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Author Topic: Naval Estate, Walderslade  (Read 9554 times)

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Offline GP

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2018, 17:23:22 »
Built by Parhams of Gillingham. They had a base near Gillingham Gas works , the site has been developed by them as a gym & luxury flats,

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2018, 13:12:51 »
Lecky... have to agree with you there.
 We lived in a ground floor maisonette when it was RN. They were solidly built . Had friends living above us and didn't hear a thing from them .
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Offline Lecky

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2018, 08:17:10 »
Thank you for the info. My daughter has an ex Naval maisonette and I had a look at the electrical installation. It was superbly installed in metal conduit and a credit to the installer. Also, the general build of it puts modern houses to shame.

Offline Signals99

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2018, 02:57:22 »
Lecky, I am not certain who the main contractor was, but a firm that went by the name of Shave Brothers did a lot of jobbing work at Dargets Wood, paving, concrete paths, etc.
All the street lighting, 440 three phase electricity supply, was done by SEEB Gilingham .The 230v domestic supply installation and connection was Murphys. All were overseen by Ministry of Public Works surveyors - a team of gentlemen who knew a great deal about nothing.?


Offline Lecky

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #12 on: April 04, 2018, 18:17:37 »
Does anybody know which building firm built the Naval Estate ?

tulafalula

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2013, 19:54:20 »
I lived in Duchess of Kent Drive from 1973 for about 18 months. I thought it was all Navy at the time. My quarter was a 2 bedroom flat, one of a block of four. My husband had a motorbike to get to work so I don't know how everyone else managed. I used to shop in Admiral Walk. There was a shop that sold baby clothes I used to use a lot. There was also a mobile grocer which came round once a week I think. I'd buy fruit and veg for a week and still get change for 50p!!
One of the houses at the bottom of the road was used as a baby clinic. There was a plaque on the wall to commemorate the opening by, I think, the Duchess of Kent.  There was also a community centre where I remember going Sunday lunchtime with all the families.

Steve.palmer1@btinternet.

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2013, 21:37:40 »
Browsing web for some family history research and found this discussion which has been very helpful.  Thought it might be worth sharing a bit of my story to bring you a very early segment of the story of Dargets Wood ...

"When he left HMS Centaur mid-1956, Dad came ashore for the next three years, returning to HMS PEMBROKE in Chatham to join the staff in the Commander’s House as the Commander’s Steward.   

Mum moved back down from the Lake District to join Dad – they lived with his mother “Nan Palmer” in Canterbury for the first year of Dad’s time at Pembroke, until the summer of 1957 …

In July 1957, the month before I was born, Mum & Dad were the first tenants to move into in a brand new Married Quarter on a new housing estate just built near Chatham called Dargets Wood.  This was apparently regarded as quite posh back then, and represented a step into the second half of the 20th century in terms of Married Quarters accommodation standards!  It was now a far simpler daily commute for Dad to get to the Commander’s House at HMS Pembroke than it had been when travelling by train from Canterbury every day … their new home was at 14 Fanconi Road, Dargets Wood Estate, Walderslade, Chatham.

However, with the house being a “new build”, much of his spare time at home was spent in getting the garden into a reasonable state – the soil was full of builders’ rubble and was apparently just a sea of mud when they moved in … if anyone is living in that house now – MY DAD LAID THE TURF TO CREATE YOUR LAWN!

We lived here for only two years before the Naval Drafting system intervened and Dad was drafted back to sea.  He joined HMS Victorious in May 1959.  In those days, I’ve been told, it was policy for married couples to be offered a local Married Quarter only when husband was serving ashore, and hence it was time for a family move away from Chatham. 

With Dad at sea, Mum was left behind (with me, aged nearly two!) to undergo the rite-of-passage that is a Married Quarters “out-muster” before she could travel north to resume living with my grandparents in the Lakes.  I still have the form that she had to sign after presenting the house back to the Navy and which shows that it was handed back in a condition which was entirely acceptable to the local Married Quarters Officer – this was completed on 20 May 1959."

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2013, 09:17:15 »
I remember the shop well, we lived in Duchess of Kent Drive just around the corner, it was the only shop on the estate then (1964 onwards). I was expecting our first baby and sent hubby round late one evening as I desperately needed a Sherbet Dab.  :) I had forgotten it was called John's shop though, Thanks for the memory.
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Walderslade_W

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2013, 02:01:30 »
The local shop, up from Dargets Hill, was called Dargets Stores and had a small sweeping drive at the front. As a local in the 70's until it closed down, I think in the late 80's, it was always called 'John's shop' after the local top bloke and his wife who used to run it. He sold almost a bit of everything, and as a kid I used to almost drool at the large selection of toys that hung from the ceiling and the vast shelves of boiled sweets he had at the right side of the shop.

