones would have been of similar appearance.The depth would have been adjusted using the wheel

(Image removed from quote.)

Now THAT is just like the one at the Brook Pumping station. Is the same kind of design, almost identical.  :)

Offline conan

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #36 on: September 08, 2017, 14:18:56 »
Not sure but try page 9 of this link.It's not an A & P but the principle should be the same

http://beamishtransportonline.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Ruston-Hornsby-Crude-Oil-Rollersopt.pdf
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Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #35 on: September 08, 2017, 13:39:03 »
I'm intrigued by the "Crude" oil. Presumably this had a burner to heat the water to steam, which used 3500 sec "really thick" oil much the same as a lot of hospitals used for their boilers many years ago? As it was so thick, you had to have a heat trace on the pipes/tank to make it flow well enough for the " spinning cup" or? on the burner.

Offline conan

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #34 on: September 08, 2017, 00:24:34 »
Here's one attached to an early oil engined A & P.The earlier ones would have been of similar appearance.The depth would have been adjusted using the wheel

To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline MartinR

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #33 on: September 07, 2017, 21:18:00 »
The scarification unit would be the rod or rods you see at the back of a roller to scratch the surface.  It was used to break up a surface either prior to excavation, or to ensure a good "key" for a replacement surface.  For a modern take on the same task see http://www.bobcat.com/attachments/scarifier/features.

Online 80sChild

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #32 on: September 07, 2017, 14:32:50 »
In case anyone interested I think there's an Aveling and Porter steam roller on display at the Brook Pumping Station in Chatham (next to the multi-story car park).
I remember going there a lot back in the 90's and you can still see it displayed in their courtyard.

Might be worth checking out for enthusiasts.  :)

Offline Signals99

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #31 on: September 07, 2017, 11:57:27 »
Hi just a point of family interest, my uncle  Bert Newman  served an apprenticeship with Aveling and Porter and worked for them all his working life, I think he ended  his days with them in some form of management position. As a lad my mother told me he was responsible for the idea and production of the scarification unit fitted to road rollers, any idea as to what a scarafication unit was or did ?
I never actually met the chap (family feud, that unfortunately lasted a life time) but would love to have information on him, or his work.

Offline conan

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #30 on: September 07, 2017, 00:10:21 »
I wonder which type it was? this first is dated 1867



Whilst this is dated 1873



Hopefuly Sentinal S4 or Dave the train can help :)
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #29 on: September 06, 2017, 21:48:56 »
Maidstone Telegraph - Saturday 11 March 1871

Aveling and Porter's Steam Road Rollers. -Messrs Aveling and Porter, of this city, having just completed the manufacture of some of their powerful steam road rollers for use in London, the machine was tested on Star-hill on Friday last. A great portion of Star-hill has recently been covered with stones to a depth of six inches, and notwithstanding that the roadway is a steep incline of 1 in 10 the steam roller kept ascending and descending the hill with the greatest of ease, until the surface of the road was rendered perfectly smooth. It would seem that not one of the public bodies in Rochester or Chatham has yet employed the steam road roller for the streets, although a promise was given by the commissioners of pavements that they would hire one of the steam rollers, providing one was purchased for the town of Maidstone. This the Local Board of Maidstone has done, but up to the present time the roller had not been once hired by the Commissioners, while the expence of the whole of the road rolling in this city has been borne by Messrs Aveling and Porter.

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Offline conan

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #28 on: June 04, 2017, 00:10:07 »
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Offline smiffy

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #27 on: June 03, 2017, 21:09:01 »
Looks like it was a bit too expensive despite the superior performance. Very interesting to see that Frank Perkins was an Aveling and Porter executive.

Offline conan

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Offline smiffy

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #25 on: June 03, 2017, 16:02:03 »
Does anyone know if Aveling and Porter put this into production or was it just a one-off prototype?

 

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