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Author Topic: Dockyard working times 1950s  (Read 5904 times)

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Offline swiftone

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Dockyard working times 1950s
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2012, 14:12:16 »
Some people might find this thread confusing as it switches from 1902 to the 50's and Sheerness to Chatham Dockyard. Maybe the 1902 could be dropped from the thread title.

Offline CDP

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Dockyard working times 1950s
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2012, 13:43:55 »
They would return home for lunch not only to see our beloved but to make a break from the workplace ,who would want to stop in a workplace for an hour  when it was all shut down  I wonder ?
It was cheaper to buy a cycle  from Curry's etc  on H.P. than to pay out for the bus fare every day .
Some of the bosses had car of course.
It was a well known fact that the Dockyard pay was not very good and the work could be fairly slow , but it was  a job for life and in the event of a war ,and the fear was always there ,then these very very skilled men could easily train other  outside workers who would have  been  transferred to the Dockyard.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Far away

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Dockyard working times 1950s
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2012, 12:50:02 »
Why would people return home to lunch? Or have their lunch delivered? Could they not take their own lunch in the morning or was this that traditionally people ate lunch at home?

Oh, and the people most able to own a bike, the bosses, had none at all I suppose.  :)

Offline CDP

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Dockyard working times 1950s
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2012, 11:31:19 »
And ,because of the Dockyard Rush at 12 o'clock with all of the cyclists rushing home to their lunch ,when I was teaching at the Sheerness Tech the lunchtime lessons finished at 5 minutes to 12 so no child would try to cross the road while this traffic was passing !

And , when I worked in the Dockyard there was a very large shed where we all stored our cycles just opposite the Blutown gate and   we  would rush back at lunchtime and literally throw our bikes on the top of the piles of bikes already there and run like mad to get to our work.

And , we always noted that ;- the Electricians lights/dynamo  never worked properly on their cycles,
the Fitters bikes were never oiled and always squeaked ,
the laboures had the dirtiest bikes
and so on !!
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline Leofwine

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Dockyard working times 1950s
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2012, 23:27:37 »
I read somewhere recently that in the late 19th century the Dockyard workers had to work longer hours than the convicts in the nearby Convict Prison who had been sentenced to hard labour!

Also, my father tells me that in the late 1950s & 1960s, whilst he was teaching at Woodlands School in Gillingham, the had to have 2 hour lunch breaks. This was because so many of the families whose children attended the school, worked in the Dockyard and at lunchtime many of the kids had to go home, pick up their father's lunch and deliver it to the Dockyard, before returning to school for the afternoon lessons. It seems Dockyard working times affected more than just those actively employed in the yard.
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