Later on the Naval Estate was serviced by the Admirals Walk shopping strip, which honestly has not changed much since it's construction, even some of the original shops are there (the fish and chips, the hardware store, the grocers, the newsagents) if not in their entirely original layouts.

Offline davidt

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2011, 09:12:35 »
I didn't know about the shop on Dargets Road. I know a lot of small local shops have been lost out here (Rickards at the top of Walderslade Hill, another shop in Chestnut Avenue plus the shops out at Blue Bell Hill village).

Snow always has been a problem out here - too many hills. My mum said that several times coming home from Chatham on a bus in the snow all the passengers had to get off at the bottom of Waterworks Hill and walk up. The bus would then wait for them at the top to continue the journey.

When I worked in Chatham, my work colleagues referred to Walderslade in the winter as 'The Alps'!

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2011, 08:26:21 »
There was just one small shop which was on Dargets Rd, it's now a bungalow . But we had a moblie shop come round a few times a week, he carried everything ! including paraffin and had a 'on tick' book. Walderslade had the cafe but I didn't go to the village much so don't remember it very well at all , the building of new shops and the pub  for Lordswood, started before we moved from there which was 1966 , we got a council flat then as we were local people anyway ( Rochester ) and yes, public transport was good. Except when it snowed and they couldn't get up the hill, then it meant a walk up from Waldersalde village, not easy with baby, pushchair ,shopping etc  :)
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Offline davidt

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2011, 00:10:06 »
Thanks for the information Lyn L. I managed to find it using Google as you suggested. Very interesting. Shame there were no photos to go with the article.

It was the possible lack of cars that made me think it was a bit far out from the dockyard/barracks, but I suppose public transport was probably better then.

I was just thinking, Walderslade must have been a bit of an odd place in the late 50s as to my knowledge it consisted of a few very old houses, the self-builds on the plots of land bought from Mr Brake, the Weeds Wood council estate plus the Army/Naval estate. Quite a mix really!

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2011, 21:42:24 »
davidt...
If you google Naval Review, it should come up? On the top it has Archive, click that and it shows issues by year date. The one I read was Issue 1 1957, it came under Naval Affairs page 62 onwards. You may find it.
I imagine the estate was built that far out just because of sheer numbers of houses needed, it was rather a lot of ratings (560) and purpose built. There were all sorts of ranks there, the  family next door to us, I believe he was a Sgt. in the army, quite a story for them as he left the wife with 5 children, but not to be spoken about on KHF. There were very few cars then so I suppose most men had to bus in, my hubby had a Lambretta so he was OK. I think the bus stop plaque is shown on the Dock Rd. thread about bus signs. I also think that the houses were sold off when the Dockyard closed but I'm really not sure now. I do remember that Kellaway Rd. WAS Army as was the R hand side of Hornbeam Ave. so perhaps the houses further up were where the divide between was ? long time ago now  :)
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Offline davidt

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2011, 20:55:44 »
Thanks Lyn L. I'm assuming from what you've said that it was basically married quarters for navy and army personnel which was originally rented out from the armed services? I wonder why it was built so far away from the barracks and when it was sold off to become private housing.

I was talking to someone a couple of days ago who said how small some of them were and that some people had bought two and knocked them into one. I'm assuming he meant the maisonettes as they look like houses with just another entrance on the first floor.

Two power points in the lounge was definitely the height of luxury. Our house was built in 1966 and originally only had one!

I'd loved to have looked at the review, but unfortunately I can't get the link to work! :(

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Naval Estate, Walderslade
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2011, 20:31:59 »
Dargets Wood was both Navy and Army. We lived in Duchess of Kent Drive but we had an Army house next door to us so I'm not sure where they started and finished now.
According to the Naval Review 1957  there were 280, 3 bed semi's and similar number of flats (maisonettes) for 560 ratings and families spread across 13 roads. Built 1957 the cost of a 3 bed was 17/-  a week and 15/6 for a flat. The Duchess of Kent officially opened the estate on 21st Nov 1957. The review also tells about the furniture that was provided plus 150 items of crockery and cooking utensils (we had everything). The bit that tickled me in the review was " In the fully fitted kitchens are the latest gas cookers. There are ample power points with two in the lounge (wow) and there is also a panel for radio and television connections ". We were well taken care of, everything was there , even a Dr's surgery. We went there in 1964.

If you wanted to see the review it's here.
www.naval-review.org/issues1957-1.pdf

Page 65.
 
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