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Author Topic: No.9 Dock Crane  (Read 10979 times)

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Offline cliveh

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Re: No.9 Dock Crane
« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2014, 07:26:31 »
Yes bromptonboy, I believe it was used for that purpose. No.3 Basin was the 'Fitting-Out' Basin so presume this was where the gun turrets were fitted.

cliveh

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: No.9 Dock Crane
« Reply #11 on: May 22, 2014, 17:16:32 »
Is it possible that this was a specialist crane used for lifting the big gun turrets in and out of ships?

chriscapewell

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Re: No.9 Dock Crane
« Reply #10 on: May 22, 2014, 14:22:21 »

The hydraulic crane was by Tannatt Walker, Leeds in 1894

Chatham Dockyard      North Side of No. 3 Basin
160T Hydraulic   Dual steam ( light lift ), and hydraulic. Tested to 320tons.
Photo-Engraving/Article - 'Engineering', p.262, 23/02/1894
Engraving - 'American Engineer and Railroad Journal'; Vol. LXVIII No.4, p.165, 1894

Offline cliveh

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Re: No.9 Dock Crane
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2013, 11:22:40 »
Just been studying my plans of the basins which show all the cranes etc. In the 1911 plan, the 160 tonne crane shown in the postcard and patmores photo was situated in No.3 Basin. It was the only crane that size in the yard. The giant shears were 130 tonner and were situated in No.1 Basin on the same side as and just up from the No.9 Dock entrance.

No.9 Dock itself had a 20 tonne gantry crane in 1955. The shears were still there then but the 160 tonne crane had gone


cliveh

Offline man-of-kent

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Re: No.9 Dock Crane
« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2011, 20:15:46 »
While I was in the dockyard during the early 70s, someone told me that the sherelegs had been sabotaged by the Germans so that the rudder mechanism didn't function and our dockyard could never fix it.
I do remember the large No.9 dock crane. Our gang walked past it many times on our way to do some loading at the timber yard.
Derek Brice

Offline mikeb

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Re: No.9 Dock Crane
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2011, 16:50:13 »
Yes patmore, it was German and came to the UK after the last war. I believe it was made by the firm "Lobnitz". There were also two tugs, Dipper & Diver which were also war prizes.

patmore

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Re: No.9 Dock Crane
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2011, 15:39:17 »
The floating crane which resembled a large tripod (I refer to the one in use in the later days of the Dockyard), was known as the 'Sheerlegs'. I was once told that it had been commandeered from abroad at the end of one of the world wars and towed back to Chatham, where it remained. Can anyone throw further light on this?

Offline mikeb

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Re: No.9 Dock Crane
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2011, 11:39:22 »
Re the Dockyard cranes:- Philip MacDougal in "The Chatham Dockyard Story" shows the same photo of the sheer legs as Patmore has posted, stating they were located in No. 2 basin. I believe from the buildings in the background they may have been on the south side. He states the battleship to be HMS Irresistible and dates the photo 1902.

The large crane in the same post is not the crane that stood opposite no. 6 dock, adjacent to no. 9 dock, but was I believe its predecessor. Again Philip MacDougal gives a capacity of 160 tons. Looking at this photo, I am intrigued as to how it works. What is that cylindrical item hanging from it, it looks like some form of hydraulic cylinder; it shows in other photos so seems to be part of the crane, not what it is lifting. I cannot see any conventional "hooks and tackles". Any ideas? Its replacement of 120 tons capacity was put up in the 1930's I believe and lasted till closure though was little used in later days. It was used mainly for lifting gun turrets. This crane seems to have been particularly camera shy, I cant find a suitable photo anywhere.

The gantry crane referred to by cliveh was probably the one in the saw mills that lay between No' 9 and the river. Virtually all the Navy's timber requirements were dealt with here, some arriving by sea, some by rail.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: No.9 Dock Crane
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2011, 18:30:06 »
Please remember that cranes age. Even with the best maintenance in the world a crane will be down graded with age and use. Also testing procedures and requirements change so that what was acceptable in 1890 was not acceptable in 1930.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline cliveh

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Re: No.9 Dock Crane
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2011, 14:17:05 »
Hi,

Interesting photos.  The No9 Dock crane pictured is not the one I remember, the one I recall was over the Basin Near No9 Dock, my dad who worked in the Yard for over 40 years has just reminded me that this crane was nicknamed the 120 toner, so it was most likely that the SWL was 120 tons.

The only cranes I recall next to No9 Dock were the much smaller dockside cranes.  I did a stint on crane maintenance as part of my Apprenticeship and had to climb the carane jibs to grease the top pulleys and change the hooks and ponder balls which were sent for testing.



The huge crane in the Nuclear Re-fitting and Re-Fuelling Complex, opposite No.9 Dock, was a 120 tonner I believe and my 1955 plan of the Dockyard shows a gantry crane on No.9 Dock Wharf.

cliveh

Glow in the dark

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No.9 Dock Crane
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2011, 19:29:36 »
Hi,

Interesting photos.  The No9 Dock crane pictured is not the one I remember, the one I recall was over the Basin Near No9 Dock, my dad who worked in the Yard for over 40 years has just reminded me that this crane was nicknamed the 120 toner, so it was most likely that the SWL was 120 tons.

The only cranes I recall next to No9 Dock were the much smaller dockside cranes.  I did a stint on crane maintenance as part of my Apprenticeship and had to climb the carane jibs to grease the top pulleys and change the hooks and ponder balls which were sent for testing.


patmore

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No.9 Dock Crane
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2011, 14:18:10 »
No photo of the nuclear crane but here are the sheerlegs and the huge No. 9 dock crane.

 

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