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Author Topic: Mote Park Maidstone  (Read 18233 times)

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KeithJG

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #27 on: January 26, 2016, 18:40:39 »
Also an Autocross i went to in 1968 at Mote Park.

Offline CAT

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #26 on: January 24, 2016, 17:40:53 »
Second pic of the railway.

Offline CAT

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #25 on: January 24, 2016, 17:39:20 »
Having worked on the main house and its grounds prior to and during its conversion, I don't remember it much before hand. However, in my collection I do have numerous pics of events happening within the grounds such as the miniature railway, which as one image states the railway and engine was the responsibility of the Maidstone Engineering Society and who clearly say 'anyone riding on the train did so at their own risk and they accepted no responsibility of injury or damage. Couldn't have been to many problems judging by the numbers of children and adults that rode the rails elevated on stacks of concrete block piers, some over six feet high?

Also, it would appear that not just model cars were racing around parts of the grounds as can be seen in the second image. Whether this was a one-off event or a regular club feature I don't know. Either way, it looks as though it still drew the spectators?

Offline 80sChild

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #24 on: December 18, 2015, 14:12:17 »
Next to the minature railway on its west side is a large concrete circle in the grass. In the late fifties and sixties this was one of Englands most popular tracks for racing tether cars (radio control car without the radio control). Cars were raced there until 1970, by which time it had become the only tether car track left in the country.

My father, when he was a young boy, grew up in and around Maidstone and I remember him saying that when he was young he remembers seeing the model cars racing round and round on that circle.

And although I remember seeing the model trains on the tracks (and having a ride on them a few times) I also seem to remember that there was like a bike track almost next to the track with hills and humps that you could ride your bike up and down, but the last time I went there a few years ago I think the council must have filled it in, because I don't think it's there now.

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #23 on: December 15, 2014, 13:38:13 »
Lovely photo's   :)   thanks . Glad you enjoyed your day .
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline Admiral D Ascoyne

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #22 on: December 15, 2014, 13:34:11 »
I had Sunday lunch (£16.95 for 2 course - very nice) on my birthday, photos attached...
Nostalgia's not what it used to be

yaffaw1

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #21 on: August 22, 2014, 08:51:25 »
Mote House is now owned by Audley Retirement Villages. When they purchased the site the mansion was in a dire state, in fact as they started the work on it, it was worse than they first realised. The building had been neglected for years.

The whole site comprises of 100 apartments and houses. Some are within the mansion and some in the old gate house area and the old walled garden. The final phase of construction has just begun to convert more of the out buildings.

The mansion also contains a restaurant, bar and bistro and a health club. Audley's website has photos of the interior.
They have artwork on loan from Maidstone museum hanging in the public spaces.
   

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #20 on: July 09, 2014, 20:41:48 »
Thank you Chatham Boy. I thought it was for tethered aircraft, however the cars sound more fun.

S4.
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Chatham Boy

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #19 on: July 09, 2014, 20:32:02 »
Next to the minature railway on its west side is a large concrete circle in the grass. In the late fifties and sixties this was one of Englands most popular tracks for racing tether cars (radio control car without the radio control). Cars were raced there until 1970, by which time it had become the only tether car track left in the country.

Offline kyn

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2014, 16:18:20 »
A nice old image of the mote.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2013, 23:57:43 »
King George lll visits Maidstone, 1st August 1799.

Our exhausting struggle with France, and the aggressive policy of Bonaparte, gave rise in 1798 to the formation in Kent of volunteer brigades, and elicited from the latter, in the summer of 1799, an imposing demonstration of their loyalty and patriotism. Lord Romney, the Lord-lieutenant of the county, invited them to muster in the Mote Park on the 1st of August-fittingly chosen as the anniversary of the battle of the Nile-to be reviewed by the king and entertained by his lordship.
The volunteers, with colours flying and bands playing, and wearing oak sprays in their hats, marched into Maidstone on the evening of the 31st of July. At five o'clock next morning the infantry began to move into the park, followed some time later by the cavalry; and by nine the whole force was on the ground. It consisted of 5,319 men-4,305 infantry, under the command of the Hon. Lieutenant-General Fox, and 1,014 cavalry, commanded by Lieutenant-General Sir Robert Lawrie, bart. Forty-two Kentish towns and villages contributed the infantry, and the largest single brigade, that belonging to maidstone, numbered 267 men.

The striking scene which the park presented is familiar to us in the large engraving of Alexander's spirited drawing. On the rising part of the lawn at the back of the old Mote house a marquee, festooned and wreathed with flowers and oak boughs, and carpeted with green baize, had been erected for the king and the royal family; and in proximity were several other marquees for the ministers of State and a number of the county nobility. Arranged in two divisions, within sight of the royal tent, were ninety-one tables, which, if placed end to end, would have extended seven miles and a half. Upon these tables cloths were laid, and knives and forks, for nearly six thousand volunteers and other guests. The twenty thousand visitors which the occasion had attracted from all parts of the county, awaited with eagerness the arrival of the royal party. George lll. and Queen Charlotte; Princess Elizabeth and Princess Sophia, their two fair-haired daughters; and Prince William of Gloucester, the king's brother, had left Kew Palace at half-past five in the morning. They breakfasted with Earl Camden at the Wildernesse, near Seal, where they were joined by the Prince of Wales, his brother the Duke of Cumberland, and many of the nobility. After some delay, the journey was resumed, and on approaching Maidstone, about half-past eleven, the king mounted his grey charger, and passing across the bridge and under a triumphal arch of hops and fruit, commenced his progress through the town.

