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Author Topic: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School  (Read 16863 times)

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Offline sharmuk

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Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2011, 15:46:05 »
adverts for school outfitters Ogdens of Rochester

Clearing out some old papers I've just found the bills from Ogdens from when I was first kitted out. 60.25 was a lot of money in 1973. 0.90 of it went on a cap that I was made to wear on the first day and which stayed on until I was out of sight of home, never to be worn again.
"He's the hairy handed gent who ran amuck in Kent"

grantidge

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Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2011, 17:45:28 »
During my brother's schooldays at the Math, the school staged a production of "Romeo and Julliet".  Oddly, the girls who played the female parts weren't from the Grammar, but another secondary school (Chapter Girls is ringing faint bells).  One of the girls had the lovely name of Rosaria Garofalo.

My brother played Tybalt, and his best friend Tony, who is half French, played Romeo.  Tony had the dark good looks for the part - perhaps from his French mum?  They had to learn to fence, I recall.  During a performance of the big fight scene between Tybalt and Romeo, where Tybalt is killed, Tony caught my brother between two of his ribs with his fencing foil, and the pain made him faint.  Everyone thought he'd acted his death well, and gave him a round of applause!  He had a bruise on his ribs that was the size of a dinner plate.  Tony was very upset, but it didn't spoil their friendship which continues to this day.

Offline sharmuk

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Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2011, 11:24:01 »
"Bogroll" Beattie taught Latin, though when I was there he had limited control over the classes and they tended to be a free-for all.

Found this site of Math School reminiscences http://abelian.org/msr/ which may be of interest.
"He's the hairy handed gent who ran amuck in Kent"

grantidge

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Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2011, 21:36:36 »
My brother and ex husband went there, brother from 1956-62 and my ex from 1961-70; also my ex's best friend Alan, who is also a good friend of mine.

I used to hear about the legendary teachers - Pusser Purle who hated my brother because he liked cross-country, not rugby.  Beaky Bayfield the fearsome chemistry master, Bernie Argent the art master who was rather religious and some poor soul who rejoiced in the name of Bogroll Beattie!

Alan was once caught by Skull (or Oscar as he was then known) playing a jazz version of the school song on the piano in the assembly hall.  I can't remember what punishment he got, but he was a bit too big by then for a beating.

Offline ChrisExiledFromStrood

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Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2011, 18:09:03 »
Purle, that was him.

Just found my Williamsonian magazines, from 1974-80. Full of sports reports (not my thing!) and reports on exam successes, and geography field trips. The odd poem from a pupil, and in the back, adverts for school outfitters Ogdens of Rochester and Laveys of Chatham.
Also, probably amusing to present-day ears, the best House in the school (after all sporting and academic results were in) was known as "Cock House"

Offline sharmuk

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Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2011, 10:19:34 »
and a pipe-smoking PE teacher, whose name escapes me.

A.R. 'Pusser' Purle who also taught woodwork and was big in the Gilbert and Sullivan shows.
"He's the hairy handed gent who ran amuck in Kent"

Offline ChrisExiledFromStrood

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Re: Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2011, 19:42:03 »
I was there in about 72-80, just overlapping with the last of the students who'd been to the "old" school: Braxton and Green were still there, also Browning for French (stern but loosened up with the 6th-formers).
Physics from Thind, who managed to shoot a hole in the door when measuring the speed of an air gun pellet...
and a pipe-smoking PE teacher, whose name escapes me.
Founder's Day was at the end of the summer term, and we'd all troop down from school to a service at Rochester Cathedral.
I've still got the school magazines (can't remember the title) from those years lurking in a cupboard somewhere.

Fred the Needle

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Sir Joseph Williamson's Mathematical School
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2011, 14:02:38 »
I'm stunned that there isn't a thread on here about this place.  There have been some pictures on the site of the "old" building in Rochester High Street next to Free School Lane, but there isn't (as far as I can see) a thread for us old Williamsonians to reminisce.  So I've started one.

I attended from September 1964 until July 1971.  Started at the "new" School in Maidstone Road under the Deputy Headship of Mr Thornhill.  I was in the same class as his nephew - Pitt House.  We used to spend (I think) one half day a week at the "old" building.

I remember Mr Thornhill telling us that he'd been told when the "new" building was commissioned that he'd only be in charge of it for a year or two!  However if my memory is correct, it was 1968 before the whole school was integrated together - in fact it may have been later.

Teachers I remember (and despised) were:-

Mr Lingham (maths, Lennie l'oef because of his shape - he went to school with my Dad too)

Mr Braxton (woodwork)

Mr Browning (?)

Mr Green (french, Nerg to his friends).



Ones to whom I'm eternally greatful include:-

Mr Bentall (history, showed me that it didn't have to be boring)

Mr Jones (maths, came with a reputation amongst us kids but turned out that if you tried he's move heaven and earth for you)

Mr Waddhams (headmaster, known as Skull.  Ruled with an iron fist but was actually a really nice guy.  Met him once later when I was taking my car in to be serviced and had a really good chat)

Mr Gray (physics and chemistry.  I must have driven him insane but I always enjoyed his lessons)


As I said, there are a few pictures on here of the "old" building from the outside.  But does anyone have pictures from the inside of any of the buildings?

 

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