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Author Topic: British Restaurants in Wartime  (Read 7443 times)

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Offline Lyn L

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Re: British Restaurants in Wartime
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2018, 07:02:31 »
Oh yes ! The dreaded Gaggia. Nuff said  :)
 Perhaps that's why the icing hadn't set on the cake, payback. We did keep the top tier for use as a christening cake and then never did use it. Found it a few years later, the icing solid.

PS.
I have 3 sons and none of them were ever christened. Too many family arguments about christening gown ! They're all HEATHENS !. but all married and have children of their own.
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline smiffy

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Re: British Restaurants in Wartime
« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2018, 01:26:53 »
I'm sure I went in there many times as a child, but I can't remember much about the interior at all.  Some of the trees visible in the picture are actually still there, probably the only things that are.

I seem to recall you talking about your time at Nicholas Kingsman's elsewhere on the forum - something about an incident with a Gaggia? :)

Offline Lyn L

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Re: British Restaurants in Wartime
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2018, 21:35:34 »
Thank you Smiffy.
That's the clearest photo I've seen of the restaurant. Had my wedding reception there, I believe it was the first one they had held there but could be wrong. 1964 and the curtains at the windows are a definite reminder. Have a photo somewhere with them in the background. It's of us hanging on to the wedding cake as it was a 3 tier one and was sinking where the icing hadn't set), our wedding present from Nicholas Kingsmans (the bakers I worked for at the time).
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline smiffy

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Re: British Restaurants in Wartime
« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2018, 20:58:36 »
A bit late, but here's a (not very clear) picture of the "New" Paddock Restaurant. Taken I would think, mid-sixties?




davidt

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Re: British Restaurants in Wartime
« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2011, 17:27:09 »
I've just been looking back at the link Peterchall added to this topic. It's a shame that information about The Paddock Restaurant in Chatham is buried in other topics. I thought it would be worthy of a topic of it's own. My parents used to travel down to Walderslade from Enfield in around 1964-65 to look at progress on the house that was being built for them. They usually went into Chatham and had lunch in The Paddock Restuarant. I was interested to read that it was there until about the mid 70s.

I trawled through the archives at Chatham Reference Library to try to find a photo of it, but I don't think I had any luck. Anyone out there got one they can post on here?

Fred the Needle

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Re: British Restaurants in Wartime
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2011, 15:53:24 »
I remember my mother looking at a cheese sandwich I'd just made myself and saying, "You do realise that's about a week's cheese ration for a family you've got there?"

Goodness knows what she'd have made of the one I made on Monday night then.  It even surprised me... :)

Can anyone locate the one on the Delce Road?  Was it at the top where it becomes St WIlliams Way?  ie at the junction with Cecil Road?  I remember there being some "temporary" buildings there which I thought were the school kitchens, supplying the dinners to the local education establishments

chasg

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Re: British Restaurants in Wartime
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2011, 15:26:24 »
I remember my mother looking at a cheese sandwich I'd just made myself and saying, "You do realise that's about a week's cheese ration for a family you've got there?"

patmore

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Re: British Restaurants in Wartime
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2011, 14:30:55 »
Thanks for the help everyone, it looks like the Paddock Restaurant is the answer to my question and vague childhood memory. It's a shame I missed this thread when it was active, the profound effects of rationing affected home cooking for many years after the war, the attitude of 'waste nothing' firmly ingrained in the minds of my parents generation. I have memories of this way of life, not all unpleasant!
                                                                                      James

Offline peterchall

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Re: British Restaurants in Wartime
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2011, 09:06:53 »
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

seafordpete

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Re: British Restaurants in Wartime
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2011, 08:53:44 »
This has been talked of on here before but way back - might be worth a search

Offline grandarog

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Re: British Restaurants in Wartime
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2011, 08:52:02 »
Heres some Data  :),
                       You can search for more if you have a few hours to spare !

All Saints Parish Church, Chatham.Parochial Church Council
Record that the church hall has been let as a british restaurant, 4 May 1943
Rochester City Council, Date: 1942-1943
british restaurant, Delce Road, Rochester. Plans, sections, elevations (2020) various scales (1381/38/4).
British restaurant at East Row (ministry of Food) site, Rochester; plans, sections, elevtions etc. (2025)

Source :- City Ark.

patmore

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British Restaurants in Wartime
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2011, 05:32:24 »
In WW2 the government, through the ministry of food, introduced a system of restaurants to ease some of the problems caused by rationing. Run by local authorities, there was one to be found in many main towns and Chatham was no exception. Typically, a main meal would cost 9d (about 4p), but where was the British Restaurant in Chatham, I can remember my parents referring to it well after the war, in the 1950s?
                                                                                                               James

 

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