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Author Topic: Eastchurch Churchwardens accounts 1665 onwards  (Read 9868 times)

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Offline CDP

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Re: Eastchurch Churchwardens accounts 1665 onwards
« Reply #11 on: May 28, 2013, 16:45:45 »
Thanks for your thanks.
They fit in well with your data, S.B.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: Eastchurch Churchwardens accounts 1665 onwards
« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2013, 11:31:05 »
Yes, thankyou for adding these accounts CDP they are an extremely interesting read and record of times passed.

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Eastchurch Churchwardens accounts 1665 onwards
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2013, 18:19:41 »
Many thanks for adding these Churchwarden records CDP, I find them very interesting with the information supplied as well.
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline CDP

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Re: Eastchurch Churchwardens accounts 1665 onwards
« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2013, 17:09:08 »
1815.  Two drowned men.

1816.  One drowned man.

1818.  Nathaniel Taylor, parish clerk for 16 years, gave up at the age of 76 attending at the graveside as his own turn had come to be “ Laid in sleep".

1823 and 1827.  “ A man found drowned ".

1828.   July 27th  Thomas Carpenter, “killed by the going off of a gun".

1832.  (Cholera year) Knight Norfolk, harvest labourer, July 29th this note is appended.”  This person dying of the disease called cholera morbus, was buried in the parish meadow in Eastchurch Street, a portion of which was fenced  off for that purpose as directed by the Lords of the Privy Council "
Under this is a second entry “Charles Russell Yalding harvest labourer.  Buried in the Parish Field. Died of cholera morbus, was buried in the Parish Meadow", Many of us can remember (in 1884)  this “ fenced corner " in the village although the fence has long disappeared.

1834. The village saw the stately funeral of Sir Richard King, K.C.B., Commander-in-Chief at the Nore, who was laid in a vault in the centre of the chancel, and whose monument on the wall close by, records that death has no respect of persons, and that admirals as we0ll as harvest labourers are alike, obliged to go at the call of cholera.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline CDP

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Re: Eastchurch Churchwardens accounts 1665 onwards
« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2013, 12:26:07 »
These record are all from Sheppey Church Magazine 1885 .
Eastchurch Parish Registers

1701  John Ratcliff, yeoman and Mary Sanders, spinster, married Aug 5th with this note, “ Banns published five years since “.
1703  Jan 4th  Joseph Snell, labourer and Cath Stownard married by a twofold license.

1705  John Davis, labourer, became the 6th husband of Elizabeth Smith, aged 81.

1721  John Hardman, bach. of Quinbro’ and Elizabeth Crosier, a widow of Minster, married by “ certifcate of banns published in each parish (not allowed now,in 1884). 
           
1786  Aaron Brown died  ,buried in Minster but noted in Eastchurch  register as  “ He had a good character “.   

1789  Mary Jarrett, aged 50 is called “ a good kind of woman , who was born here and lived all her days “, died suddenly when they were taking her to bed “.

1798  Two men “ supposed to be Russian “,  found on the sea shore, found their last resting place in our yard.


1800  The Rev. David Martin, who had been curate for many years, lost his wife. The stone on which her death is recorded with that of her husband and some of the family, is now placed underneath the Communion Table.

1808  A young man is recorded as having died of a disease for which we fancy that the Registrar-General now provides no column for entry “. James Rowland, aged 27 hurt his constitution by overworking  himself.

In old times, as people whose memory can carry them back beyond 1840, will remember the Schools were held in the church in the past, that now is given up to the school children on Sundays. We can fancy the old lady who presided there when we read in 1810 ” Ann Harris, she had formerly been the village school mistress aged 88".

1811  John Hammond Stiver aged 82, “a Hanoverian “ was buried, probably an old German soldier who came over in the time of King George 111.

1813  William Tippett, labourer. He had worked on one farm for more than 50 years and had obtained the Premium 80 years.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline CDP

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Re: Eastchurch Churchwardens accounts 1665 onwards
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2013, 18:19:56 »
1683  "Dr. John Dade  of St. Margarets, West Minster " was buried, and in the following year " Mrs. Bridget Dade of Borstal in Minster ". This was the good lady who left a charge of twenty shillings (£1) a year on one of her cottages to be divided annually among four poor widows - a gift which is now known amongst us (in1884) as " Madame Dades Charity ".

1688. Two men " John Eves and John Eves ffather and son " were buried together on December 27th while Gregory Bayley's age being unknown, he is called " an ancient man ".

1702  Mr. Robert Eaton, Vicar of Leysdown , was buried, also T. Jordan (a poor Anabaptist), Susan Wide (a poor old maid) and Thomas Stevenson, yeoman, renting about £600 per annum, together with Thomas Stevenson, his nephew, a youth about 14 years of age, died in ye house together, called ye Parsonage House, within three quarters of an hour of each other, Dec. 15th and were buried in the same grave, Dec. 18th.


