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Author Topic: 16th century hospital at Key Street, Borden  (Read 6968 times)

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tinkerbell

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Re: 16th century hospital at Key Street, Borden
« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2013, 23:22:43 »
In 1898 Henry Littlehales published a book entitled 'Some Notes on the Road from London to Canterbury in the Middle Ages',
in which he plotted the route he believed Chaucers' Pilgrims to have taken.
For Newington he says; down Keycol, we come to the ' Fourwent Way, 'where meet the roads to Maidstone, to Sheppey, to Sittingbourne and to London. Not far east of this * Fourwent
Way,' on the south side of the road, stood a waybill chapel, erected by the family of Savage, of Bobbin Court. The chapel was within the parish of Borden and was called the Chapel of St. ... at Dental. (Note 2013 Dental name still exists in the now Dental Close).
A modern villa of small size, called Dental House, approximately marks the site of this chapel, which was mainly used by pilgrims. The founder's will provides for services in this chapel during the summer season, but authorises the chaplain to shut it up in winter."
The Pilgrim season, as Chaucer tells us, began in April.

 In Canon Scott-Robertson's Sittingbourne
during the Middle Ages we read :

Mediaeval Sittingbourne consisted of three distinct portions. The chief centre of population was near the church, but there was an important little hamlet called Schamel (often read on later maps as Challwell or Charwell maybe origins of Chalkwell?)
At the western extremity of the parish on London Road. ... As any traveller from London approached Sittingbourne in the middle ages, the first thing to attract his attention was a chapel and hermitage standing on the south side of the road, about three part of the way up that little hill which rises from Water lane-head towards the east: this was Schamel Hermitage and the Chapel of St. Thomas Becket, to which we attached houses for the shelter of pilgrims and traveller a small public house called ' The Volunteers ' (now the Long Hop Pub 2013) now stands upon or close to the site of the ancient chapel and hermitage. Nearly 700 years have elapsed since the first chapel and hermitage were built at Schamel, in the reign of King John. They were then occupied by a priest whose name was Samuel. His duties consist in saying Mass daily in the chapel, and in rcndcrii such accommodation as he could to pilgrims and travellers, by whose alms he supported himself and the chapel. After Samuel's death the building fell in decay, but in the reign of Henry III sufficient alms
were collected to rebuild it on a larger scale. A hermit of St. Augustine's order, whose name was Silvester, became the occupant of the new building. . . . Besides the hermitage itself he had at Schamel four messuages clustered around it, which lodged pilgrims for a night
upon their road to Canterbury."

Subsequently, as the same pages tell us, the Schamel establishment so interfered with the prosperity of the parish church at Sittingbourne, that on the death of Silvester, in about 1271, the establishment was very soon after abolished. In a very few years, however, the whole institution was re-established, and lasted till the period of the Reformation.
.....
So I guess it's under the long hop pub or where dental farm house once stood as the chapel was dedicated to Thomas Becket. I think this was the chapel (cross) that once housed the tomb now in Newington church supposedly dedicated to Robert le Bouser (no one`s ever heard of him) but records show it came from a wayside chapel built by the cross of Thomas a Beckett, in the 12th century. Keycol was in Newington manor and other records state the tomb, alter and bells were carried away ...where to we don't know.

darrenh

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Re: 16th century hospital at Key Street, Borden
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2011, 09:47:52 »
It`s mentioned in Miri Rubins book about medieval charity and community, how they use multiplicity (i.e disguised the building with many uses, charity, education, hospital) to avoid the axe of english reformation (Henry VIII effectively dissolving catholicism, reclaiming all the assets for the state).

jaj

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Re: 16th century hospital at Key Street, Borden
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2011, 00:30:56 »
A little more info taken from the National Archives 'Session at Canterbury, 8th January, 1599/1600  Q/SR/1/m. 3d  1599/1600':

"Evidence is given that the poor people under the keeping of Richard Sherwyn, keeper or governor of the spittle house or hospital at Key Street [in Borden] are visited with sickness. Therefore the yearly pension of £10 allowed to the said Richard at a former sessions at Canterbury, to be increased by five marks for the current year ending Christmas next, to be paid quarterly by the Treasurer of the 'East Partes' of the County."

I understand the spittle house was the residence of the keeper of the hospital (someone else here may be able to enlighten us more on the subject).  In any event, the above helps us fix a date of existence of approximately 1600 and also gives us the name of the keeper.

see: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/a2a/records.aspx?cat=051-qs_7-5&cid=-1#-1


jaj

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Re: 16th century hospital at Key Street, Borden
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2011, 23:32:44 »
If you can get a copy there is an article about The Key Street Hospital and Chapel in:

58 Journal of Kent History 15-16 (2004)

Perhaps try getting a copy from:
http://www.kenthistoryfederation.org/Journal/Back-numbers.html

Offline grandarog

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Re: 16th century hospital at Key Street, Borden
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2011, 19:39:42 »
Hi Ryththa,  :)
              If our members can`t come up with a result for you, you can try contacting the Sittingbourne history Folks.
             http://www.hrgs.co.uk/index.php
                         Good Luck ,Rog

seafordpete

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Re: 16th century hospital at Key Street, Borden
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2011, 18:27:00 »
Some of the Old-Maps show Hunts House as Dental Farm

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: 16th century hospital at Key Street, Borden
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2011, 17:30:08 »
Theres a chapel shown here so it could have been ib the Brick field behind?

I think the brickfield was behind Dental Terrace. The chapel shown on the map was built in 1867.

Offline Paul

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Re: 16th century hospital at Key Street, Borden
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2011, 17:21:52 »
There`s a chapel shown here, so it could have been in the Brickfield behind?

Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: 16th century hospital at Key Street, Borden
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2011, 15:50:12 »
I don`t know if this will be of help. It was written by a lady who is no longer with us and lived in the area. I think that the area you are looking for is possibly behind the row of cottages called `Dental Terrace` which is on the Sittingbourne side of the A249/A2 junction.





ryththa

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16th century hospital at Key Street, Borden
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2011, 14:52:35 »
I am looking for information on the 16th Century hospital that was built at Key Street, Borden (near Sittingbourne). I came accross a reference to this a while ago but it wasnt what i was looking for at the time and so didnt delve any deeper; now of course I cant find it again! I know the hospital existed and wasn't around for very long, about a century I think.

It is possible that a John Swift of Newington purchased the hospital and may have lived their. His will states that he was maintaining the '...chapel beyond his door...', which seems to suggest that one was part of the other; I also understand that the chapel may have been dedicated to St. James. Keycol and Key Street are very different today, most of Key Street being entirely removed for the A249/A2 junction.

anyone out there have any ideas?

 

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