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Author Topic: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"  (Read 68162 times)

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Offline peterchall

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #91 on: August 28, 2013, 08:09:41 »
If you know where everything you wish to purchase is the chances are that's all you'll take to the check out.
On the other hand, if you can't find what you want easily, the chances are that you won't bother unless it's something essential. It's similar with another infuriating habit - changing the packaging, so that you don't recognise the product you are looking for. Then there's the practice of putting items on display separately, so that having made a selection from, say, the biscuits shelves you find more of them in a separate rack some distance away, usually half-blocking a gangway.

Regarding corned beef, is that the same as 'bully beef' so familiar to soldiers?
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline smiler

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #90 on: August 28, 2013, 07:38:41 »
Signals when I asked this question I was told its to get the customer to see and hope they will buy other things. If you know where everything you wish to purchase is, the chances are, that's all you'll take to the check out.

Offline Signals99

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #89 on: August 28, 2013, 06:48:34 »
Ron,
Absolutely fascinating, now, one more question and I promise not to bother you any more :)
Did you ever work in a supermarket. If so, can you answer a question that really bugs me?
Why, oh why do they keep moving things about ???? I just get used to where things are and, lo and behold, it's all moved, it really confuses us oldies.
I asked in Sainsburys once, the answer was a condescending look and " if Sir has a problem I can get someone to assist you". Oh for the days of a friendly shop assistant, plus white apron and a "good morning sir, can I help you". Alas, gone with Vyes, Home and Colonial, Maypole and David Griegs,
Ah well! time moves on so must we. :)





Ron Stilwell

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #88 on: August 28, 2013, 00:01:26 »
Ron ,
Can you recall roughly about what time sliced meats began to appear in grocers shops?
My pal who is eighty one says ,apart from corned beef,it wasn't until the early fifties we began to get pre packed sliced meats in shops.
PS what process is involved in ' Corning 'beef .i just love this thread  thanks Ron Stilwell for all your hard work .
It is my recollection that the start of pre-packed sliced meat roughly coincided with the first super-markets (a time I mourn).  They wanted something that the customer could easily pick up, and quickly move on to the next choice.  Saved on the shop assistants too.
I think that would be about 1960 or so, at least it was in Westbrook.
Corned beef?  Well, that was another thing to do with preservation.  Keeping the meat for as long as possible.  The Navy used to use it.  It's usually brisket that is salted.  The 'corn' are the crystals of salt.

Offline Signals99

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #87 on: August 27, 2013, 23:45:49 »
Ron ,
Can you recall roughly about what time sliced meats began to appear in grocers shops?
My pal who is eighty one says, apart from corned beef, it wasn't until the early fifties we began to get pre packed sliced meats in shops.
PS what process is involved in ' Corning ' beef. I just love this thread, thanks Ron Stilwell for all your hard work.

Ron Stilwell

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #86 on: August 27, 2013, 19:26:36 »
Am so enjoying this thread, thanks Ron Stilwell.  Your latest explantation of the term 'green' bacon reminded me of my dear old mum and how she would ask for 'green back bacon'.  I guess this is what she would have meant, unsmoked.
Yes, absolutely.

Offline ann

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #85 on: August 27, 2013, 18:55:51 »
Am so enjoying this thread, thanks Ron Stilwell.  Your latest explantation of the term 'green' bacon reminded me of my dear old mum and how she would ask for 'green back bacon'.  I guess this is what she would have meant, unsmoked. 

Ron Stilwell

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #84 on: August 27, 2013, 18:35:26 »
All very interesting Ron Stilwell and I "thank you". So are you saying when we see rashers of bacon that are going green that this is normal, as I've always thought they were going off.  :)
Very amusing Smiler.  The 'Green' description was because the un-smoked bacon had a pale green appearance in comparison with the brown colour of the 'Smoked', and nothing to do with mould.

busyglen

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #83 on: August 27, 2013, 18:26:50 »
What's next, one asks oneself?  busyglen, what part of a provision assistant's work might be next?

I replied to this earlier, but when I posted it the site dropped and I couldn't get back in!  I should have saved it in Word!!

