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Author Topic: Bevin boys  (Read 10613 times)

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #18 on: August 18, 2015, 22:37:58 »
© IWM (PD 273) 'Bevin Boys' training at a colliery near Canterbury are supervised by experienced instructor Stephen Jones (left) as they load a conveyor at the coal face.

© IWM (PD 274) 'Bevin Boys'  training at a colliery near Canterbury are supervised by experienced instructor Stephen Jones as they work at the coal face.

© IWM (PD 272) Mining instructor Stephen Jones (left) supervises 'Bevin Boys' Hubert Claud Morgan and Jim Walters as they work at the coal face during their training at a colliery near Canterbury. According to the original caption, Mr Jones has had 54 years experience of mining, Hubert was a clerk for Hastings Education Authority and Jim worked in an aircraft factory.

© IWM (PD 271) 'Bevin Boy' Hubert Claud Morgan, aged 18, drives in a roof support at the coal face, during his training at a colliery near Canterbury.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #17 on: August 18, 2015, 22:22:36 »
© IWM (PD 278) 'Bevin Boys' Ernest Underdown (left) and Jim Malthouse learn to work the engine which drives the cables which draw loaded trucks through the mine tunnels as part of their training at a colliery near Canterbury. According to the original caption, Ernest is a former lorry driver from Folkestone and Jim is a former student from Lewisham.

© IWM (PD 277) During training at a colliery near Canterbury, 'Bevin Boy' John Vowler (from Sutton) attaches the hauling rope to a loaded truck. These trucks carry coal from the end of the conveyors to the pit shaft. The large beam on the right is the safety beam which stops the truck from rolling down the slope before everyone is ready.

© IWM (PD276) As part of their training at a colliery near Canterbury, 'Bevin Boy' Bert Swaisland (left) of Welwyn, signals the loaded trucks away from the coal face. He is supervised by an experienced miner.

© IWM (PD 296) A group of 'Bevin Boys' leave the pithead at 10:30am, following their morning shift at the coal face. They are training at a colliery near Canterbury.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2015, 22:03:18 »
© IWM (PD 270) A 'Bevin Boy', Jim Walters, using a pneumatic drill in a colliery in Kent. As the war progressed, coal output dropped because there was no new recruitment of workers for the mines. In 1943 the 'Bevin Boy' scheme was introduced, with one out of every ten young men coming of age for calling up to the forces, being chosen to go into the mines.

© IWM (PD 284) As part of their training at a colliery near Canterbury, 'Bevin Boys' have Physical Training lessons with their ex-army instructor Alex Hamilton. According to the original caption "PT is specialised; is designed to strengthen up the trainees, and to give them experience in handling pit props. Their PT is also useful, for props are brought from the railway wagons and stacked".

© IWM (PD 283) A group of 'Bevin Boys' enjoy their lunchtime meal in the colliery canteen. They have already had a morning of training at the coal face, and are relaxing following a wash and change of clothes before preparing for lectures in the afternoon. According to the original caption, a hot meal in the canteen costs a shilling. On the left, an older miner can be seen collecting some food from the service bar.

© IWM (PD 290) A group of 'Bevin Boys' listen to an afternoon lecture on 'underground transport' as part of their training at a colliery near Canterbury. Their lecturer (back to camera) is Arthur Brooks, who has had 56 years of mining experience.

Stevend

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2012, 11:36:40 »
Many thanks for the link.

Interesting to see in the film a number of 'anti-tank pimples' lying by the bridge over the river.

Steve

Offline Bobdonk

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2012, 08:32:17 »
There are also some stills on the Imperial War Museum site.

I assume it is the same pit as (Al)Bert Swaisland is mentioned in both the film and the stills caption

http://bit.ly/xqo8YA

Bob

Offline sandi_01

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2012, 22:18:16 »
Thanks for the link Bobdonk  :)

Offline Bobdonk

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2012, 21:56:17 »
I guess this is the  right one on Pathe News

www.britishpathe.com/video/bevin-boys

Bob

Offline sandi_01

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2012, 21:09:26 »
Hi ginnic...do you happen to have the link to the Chislet Colliery video? I have a personal interest in this colliery and would love to see some photos or a video.

