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Author Topic: HMS Gannet  (Read 17342 times)

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Offline CDP

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Re: HMS Gannett (before and after )
« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2011, 18:57:55 »
The last two photos were taken by my American cousin Prof.David Penney in1984 at Farnham



This was taken during the stripping of the Gannett

As it was at the end
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: HMS Gannet
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2011, 21:52:36 »
Hi CDP,

I would suggest that you contact the Dockyard Trust on 01634 823800and explain who it is thats coming and their historical connection with the ship and go from there.

By way of an update, Gannet's new foremast and associated yards and rigging have now been fitted to the ship. The re-caulking of her main deck has been delayed by the weather though it's almost complete and the ship is now as near as dammit waterproof. The parts of the main deck which still need re-caulking are the small section between the main brow and the captains cabin bulkhead on the starboard side and the section around the midships gun, which will need to be moved to make way for the work.

The Driver Boom, gaff and mizzen yards have been removed for maintenance and repair. Don't know when they'll actually be worked on and refitted as yet.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline CDP

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Re: HMS Gannet
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2011, 22:34:07 »
Bilgerat, who is it best to contact ,my American cousin is in England next week  and would like to see over the Gannett as our great great relation ,Henry Timothy Penney  was the Officer in Charge when it was built at Sheerness,He will be bringing some photos for the Trust from his collection ( if he remembers ) of this ship.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: HMS Gannet
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2011, 22:57:56 »
As built, Gannet was armed with five 64lb rifled muzzle loading guns. One was on tracks under the forecastle and could be moved to either of the two bow gunports and trained to fire almost dead ahead. Two more were mounted broadside, just aft of the foremast. One was mounted on the centre line just forward of the main mast and like the forward gun, could be moved on tracks to fire out of either side.  The aft-most gun was mounted behind the main mast and had the same arrangements as the bow gun. She was also fitted with a number of Nordenfeldt Machine Guns. These are 5-barrelled guns which fire all 5 barrels simultaneously. I believe they are 0.44" calibre.

The Poop deck and the two breech-loading guns were built during her major refit which preceded her second commission. The two broadside-mounted 64 pounders were removed to create the spare top-weight capacity for this. After her refit, she was also fitted with a pair of Nordenfeldts each side on the forecastle and also one on each quarter in the captains cabin.

Gannet currently floats in No4 dock and sits about 5 feet higher in the water than she originally did. This is because she is still missing her boiler, the 2 cylinder Compound Steam Engine, plus stores, including a couple of hundred tons of coal and ammunition. She has a very slight list to starboard because of the two poop-mounted guns. One is a real one (the starboard or right hand side one) and the other (on the port or left hand side) is a replica. The bow-mounted 64 pounder is a real one, the midships one is a replica and the after-most gun is missing altogether. She is also missing a few tons of sails and associated running rigging.

Any questions, just ask and I'll do my best to answer them.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline kyn

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Re: HMS Gannet
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2011, 22:53:38 »
Thank you for such a detailed post, I should have taken a photo of the masts when we walked past.

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: HMS Gannet
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2011, 22:30:27 »
Gannet is getting the lions share of the work on the Historic Ships this year. Her new foremast is approaching completion in 3 slip, rot having been found last year under the fighting top on the old one. This necessitated the dismantling of the mast; the topmast, topgallant mast and all the yards having to be removed to make it safe. The foremast itself was removed later and will be replaced later this year.

In the meantime, the decks are being re-caulked, starting with the poop deck which was completed earlier in the summer. The work on the main deck is under way at the moment and is just over halfway to completion. The poop deck was in particularly poor condition, the captains cabin underneath it leaked like a sieve and apart from two very small leaks not related to the re-calking, is totally waterproof. The main deck had a number of leaks, some worse than others. Where it's been re-caulked however, it's now totally waterproof. The plan is to re-caulk the sides of the main deck up to the poop bulkhead, then move to the midships section around the gun (which will need to be temporarily moved - probably to one of the port side gun ports) and the main-mast bitts, skylights and hatches. Once the re-caulking is complete, it should be good for at least ten years if not twenty. Also, some rotten deck planks were removed and replaced.

The forecastle also suffers from a number of leaks, but as far as I'm aware, there is no timetable for that to be re-caulked as yet, but work on that may - weather permitting - start as soon as the main deck is complete.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline kyn

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HMS Gannet
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2011, 13:00:11 »


HMS Gannet was constructed at Sheerness, launched on the 31st August 1878 and commissioned on 17th April 1879 her hull cost £39,581 and her machinery £12,889.  She was a Doterel Class screw sloop built of an iron frame covered by a teak hull.  The original design of these ships were by Chief Constructor, William Henry White, but where later adapted in 1877 by Sir Nathaniel Barnaby. 



These boats were able to travel at around 11 knots with 1,100 horsepower.  The held two 7” muzzle loading rifled guns on pivoting mounts and four 64 pounder guns.  Two of these were on pivoting mounts and two were broadside.  The ship had a crew of 140 men.  This ship was powered by steam and sail and was designed to patrol the World’s oceans protecting British interests and trade.

The space below decks for her boilers and other machinery


HMS Gannet was assigned to the Pacific Ocean in 1883 under Admiral De Horsey and spent a lot of time shadowing the War of the Pacific.  Later that year she returned to Sheerness and underwent a two year refit.  She was then sent to the Mediterranean as an anti-slaver.  On 11 September 1888 she was assigned to relive HMS Dolphin at Suakin in Sudan, which was under siege.  She engaged anti-Anglo-Egyptian forces for nearly a month led by Osman Digna and then was assigned to undertake surveying work throughout the Mediterranean.  This was followed by hydrographic work in the Red sea until her return to Sheerness where she was decommissioned on 16th March 1895.
In December 1895 HMS Gannet was transferred to harbor service in Chatham, she remained here until 1900 and she was placed on a list of non-effective vessels.  That autumn she was leased to the South Eastern & Chatham Railway Company as an accommodation hulk based at Port Victoria Railway Station on the Isle of Grain.
1903 saw her become a training ship on the River Thames, she was to relieve HMS President which was the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve drill ship.  HMS Gannet underwent major alterations to fulfill her new duties and was renamed HMS President.  She was to become the headquarters ship of the London Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve and based at South West India Docks,  In 1909 she was renamed President II until 1911 when she was relieved by HMS Buzzard and she was again added to the non-effective vessels list.
Two years later in 1913 HMS Gannet was loaned to C. B. Fry and was stationed in the River Hamble, she became a dormitory ship for the training ship Mercury, at this time she was still known by the name President.  The school took young boys who had bleak futures due to various circumstances and trained them to join the Royal Navy.  The ship was released from this job in 1968 when the school was closed.











HMS Gannet found herself in the ownership of the Maritime Trust where she could be restored.  In 1987 the Chatham Historic Dockyard chartered HMS Gannet from the Maritime Trust and began a restoration program with the aim to return her to her original appearance.  Her ownership was passed on to the Chatham Historic Dockyard in 1994 and she was listed as part of the National Historic Fleet, Core Collection.  In 2009 HMS Gannet was featured on the news after UK’s Prime Minister, Gordon Brown gave US President Barrack Obama a gift of a pen holder which had been made from wood o the gannet referencing her role as an anti-slavery ship during the Victorian era.

 

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