The royal standard floated from the Town Hall and the church tower, and the High Street was crowded by a multitude of people in their gayest dresses. Every window was decorated and filled with faces, and overhead festoons of oak boughs, with fluttering streamers of coloured calico, stretched across from the peaked gables of opposite houses. From every window on Gabriel's Hill hung flags or variegated draperies; handkerchiefs were waved, and huzzas broke at intervals to drown of the horses. On entering Stone Street the royal party passed though another triumphal arch, the loyal tribute of Mr. Flint Stacey. Suspended from the curve of the arch was a large portrait of his majesty, and the whole was surmounted by an immense crown, on which the royal standard was hoisted.

As the park was reached, the roar of guns boomed on the ear, and their majesties were met by the Duke of York; Mr. Pitt, the Prime Minister; Mr. Dundas (afterwards Viscount Melville,) the Secretary of State; Lord Chancellor Loughborough; Mr. Windham, the Secretary for War; and the Earl of Spencer, First Lord of the Admiralty, who had, about an hour before, ridden into the park, each with a spray of oak in his hat. A heavy shower of rain drove the queen and princesses to the shelter of the royal marquee; but the clouds quickly passed away, and the weather remained fine. The volunteers were drawn up in a double line, extending from one end of the park to the other, with the cavalry and a small train of artillery in the background. The different brigades marched past twice, and the review concluded with a sham fight.
Their majesties then repaired to the grand marquee, where they received an address from the Mayor and Corporation, and the honour of knighthood was conferred on Samuel Chambers, the high sheriff of the county. This ceremony over, a sumptuous repast was served out to the royal party; while the ministers of State, with many ladies and county noblemen, were regaled in a separate tent, and the volunteers partook of dinner at the tables in the park. A brief statement of the fare provided for this monster feast will suffice to convey an idea of the splendid hospitality of Lord Romney. The principal dishes were :-60 lambs in quarters, making 240 dishes; 700 fowls, three in a dish; 300 hams, and an equal number of tongues; 220 dishes of boiled beef, 220 dishes of roast beef, 220 meat pies, 220 fruit pies, and 220 joints of roast veal, with seven pipes of wine and sixteen butts of beer.
His majesty's health was proposed by Lord Romney; and several other toasts having been given, the royal party left the ground at six o'clock, returning to Kew the same evening. Before leaving the town the king released the insolvent debtors in the county prison. After dusk, the Town Hall was illuminated. On the following day the fragments of the feast were distributed among six hundred poor people living in Maidstone and the neighbourhood, and in the evening there was a display of fireworks in the Fair Meadow.

In admiration of his benevolence, Lord Romney was presented on the 6th of August with the freedom of the City of Canterbury. At a meeting of volunteer officers at Sittingbourne on the 3rd of September, it was resolved to commemorate the review by the erection of a pavilion in the Mote Park. A circular building, 30ft high, with a dome supported by nine Doric columns, was subsequently raised, bearing the inscription-
"This Pavilion was erected by the Volunteers of Kent, as a tribute of respect to the Earl of Romney, Lord Lieutenant of the County, MDCCCI."


Taken from The History of Maidstone, J. M. Russell. 1881. (Well out of copyright :)) Pages 369-372.
On pages 333-335 there is a history of Mote Park 1267-1800.

Offline mad4amanda

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #16 on: May 03, 2013, 08:22:11 »
Visited Mote park for the first time in probably 10 years yesterday, didn't get to go far as had my baby son with me so we headed for the playground and then had a short walk to the boathouse and back but had to get him back for his lunch.
Congratulations are in order if what I saw is replicated across the park, the town end of the lake was for the very first time ever (I used to go a lot as a child) free from litter and looked wonderful with wide paths that were pushchair friendly, signage was clear even explaining what the old boathouse was built for - I never knew that! The new café looks good and love the way its been camouflaged from the lake, very clever.
My only criticism is that in the play area parents, I assume, had discarded cigarette butts meaning every time I put my crawling baby down on the lovely rubber surface he headed for one and putting him on the grass at the edge was worse with butts and lolly sticks discarded, these facilities are amazing why ruin them?
I will certainly go back with more time to spare and explore some more and take my camera next time too.
But well done to the council and volunteers that have made this happen with lottery funding.

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #15 on: February 27, 2012, 13:13:50 »
Yes, the little train is still there, well during the summer, thank goodness for enthususiasts  :) Also the model boats on the lake, love watching them. Last year there was a very big model which was The Bismarck I think, huge great thing.
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline smiler

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #14 on: February 27, 2012, 12:31:34 »
Was last time I was there about 2years ago, couple of men doing repairs to the line.

Fred the Needle

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Re: Mote Park Maidstone
« Reply #13 on: February 27, 2012, 12:10:36 »
Is the little train still there?

 

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