Thank you!

ginnic

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2012, 10:28:32 »
There is a short film on Utube of bevin boys working at Chislet Colliery Kent.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2011, 17:26:27 »
There were nearly 48000 Bevin Boys, including volunteers.
To choose them, one of Bevin's secretaries would each week pull from a hat one of 10 cards having the digits 0–9, and all men that week whose National Service number ended in that digit were directed to work in the mines. The Bevin Boys were given 6 weeks of training (4 off-site, 2 on). Because they were of military age they were often considered to be scroungers avoiding military service, although it was probably no worse for them than anyone else in a reserved occupation and not allowed to leave their jobs. There was no war pension for those invalided out, but probably not for ‘professional’ miners either.

The famous footballer, Stanley Matthews, served as a Bevin Boy in Kent.

Other famous Bevin Boys were:
Sir Jimmy Saville - DJ
(Lord) Brian Rix - Actor and President of Mencap
Eric Morecambe – Of Morecambe and Wise
Alf Sherwood – Footballer
Nat Lofthouse – Footballer.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

AldwinWalker

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2011, 08:11:09 »
I came to know about the Bevin Boys from my grandparents.They also informed me that they worked in all 4 kent pit.But then also I was not knowing all else matter what you mentioned about them below.Reading all what you mentioned I came to know little more about them.

overman

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2011, 21:59:54 »
To answer your question, yes there were Bevin boys working in all of the 4 Kent pits.
Some continued to stay on working underground until they retired.

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2011, 19:14:45 »
When I registered for National Service at the local Labour Exchange I was handed a leaflet on coal mining which I immediately returned. "Read it", the man said. I politely refused explaining that my Grandfather and Uncles lived in Tonypandy in the Rhondda Valley and were all suffering ill health due to working underground. Nothing more was said. When I was eventually `called up` I met a few lads who had `signed on` as `regulars` in the army rather than continue working in the pit. I didn`t understand why I was given this leaflet as I thought the `Bevin Boy` era had finished.
Many years later I met Ernest Bevin - a big man in every respect. He signed my autograph book with the biggest fountain pen I had ever seen.

.

The other two autographs are of the MP for the Faversham Constituency and his wife. Percy Wells eventually became Ernest Bevin`s Parliamentary Private Secretary.




Offline peterchall

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2011, 15:18:24 »
In the 1945 General Election, Ernie Bevan was elected 'properly' and became Foreign Secretary. Not bad for a man who left school at 11, and read newspapers to older members of his family who couldn't read. As can be imagined, he became famous for his bluntness; there is a story of how someone remarked that Home Secretary Herbert Morrison (Grandfather of Peter Mandelson) was "his own worst enemy", to which Bevan retorted "not while I'm alive 'e ain't".

Back to the Bevin Boys. They were made necessary by muddled government planning - if you can imagine such a thing happening :). At the start of the war coal mining was not a reserved occupation, so miners were called up into the forces like anyone else. This resulted in a shortage which the government tried to rectify by de-mobbing miners, but there were many problems; miners in the forces overseas could not be just sent home without replacing them, some of them preferred to be in the forces anyway, and it was wasteful of the military training they had received. Hence the Bevin Boys. The scheme might not have been so unpopular had they had the same treatment as men in the forces, but I think they had to buy their own food and clothes (a soldier could 'walk-out' in his army issue uniform, but a miner couldn't), and they were not entitled to their pre-call up job back on discharge, as members of the forces were, and got no de-mob gratuity.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

mondeo

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Re: Bevin boys
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2011, 13:15:29 »
Not off topic Peter, because the lead up to any event is as interesting as the event itself.
Yes, I agree about Bevin and "the fiddle" you have mentioned, the press would have a field day !

Got any pictures mr seaford ?  :)

 

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