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Author Topic: Aveling & Porter  (Read 15948 times)

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Offline conan

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To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline smiffy

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #25 on: June 03, 2017, 16:02:03 »
Does anyone know if Aveling and Porter put this into production or was it just a one-off prototype?

Offline smiffy

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #24 on: April 06, 2017, 00:56:45 »
From the South Eastern Gazette, 2nd September 1862:



Offline kyn

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #23 on: August 16, 2013, 22:04:39 »
A trip to the Science Museum in London resulted in seeing this:

Quote
Aveling and Porter Traction Engine, 1871

This is the oldest surviving traction engine to show all the features that became standard practice for the following 60 years.  It was designed by Thomas Aveling who was a pioneer in the application of steam power to ploughing, road haulage and driving agricultural machinery.

Traction engines were often used as a portable power source for various machines, driven by a long belt from the flywheel.  The engines would travel from farm to farm at harvest time, where they would drive a threshing machine (which separated the wheat from the chaff and stalks).  For many people, the traction engine was probably their first encounter with the ‘machine age’.  In Tess of the Urbervilles, published in 1891, Thomas Hardy described the harsh pace of the new machinery as Tess helped to feed corn into the threshing machine.  ”It was the ceaselessness of the work that tried her so severely….For Tess there was no respite; for, as the drum never stopped, the man who fed it could not stop, and she, who had to supply the man with untied sheaves, could not stop either.”

Traction engine were often used to haul heavy industrial equipment and also pulled ‘road trains’ consisting of several wagons, although their speed was slow – about 4 mph (6.5 km/h).  Aveling and Porter exported steam engines all over the world from their factory in Rochester, Kent.  The firm also pioneered the steam road-roller – really a traction engine with heavy rollers for wheels – and in this way steam literally ‘paved the way’ for the cat and the diesel truck.

Offline kyn

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #22 on: September 10, 2012, 17:57:34 »
A trip to the Essex County Show, thanks to those at the pumping station, and we came across this little display :)














Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #21 on: September 17, 2011, 09:08:50 »
Don't forget she was sliding on greasy wood sett covered with who knows what and steel rails, and the remains of her living van would have acted as an anchor. That said I think he was being looked after that day............
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Offline chasg

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2011, 04:25:55 »
The fact that no one was killed and the roller stayed on her feet is amazing.

Some would say miraculous!

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #19 on: September 16, 2011, 19:11:50 »
I have posted this in the Star Hill thread but it deserves to be here as well. This tale needs to be told. Many years ago I was told of a relative who got into some bother with a roller on Star Hill. For many years I thought, and believed, that it was my Gt.Gt. Grandfather. I was wrong. It was his brother Herbert (Herbie) who lived, mainly, in Gillingham. He died in 1945(ish) so there might be people around who remember him, if you think you do please PM me and we can have a chat. I have left a few of the more personal details out, my surname for one, as this was part of a much longer email from The Oracle. He has been filling in parts of my family history because, being almost 80, he wants me to know as much as possible.


Uncle Herbie and my mother’s father are furthest back people I met.

 Herbie was, I think, my grandfather's younger brother – but I could be wrong.   He lived in, I believe, Gillingham.   He appeared every so often.   He was of medium height, tending to be fat.   Had a shock of white hair, a heavy white mustache on a roundish face and blue, friendly, eyes.   Herbie was always good to me.   I remember him well because he ‘stopped appearing’ towards the end of the war by which time I was, of course quite a mature kid.   (Had I not seen someone’s head blown off etc, etc?)