I mentioned that your posts have reminded me of so many things, but as I was in this job 58 years ago, I'm having a job to remember it all.  :(  I was only in this job for a year, and then went in to a job as an assistant in a Decorators Merchants shop, which I loved, for 11 years.....but I digress. :)

Offline smiler

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #82 on: August 27, 2013, 17:49:27 »
All very interesting Ron Stilwell and I "thank you". So are you saying when we see rashers of bacon that are going green that this is normal, as I've always thought they were going off.  :)

Ron Stilwell

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #81 on: August 27, 2013, 16:48:46 »
Part fourteen minus one :)

This was the era of the ‘Little Lion’ emblem of the British Egg Marketing Board.  This was supposed to denote the quality of the product, but unfortunately it didn’t mean a lot.  Eggs would be delivered in big cardboard egg boxes that held 240 eggs.
They were on papier-mache egg trays each of which held two dozen eggs.  While this wasn’t a problem in the summer, 240 eggs took quite a while to sell in the winter.
This could mean that eggs might be in stock for weeks before they were sold.  We had a couple of ways of checking the condition of the eggs.  One of these was candling.  This involved placing the eggs on a perforated metal rack with a light underneath.  With the light shining through the egg, bad ones could easily be seen and thrown out.  Another way was to put the eggs into a bowl of water.  Any bad eggs would float.
One thing to remember was that there were definite limits to the type of thing that we would stock.  Grocer and Provision Merchants was the official title and one thing we certainly were not was a greengrocer – at that time it was not the done thing to mix the trades.  About the only item in that line that we would stock would be tomatoes.  But even then it would only be at certain times of the year when Jersey tomatoes were in season.  They would come in flimsy wooden trays each holding about 20 lbs of tomatoes and the top row of tomatoes would all be individually wrapped in thin green tissue paper.
At Christmas we would stock a few other fruits such as Fyffes bananas and Jaffa oranges.  Jaffas always came wrapped in highly decorated tissue paper.

Ron Stilwell

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #80 on: August 27, 2013, 16:23:33 »
I hope I'm not going off too much at a tangent, but reading your contributions about curing pork reminded me of another meat preserving technique that is seldom used today; salting beef. I know corned beef is still widely used but I have in mind immersing beef joints in brine. When I was a lad at school in the early 1960's to earn a few bob I had a Saturday job in the local Co op butchers. During the week customers would select a cut of brisket or silverside and ask for it to be salted. The butcher would then insert a number of wooden skewers in the joint and throw it in the brine tub, which was kept in the cold room. A note of the number of skewers used for that particular joint would be written on a raffle ticket which was given to the customer. My pet hate was retrieving the joints from the ice cold brine, feeling for the appropriate number of skewers, before presenting it to the customer.

That's what I like about KHF, it takes us all back through our own personal memory lane.
Very interesting.  I think that many of these techniques were developed for preserving meat for long sea voyages.

Ron Stilwell

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #79 on: August 27, 2013, 16:20:42 »
Many thanks to Ron Stilwell for the explanation of bacon in particular, and his interesting posts in general :)

But I’m still not sure what is the difference between bacon and ham.

All ham except, so far as I know, Parma Ham – which has fat, like bacon – is smooth with no separate fat. A quick glance at Sainsbury’s website lists, among others:
Honey roast ham, cured ham (so there is presumably uncured ham), air dried ham, cooked ham (so there is presumably uncooked ham), and turkey ham (I thought ham only came from pigs). There is also ‘regional’ ham, such as Wiltshire ham and Yorkshire ham, presumably produced using different techniques.
Yes, it is all about different techniques,  As many ways of curing as there are grains of sand, well, quite a few anyway!

Offline peterchall

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #78 on: August 27, 2013, 16:07:31 »
Many thanks to Ron Stilwell for the explanation of bacon in particular, and his interesting posts in general :)

But I’m still not sure what is the difference between bacon and ham.

All ham except, so far as I know, Parma Ham – which has fat, like bacon – is smooth with no separate fat. A quick glance at Sainsbury’s website lists, among others:
Honey roast ham, cured ham (so there is presumably uncured ham), air dried ham, cooked ham (so there is presumably uncooked ham), and turkey ham (I thought ham only came from pigs). There is also ‘regional’ ham, such as Wiltshire ham and Yorkshire ham, presumably produced using different techniques.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Barrowboy

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Re: Vyes "The Kentish Grocer"
« Reply #77 on: August 27, 2013, 14:37:04 »
I hope I'm not going off too much at a tangent, but reading your contributions about curing pork reminded me of another meat preserving technique that is seldom used today; salting beef. I know corned beef is still widely used but I have in mind immersing beef joints in brine. When I was a lad at school in the early 1960's to earn a few bob I had a Saturday job in the local Co op butchers. During the week customers would select a cut of brisket or silverside and ask for it to be salted. The butcher would then insert a number of wooden skewers in the joint and throw it in the brine tub, which was kept in the cold room. A note of the number of skewers used for that particular joint would be written on a raffle ticket which was given to the customer. My pet hate was retrieving the joints from the ice cold brine, feeling for the appropriate number of skewers, before presenting it to the customer.

That's what I like about KHF, it takes us all back through our own personal memory lane.

 

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