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Author Topic: Germans drop 'poisoned sweets' on Chatham, 1918  (Read 4124 times)

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Germans drop 'poisoned sweets' on Chatham, 1918
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2015, 21:45:31 »
It seems that it was a real fear.

12th September 1917

Children warned against eating sweets found in streets

The Town Clerk of Margate Town Council has asked Head Teachers to caution children against eating sweets found in the streets after air raids.

The Margate Watch Committee is concerned about reports from "across the water" that poisoned sweets have been thrown from enemy aircraft.

In an entry in his school's Log Book, dated 12th September 1917, Edwin Smith, Head Master at New Cross School, Margate, records that, in accordance with instructions from the Town Clerk, he has warned the children at his school that they must not eat sweets picked up in the streets after air raids.


From http://www.tiki-toki.com/timeline/entry/208714/First-World-War-Kent-Medway/#vars!panel=5053561!
Hometown Blues Syd Arthur

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Germans drop 'poisoned sweets' on Chatham, 1918
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2012, 17:40:13 »
From what I can make out from the IWM entry for it, the Hennesey Brandy Tag is actually an advert on the back of a bus ticket. I don't know why a bus ticket was attached though.
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Offline Far away

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Re: Germans drop 'poisoned sweets' on Chatham, 1918
« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2012, 11:22:35 »
Does anyone know why the weight also has a Hennessy Brandy tag attached to it?

Offline peterchall

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Re: Germans drop 'poisoned sweets' on Chatham, 1918
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2012, 14:19:27 »
In all the stories about the use of 'nasty' tactics and weapons, we must always think whether anyone would use them for fear of retaliation.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Germans drop 'poisoned sweets' on Chatham, 1918
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2012, 13:56:33 »
Is the date referring to the date of the supposed event, or is it the date museum's acquisition date for the item I wonder?

Either way, I wouldn't think it likely that even the 'filthy hun' would resort to deliberately poisoning children like this, but I.m ready to be proved wrong.
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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Germans drop 'poisoned sweets' on Chatham, 1918
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2012, 13:28:25 »
A metal weight purportedly dropped with 'poisoned sweets' during an air raid on Chatham, March 1918.
There were no air raids on Chatham in March 1918.

Photo IWM (EPH 5434) Silver-coloured metal weight (L 6.2cm) with hole at one end. London bus ticket number Cc 1102 for Route 43 and a label detailing the provenance of the item that reads "Weight with poisoned Sweets - dropped over Chatham, German air raid March 1918".



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