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Author Topic: GPO van  (Read 15620 times)

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Minsterboy

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #27 on: March 05, 2014, 11:08:45 »
Going back to the very first photo of this thread - going by the type of railings that the van was alongside in the flood water, I would suggest that it was along the Halfway Road, facing towards Sheeness.

Offline JohnWalker

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #26 on: March 05, 2014, 09:15:37 »
Going back the failure of the Morris suspension - this was a fairly common sight in those days.
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Offline conan

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #25 on: February 14, 2014, 19:37:20 »
These vans were fitted with two solid steel shelving sets which with the weight of tools would certainly weigh the back down a fair bit.The photo is of a later van but the shelving was the same for years



maintenance was on a fortnightly basis the vans having a day of the week sticker on them which was either red or blue depending upon the weekly cycle.
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Offline filmer01

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #24 on: February 14, 2014, 17:29:38 »
Looks a bit down at the rear - heavy tool box?

A strange amalgam of bits on these vans, high mounted headlights, but still with the split screen and those unique top mounted wipers - not used on the cars.

Trafficators are fitted proud of the cab, not flush as with the cars, I suppose to clear the van body. Somewhere I have a book about these....

Harking back to the early part of this thread, on the front suspension the lower trunnions that supported the kingpins were like a very course thread that rotated to and fro as the steering was turned. If the grease routine was ignored sometime later the two parts of the thread wore enough to allow them to separate and the front wheel retracted. Mine did it in the dark on a country lane - excellent display of sparks. Wheel wobble under braking was the sure sign - I later found out.
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Offline conan

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #23 on: February 14, 2014, 16:41:35 »
A set of photos that I have just discovered amongst the archive. The way the van is posed, I guess dad had just taken delivery of it. It's parked outside the house in Barton Hill Drive.





To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline TomCat

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #22 on: March 17, 2012, 20:23:27 »
The collapsing wheel syndrome on Morris Minors and 1000's was often caused by a worn or seized Kingpin. For some reason it used to happen mostly just on the exit of a left hand bend. When the Kingpin had seized every turn of the steering wheel caused the locking pin to loosen by a tiny bit until the spindle bolt came loose causing the spindle bolt to slowly work it's way upwards and a few miles or sometimes many miles even a few months later the whole wheel assembly followed it with a sickening crunch and wheel getting lodged under the wheel arch....oops!
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Offline colin haggart

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #21 on: February 16, 2012, 22:12:57 »
I took this photo at the Easter Steam ralley in Chatham Dockyard in 2009.


Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2012, 15:20:51 »
Thanks, peterchall! I knew that you would come to the rescue.

Offline peterchall

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2012, 15:12:23 »
Torsion bars are the 'springs' and work by having one end fixed rigididly to the chassis and the other end forms the 'pivot' for the suspension arm of the wheel, so that the bar is twisted as the wheel rises and falls. Usually about 3 feet long and are in effect a coil spring straightened out.

The stabiliser, or 'anti-roll bar', links the left and right suspensions and is twisted if the suspension on one side falls and that on the other side rises, as when the vehicle rolls, to resist the roll. Listed on-line  is a kit to convert the Morris Minor to coil spring suspension, presumably to overcome the deficiences of the original suspension.
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Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2012, 14:57:52 »
Yes, they did have a torsion bar but I don`t think that is was connected to the front or rear suspension. The rear seemed to be a lever type and similar to the front. The torsion bar seemed to be a vicious contraption bolted to the chassis and the bolts did indeed fail - but I`m no mechanic and I`m sure someone will put me right on this. I always thought that the bar was some sort of stabiliser to stop the rocking and rolling.

Offline JohnWalker

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2012, 14:46:06 »
I seem to remember that the Morris Minor front suspension was based on a torsion bar.  The twisting of the long bar would act as the spring.  I think they either snapped or sheared where they were bolted on. This is all based on a vague memory so I'm prepared to be shot down  :)

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2012, 14:32:43 »
Didn`t the GPO use Morris Minor vans at one time? It was quite a common sight to see a Minor with a front wheel which had `disappeared` under the front wing. I was told that the suspension had collapsed through lack of grease. Another explanation, which came from a GPO employee, was that the lever type hydraulic suspension units, which were attached to the bulkhead, used to loosen and the bolts sheared resulting in the whole lot disappearing under the wing. Seems quite likely to me as the suspension bolts on my Morris 1000 often needed tightening.

Offline peterchall

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2012, 00:11:16 »
They were Morris 8 Series E.

The top opening bonnet meant little space to get at the engine and it was impossible to get at the sides of it from above. To get at the carburetter and manifold, and to remove the valves (it was a side-valve engine), you had to remove the off-side front wheel and remove a plate under the wing. The valve cotters were the tiniest I can remember - easily dropped into the sump when re-fitting because it was a fiddly job and you were working through a hole about a foot square - and kneeling or crouching if you didn't have the car on a lift. If you didn't have spare cotters to replace those you dropped it meant removing the sump to get them back.
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Offline Mike S

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2012, 00:06:04 »
Yes, they did have rubber front wings.

Offline Longpockets

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Re: GPO van
« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2012, 22:55:11 »
Was them the ones with the rubber mud guards/front wings.

I think the GPO Royal Mail Red ones had the same models


 

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