1756 William Johnson, sexton, being lunatic, hanged himself old Midsummer Day.

1760 Charles Collins, ginger bread maker, and in 1771 "a man from the sea beach, name unknown " the first drowned corpse apparently buried in the yard, hitherto all being interred on the shore where found.

1794  Seems to have been a fatal year for children, six of them having died of the "chin cough".

197  A man who had been buried on ye  beach, supposed to have been killed on board of some of the ships during ye Mutiny at ye Nore .

In 1803  "Thomas Parsons , a lieutenant of His Majesty's Navy" was buried on Jan 1st. He had been drowned " in attempting to get aboard the Hecate gunbrig  on November 9th off Whitstable Bay and left by the tide Dec 9th in this parish". It seems strange that to us now that a body should have been floating about some 7 weeks without it having been found or brought ashore.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: Eastchurch Churchwardens accounts 1665 onwards
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2011, 10:37:58 »
Further Churchwardens accounts..

In 1667 at Eastchurch sixpence was paid for an hour glass. This was placed in the pulpit to remind the Minister of the flight of time. (Supposedly a minister who was very popular on Sheppey had the congregation shout to him on a regular basis 'Turn it again'. I wonder if any congregation on Sheppey would shout that out today.)
In 1672 the Clerk was paid a half years wage for whipping the dogs, Ten Shillings.
In 1676 The Beadle had One shilling for keeping the dogs out of the church.
Most of these dogs would have been sheep dogs belonging to farm hands etc and were either kept out or kept in check whilst inside.
In 1676 Four shillings and sixpence for a carpet for the communion table and Two pounds and fifteen shillings to Stephen Allen for a new chest. Also to Stephen one pound seven shillings for a door for the great Chancel and one shilling eight pence for a lock on it. In 1887 it is stated that the new chest ( which at this time, 1887, was over 200 years old!) is probably the one standing in the belfry in which the old parish books are kept.
In 1678 four shillings for mending the stocks. Six shillings allowed for Ascension Thursday, this day was also appointed for going the bounds of the parish. The Beadle would have soundly whipped a number of boys under his charge at given points on the boundary line. The Six shillings would have probably been for refreshments.
In 1683 Five pounds and ten shillings was paid towards the new dial. This would probably have been over the door of the South porch such as at Minster. (Sun dial)
In 1697 Eight shillings paid for new painting of the dial over the porch.

Offline CDP

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Re: Eastchurch Churchwardens accounts 1665 on
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2011, 18:49:48 »
And in 1879  at Sheppey Workhouse a letter  was read from the engineer  stating he had caught 28 rats in the House  since June and asked for the usual remuneration of 2d per tail

UGH !!
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: Eastchurch Churchwardens accounts 1665 on
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2011, 18:30:36 »
What amazed me about the entries was the fact that Six shillings and sixpence was paid for the fire in London but for killing Hedgehogs and sparrows Seven and sixpence was paid!

Offline CDP

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Re: Eastchurch Churchwardens accounts 1665 on
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2011, 11:28:41 »
also from the Sheerness Times;-

 A Stag  swims across the Swale, lands in Elmley            1877 Dec 22nd
 Rabid dog in church                                                     1871 July 23rd
 Small elephant washed up at Leysdown after gales         1882 Nov 25th
 Order re mad dogs in Sheppey                                      1878 Jan 26th

           

         
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Eastchurch Churchwardens accounts 1665 onwards
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2011, 10:09:20 »
From a chat about the Churchwardens accounts at Eastchurch.. from Sheppey church magazine 1880's.

1665. Six shillings paid for making a ditch around the churchyard.
Bells rehung at a cost of Five pounds and two shillings.
Fifteen shillings and six pence paid for five new Bell ropes.
1667. two shillings and sixpence given to three poor men who had come out of Holland in November 1666 and the same sum given to a gentlewoman and two children.
Six shillings and sixpence given to the Archbishops officer as the relief given by the parishoners of Eastchurch for the fire in London.
Seven shillings and sixpence for killing hedgehogs and sparrows.
1669. Six shillings and eight pence for to joseph ..... killing 25 dozen Warmin( vermin)
1676. John Petman got one shilling for killing ann otter ( Otters in Eastchurch!)
1678. Five shillings paid to lay a bridge at the stile against the Curates door and for boards to make steps for other stiles.
1684 joseph Templeman got Four shillings for rooks heads.
1685. Two shillings and sixpence paid to kill an Otter.
1688. Two shillings paid for ravens and other Warmant ( Vermin?)
1700. Nine shillings for 27 hedgehogs.
1710 A polecats death was more desired than that of a hedgehog though not as important as an otter as ten pence was paid for killing two of them.

Otters, Polecats and Ravens in Eastchurch, how things have changed.

 

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