News:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School  (Read 16862 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Oldbob

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 6
  • Appreciation 0
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #38 on: July 24, 2017, 12:31:56 »
Sorry, the link works a lot better if you use www.abelian.org and then scroll down to the heading: Other things

Offline Oldbob

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 6
  • Appreciation 0
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #37 on: July 24, 2017, 10:57:37 »
A sample from the 1963 Math School panorama is (hopefully) attached. Hours of endless fun are guaranteed in naming the handsome crew.

Offline Oldbob

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 6
  • Appreciation 0
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #36 on: July 24, 2017, 10:38:24 »
Frank and fearless reviews of the virtues and defects of many of the Math School masters from the 1950-1980 period can be found at www.abelian.org/MSR The site contains also a link to the Documentary Photography Archive maintained by Manchester City Council. That archive contains many of the panoramic school photos that were popular during the last century. Several Math School panoramas are available; they may be viewed and/or purchased. Gordon House forever!

Offline Jackie Paper

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Appreciation 1
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #35 on: December 28, 2014, 11:27:21 »
After much fruitless research, a friend's brother, back home for Christmas, immediately identified the mystery teacher as Barry Searle, Geography. So that clears that one up.
   

Offline Jackie Paper

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Appreciation 1
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #34 on: November 19, 2014, 16:19:05 »
Not Hankinson. My scan (actually a phone pic) of the picture makes it look like he's got a 'tache but he was always clean shaven. Used to remind me a bit of Rodney Bewes, but never taught me and I don't remember his subject. 

Offline mad4amanda

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 95
  • Appreciation 8
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #33 on: November 18, 2014, 18:37:21 »
Great find. My era I think. Your ? could be Mr Hankinson possibly ?

Offline Jackie Paper

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Appreciation 1
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #32 on: November 17, 2014, 20:30:25 »
Staff in academic gowns heading for the cathedral on founder's day 1979. Pic is from the school magazine, credited to the Chatham News. The names of a couple escape me for the moment, perhaps someone of the appropriate vintage can help out.

L-R: Mr Goodwin; Mr Mortimer; Mr Smith; Mr Barnett; Mr Farmer; Ma Barker; Mr Thind; Mr Fry; Mr (?); Mr Roberts; Mr Edmondson(?); Mr Hardy; Mr Nutt.   

Offline smiler

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 946
  • Appreciation 68
  • Far better to be screwed up than screwed down
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #31 on: September 14, 2014, 12:08:50 »
Thank you emmjaybee I've been waiting nearly 3 years for that answer   :) :)

Offline emmjaybee

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • Appreciation 0
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #30 on: September 10, 2014, 16:31:24 »
Anybody know what the large building now going up is going to be ? Something special or just a few extra classrooms.

The new block is the technical and art block, incorporating food technology as it's now part of the curriculum.

I was an IT technician there for nearly five years from January 2007 to November 2013

Fred the Needle

  • Guest
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #29 on: April 23, 2012, 13:12:39 »
In my days, 1960 to 65 the part of the car park mentioned above was called the lower yard. It was, as so correctly identified, accessed by coming down the old flint built tunnel which is still visible from Corporation street. The other end of this tunnel was located in the upper yard. In the upper yard there was one of the inevitable portacabin type classrooms with two seperate rooms. One, as I recall was for History and the other for Geography. The Geography room being lauded over by the Rev. Don(?) HAYNES; the history one evades me.
In the lower yard, when you exited the tunnel, on your left was the toilet block or perhaps I should say the boys smoking room. Past the toilet block was an old building with the front at right angles to Corporation street. This contained, on the left closest to the old Roman wall, the biology lab and on the right the art room. The art room was the domain of Mr. MASON although I do seem to recall the Pussy PURLE also had a hand in this. (pleased to be corrected if I'm wrong.)
As you descended the tunnel and reached the lower yard to your right was a low brick wall with railings on top. This seperated the lower yard into two sections and I believe, once again willing to be corrected, that the yard the other side of the railings was for the 6th form as it wrapped around their classroom block. Seem to recollect that this was not particularly busy at break times. The round flint tower was adjacent to the 6th form block  which I believe was called N block.
The lower yard was the football zone and as I recall there was always one massive game going on using a tennis ball, but as I was not interested in football I'm unsure of the protocol involved.
I will end there but my memory still seems to recall a lot about the building. Can't remember yesterday though.
I'd forgotten a lot of this as I was only a "resident" of the "Old" building for 3 years (2nd year and 4/5th years in old money).  I recall the portacabin but your eye for detail Chantalian is much better than mine - flint tunnel eh, can't say I ever noticed it was flint  :)  But I remember the Rev Don Haynes.  Wasn't sure if he was a real rev.  I had him for what used to be called Scripture in one of those portacabin rooms and it was an examinable subject.  Then (and I believe it was in the second year) he came in with the "exciting" news that he had managed to get the school to make the subject non-examinable and it would now be called "Religion and Life discussion".  To me (and I suspect to most schoolchildren) this really meant "relax people it doesn't really matter"  We did get some occasional homework like prepare a talk on some aspect of life - I remember mine with 2 other lads (I think it was Colin Jones and Andrew Laws - Andrew contributed nothing to the talk AT ALL, being one of the "hard nuts") was about racial discrimination in the housing market.  Our talk was abysmal but "Don" seemed ok with it.