Herbie had lead a charmed life. He had never married but was, obviously (looking back at him) a ‘ladies man’.  He was a steam fitter, having served his time with Aveling & Porter’s.  He moved around a lot working on such things as the construction of the Welsh Dams and Pembroke Dock.  But he was ‘in and out’ of Avelings for most of his life.  He worked for their long-term lease department.   Many county councils appeared to own a fleet of rollers.  In fact many councils only hired them (Kent actually owned their 30 plus rollers.   Herbie delivered new rollers to their bases (anywhere in the country) and brought ‘home’ those to be refurbished and sold on.   He thought nothing of roading a roller to, say Cornwall and bringing a well-worn one home.  Herbie had a roller run away on Star Hill, Rochester.  He had brought it from Brighton – Dad told me, years later, that its brakes were clapped out, the valve-gear sloppy and rattling and the steering about a turn and a half slack both ways.  Anyway, she got away from Herbie on Star Hill, but he stuck to her.   She was skidding and slewing on the tram lines and setts and two trams were closing on each other.  The driver of the ‘up’ car could see what the driver of the ‘down’ car could not see – a steam roller hauling a living van coming down the hill more or less sideways on at about 20mph.  He stopped his car and doubtlessly prayed.  Herbie’s roller overtook the ‘down’ car without touching it.  The roller passed through the ever-narrowing gap between the two trams, but the living van side-swiped the ‘up’ car which rocked violently and almost went over on its left side.  It recovered, but Herbie’s living van had taken most of the waist panels off its right side.  The living van was de-stablised by the collision and flipped over to explode in plum-coloured matchboarding, stove, bedding, food and clothes.   The tow-bar remained attached to the roller together with the frame and the four wheels.  This lot was going along on its side when Herbie reached the bottom of the hill.  Ahead of him was a Jeweller’s shop and a tight left or right.  Left into Rochester High Street or right, to Chatham.  As he was, in any case intending to go along Rochester High Street, over the Medway Bridge and thence to Aveling’s works, he decided to GO FOR IT.  The roller, astoundingly, took the corner.  The frame of the living van did not.  It side-swiped the shop which was not, obviously, built as well as the tram.  The front of the shop caved in and jewellery, clocks and watches exploded out into the street.  Herbie finally stopped the roller just in front of a tram that was heading for Star Hill.

No-one was seriously hurt.  The policeman on point-duty at the bottom of Star Hill sprained his ankle sprinting for safety.  Several people on the damaged tram were ‘over-excited’ and the jeweller was found filthy, angry and unhurt.  Herbie was done for dangerous (!!!!) driving, and fined.  Aveling’s did NOT pay the fine.  It was deemed as absolutely none of the Company’s business.



Now I believe that this was quite a heavy shunt for the time and would have been reported in the local paper(s). If anyone can add to this please do. The fact that no one was killed and the roller stayed on her feet is amazing. This could also belong in the Medway trams thread but posting this twice is pushing my luck as it is. Are there any pics extant of either the roller in the High Street or the damaged tram?

Thanks for your time, S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

manokent

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #18 on: July 30, 2011, 15:55:41 »
Sorry I can't tell you much more about the photo - if you can find out more that would be great.
All I know is that the Bridge Tavern is Church Street, Hoo and it took grandfather two days to get to Style & Winch brewery in Maidstone and back (which would have meant using the original Bluebell Hill)

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2011, 20:34:19 »
That is fantastic. That is the first photograph I have ever seen of an Aveling Wagon. As has been stated, a very rare beastie indeed. Thank you for posting it. Sentinel S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline DaveTheTrain

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2011, 19:39:01 »
Manokent,

Thanks very much for posting this, that is a fantastic photograph and extremely rare - Aveling wagons are like hens teeth.  Also, with the single head lamp on the chimney it is very unusual.   Do you know anything of the engine?  If not I can find out via road steam lads.

Thanks again, that is a rare find.

ShotA

manokent

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #15 on: July 29, 2011, 12:59:29 »



manokent

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #14 on: July 29, 2011, 11:44:29 »
I can well recall the A&P steam rollers in Kent. The drivers towed their accommodation wagon (as Fred Dibnah) whilst they worked the area so I got to know some of them well.
They had to frantically turn the wheel to turn the massive chain operated front rollers. lorries were restricted to max 20 mph at that time - i wonder what the max speed was for a roller?
In those days we had proper summers, hot with molten tar on the roads. They rolled the large yellow chippings into the tar - hence permanently scarred knees and tarry summer sandals - not good for marbles either.

I'm ok on steam engines but this internet thing!  If anyone is interested and will please help I will post a picture of grandad's A&P steam dray.(tried insert image paste etc but no luck)



Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #13 on: July 27, 2011, 23:31:16 »
That is William Bray on the footplate and his son at the steering position. Yes Thomas Aveling would have been at the trials. 
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Offline unfairytale

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Re: Aveling & Porter
« Reply #12 on: July 27, 2011, 23:11:37 »
I read or was told that Thomas Aveling was at Broadmead Farm, Folkestone in 1858 when Bray tested his patented wheels, Bray also towed some heavy guns up Dover Hill.

Here's Bray's engine of 1858.
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