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Author Topic: Hut Barracks, Brompton  (Read 3449 times)

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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Hut Barracks, Brompton
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2012, 17:39:52 »
That does sound like the Merc. The 1841 map I saw them on had some 1851 alterations on it, but the Hut Barracks looked to be partr of the original, not one of the alterations. And even so, 1851 pre-dates the article too.
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merc

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Re: Hut Barracks, Brompton
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2012, 09:56:52 »
Monday, October 7, 1855

It is expected that 300 Royal Sappers and Miners will arrive next week, from Woolwich, to join the head-quarters at Brompton. They will be encamped on the Inner Lines of the fortifications, extending from the Brompton-barrier-gate to the works near to the powder magazine. The huts are in course of erection, and when finished will be capable of affording accommodation for upwards of 500 men.

From The Standard.


I think this could be them, although it doesn't tie in with Leofwine's 1841 sighting though...

merc

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Re: Hut Barracks, Brompton
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2012, 10:45:40 »
I've not sure when the hut barracks were built, but i've seen an account of a couple of huts being added to them, 1850's sometime i think???

They used some of the area behind Prince Henry's Bastion for encampments, when the huts were there, and possibly before as well i think.

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Hut Barracks, Brompton
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2012, 22:50:04 »
Does anyone know when these barracks were first built? It has been suggested to me that they may have been built at about the same time as St. Mary's Casemated barracks, or soon after (c. 1780-1805), but I've found no real evidence to support it yet. The earliest map I have noticed them on so far is from 1841.

I do know they ceased to be used sometime around 1872, and that soon after the R.E. Institute (now home of the R.E. Library) was built on the site (they are listed in the 1871 Census and the R.E Institute was commmenced in 1872/3.)

A contemporary account I have by a soldier stationed in them suggests they were cold, smoky and unpopular!
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Offline kyn

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Hut Barracks, Brompton
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2012, 19:59:39 »
Report of 1858
Hut Barracks, Brompton

There are 24 huts used as barracks for recruits in the vicinity of the Royal Engineer Barracks.  These are situated on a high airy locality, and are well arranged for external ventilation.  Each hut accommodates 22 men, with 360 cubic feet of space per man.
There are two circular ventilators at the sides for admitting air.  This arrangement is not a good one.
All huts should be ventilated at the ridge, either by raising the ridge boards a little, or by inserting short ventilating shafts in the ridge.
Hut Barracks have the great advantage, in a sanitary point of view, of dividing the men into small numbers, an arrangement which enables their health to be more easily preserved than when they are congregated together by hundreds under one roof.  If the huts be constructed of wood, they are very likely to be permeable to air, and ventilation by the ridge will be more easily effected on that account also.
Huts should always be well raised off the ground, so as to have a free circulation of air under the flooring.
There are 2 lavatories of corrugated iron belonging to these huts, with 18 basins each, with water laid on, and lighted with gas.
The accommodation appears to be sufficient.
There are also 2 wash-houses with troughs, boilers, and water laid on.
There are 2 cook-houses of galvanised iron, with boilers and water laid on, and lighted with gas, but there are no means of baking or roasting meat.
There is no covered shed for drilling the recruits in bad weather.
A portion of the drainage of the huts is carried into the main sewer, and the remainder by pipes outside the works.
The latrines of these huts are the most defective part of the arrangements.  Boxes are used, which are moved out, and have their contents carted away at night.  The operation is very offensive, and is complained of both at the Barracks and by the public.
There is no reason why this nuisance should not be removed; the boxes ought to be discontinued, and proper water latrines, with flushing arrangements into pipe drains, submitted.

We would, therefore, recommend:-

1.   That water latrines and drainage be provided.
2.   That the hut ventilation be improved by ridge ventilators.
3.   That a roasting oven be provided for the cook-house.
4.   It would be a great improvement to erect a covered shed for drilling the recruits it would be the means of saving sickness on their entrance into the service.


 

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