Can't seem to recall a Mr Mason teaching Art - can't recall the name of the guy who tried to teach me, think it began with a 'B' but the only name I can recall is "Bentall" and it definitely wasn't him.  He was known as a tough teacher, but I always seemed to get on reasonably well with him - even though I have absolutely no artistic talent whatsoever.  I do however recall having "Pussy" Purle for art one year; think it was in the 4th form for some reason which is odd as I didn't do art for "O" level - perhaps it was in the 3rd year as we used to have to go to the "Old" site for one morning and one afternoon a week if we were based at the "New" school for some unknown reason.  "Pussy" was a much more laid back teacher of art than of PE and his lessons were enjoyable I felt.  The lessons were not in the portacabins however for some reason they were in an upstairs room not equipped for art - odd.  We'd have to go out to a cupboard to get paints etc and it really was only drawing, not the type of art (fabrics, collages etc) that the mysterious 'B' I've mentioned went in for.

Offline CHANTALIAN

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 20
  • Appreciation 2
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #28 on: April 23, 2012, 08:42:15 »
In my days, 1960 to 65 the part of the car park mentioned above was called the lower yard. It was, as so correctly identified, accessed by coming down the old flint built tunnel which is still visible from Corporation street. The other end of this tunnel was located in the upper yard. In the upper yard there was one of the inevitable portacabin type classrooms with two seperate rooms. One, as I recall was for History and the other for Geography. The Geography room being lauded over by the Rev. Don(?) HAYNES; the history one evades me.
In the lower yard, when you exited the tunnel, on your left was the toilet block or perhaps I should say the boys smoking room. Past the toilet block was an old building with the front at right angles to Corporation street. This contained, on the left closest to the old Roman wall, the biology lab and on the right the art room. The art room was the domain of Mr. MASON although I do seem to recall the Pussy PURLE also had a hand in this. (pleased to be corrected if I'm wrong.)
As you descended the tunnel and reached the lower yard to your right was a low brick wall with railings on top. This seperated the lower yard into two sections and I believe, once again willing to be corrected, that the yard the other side of the railings was for the 6th form as it wrapped around their classroom block. Seem to recollect that this was not particularly busy at break times. The round flint tower was adjacent to the 6th form block  which I believe was called N block.
The lower yard was the football zone and as I recall there was always one massive game going on using a tennis ball, but as I was not interested in football I'm unsure of the protocol involved.
I will end there but my memory still seems to recall a lot about the building. Can't remember yesterday though.

Offline peterchall

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3620
  • Appreciation 186
  • 25.06.1929 - 12.03.2016
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #27 on: April 22, 2012, 23:42:02 »


.....how did the part of the City Wall that we see along the Casino car park integrate into the school site?
I don't know why, or remember when, the school building was demolished but I can say that part of the car park in Corporation Street was the school playground. We came out of the rear of the school and went down a slope through a tunnel into the playground. The tunnel is still there next to the round tower - I think the playground then 'wrapped round' the tower, if that makes sense; it was 70 years ago so it is subject to the foibles of my memory. I don't know what is now at the other end of the tunnel.

It might be of interest that I was actually a pupil of the Technical School just next to the Casino, but we went to the Math School for some lessons during the war - probably due to shortage of teachers making sharing necessary. I remember our History lessons were in a room with tiered seating and the teacher was a Mr Locket, about whom there was a ditty that I can remember to this day, but is unrepeatable on a family forum.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Starboyx23

  • Guest
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #26 on: April 22, 2012, 22:43:10 »
Hey guys -
I've read the existing Maths School thread, but does anyone have specific information on the fate of the orginal building on Rochester High Street?

Specifically, I've always wondered why such a magnificent looking building was torn down.... was the building in a poor state? The photos available show it looking very grand - I'm guessing the school relocated in order to gain more space, better facilities and modernise, but was the deal always that the building would be destroyed? Did anything survive?
Was it torn down as soon as the last school business moved out? or was it used for something else beforehand?

Are there any photos showing the demolition?
and finally, how did the part of the City Wall that we see along the Casino car park integrate into the school site?

Any info would be greatly appreciated!
(and apologies if some/all of this has previously been discussed)

Regards

Stroodle

  • Guest
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #25 on: March 14, 2012, 12:55:46 »
Speaking of the "House" system, I was in Pitt and our colour was yellow (throughout my school career, I was always in the team with the yellow colour - odd).  The other houses were Bridge, Castle and Gordon.  I understand there's a few more "Houses" now.

The other houses are River and Thetford. River after the River Medway and Thetford was named after the sister school up there, also founded by Sir Joseph Williamson. Thetford house started in 1996, my year was the first year where there were 6 "full" classes, in the above years they asked for volunteers to join the new house, with the 5 existing houses being split into 6 smaller classes per year. thetford had a pretty poor reputation for the first couple of years due to the students who had defected were generally the more "boisterous" ones (i.e. similar to when all the convicts were taken to australia ;-) ).

Mr Bentall was still there teaching History when I was a student there, think he retired when I was in the sixth form. Another great was Mr Goodwin, who taught philoshophy/R.E, he also retired but subsequently became a lecturer at Canterbury Christchurch teaching college, he taught my fiance when she started a teaching degree. I had heard rumours that he may have passed away recently?

Offline smiler

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 946
  • Appreciation 68
  • Far better to be screwed up than screwed down
Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #24 on: December 20, 2011, 18:14:36 »
Anybody know what the large building now going up is going to be ? Something special or just a few extra classrooms.

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines