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Author Topic: Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)  (Read 7694 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)
« Reply #13 on: February 20, 2012, 20:42:41 »
36.   Appointments for limited periods were decided on by the late Lord Herbert in the first instance, not because he considered them the best adapted for fulfilling the objects of the school, for he himself was President of the Royal Commission which recommended that the appointments should be permanent, but because the whole was an experiment, and because he considered that however able a man might have proved himself to be in his profession, his ability as a teacher could only be ascertained on trial.  His object was to be able to drop an able man at the end of five years, if on trial he were found inefficient as a teacher.  As already stated, the Professors of Hygiene and Pathology were, besides their other qualifications, both known to be successful teachers before they were appointed.  Failing this, they would have been subject to the same five years probation as the other two professors.
No doubt the principle is a good one, for nothing can tend more to destroy the usefulness of a school than to saddle it with incapable teachers for life.  It was at one time proposed to make the period of trial two years instead of five, but under the special circumstances of the case, and from the high character of the men selected, a five years tern was decided on.
37.   The question which now presents itself is, whether on the trial the present professors have proved themselves competent for the work? and if so, whether the time has not come for giving them a more permanent interest in the success of the school?  The question is one of great importance both to the school and to the professors individually, especially to the Professors of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, the former of whom was induced to risk his position in India, at the urgent request of the War Office, in order that he would be re-appointed if the school proved sufficiently useful to warrant its continuance, and if he proved himself a competent teacher.
This he has certainly done, and if he is not re-appointed he will be subject to serious loss, and the school will suffer.
38.   As regards the school itself, successful teaching, besides including professional competence, involves a specific talent for teaching, - a mechanism becoming more and more perfected, year after year, by experience, and which every professor has to form for himself.
It successful teaching were nothing more than popular lecturing, many men with fluency of speech and a smattering of knowledge could be found good enough for such work.  But the greater part of the teaching at Fort Pitt is practical handwork, the result of the professor’s own experience in the subjects of his instruction, and also of his acquired habit of observing the mental conditions of his students, and adapting his teaching to these.
To break up an efficient staff of trained professors is hence to incur a double risk of getting worse men to succeed them, and who, whether as good or worse, would have besides to obtain all the experience thrown away by the change.
Such a proceeding would, besides, be in manifest contradiction to the decision of the Royal Commission.  Its tendency would be to introduce uncertainty into the whole school organization, and to lower the whole teaching down to that low level out of which the Royal Commission and the Warrant intended it should be raised.
Such changes have never been adopted in civil life in any country; and at this moment physicians and surgeons of very advanced age will be found in every capital in Europe in the exercise of teaching.
We would observe here, that the highest excellence in teaching is not only aimed at, but is actually attained, in civil life.
39.   Keeping in view these facts, and the great interests at stake, we have no hesitation in expressing our opinion that the present professors have proved themselves fully competent for their work; but we are not unanimous as to whether the present or any future appointment should be made permanent, however competent the professors may be.
Three members of the present committee were members of the Royal Commission on the Sanitary State of the Army, and also members of the Commission appointed by Lord Panmure for organizing the Medical School at Fort Pitt.  They are, therefore, fully conversant with the objects aimed at by both Commissions, and with the intentions of those who recommended and organized the school.
40.   There three members are of opinion that, in so far as concerns the present professors, the intention of both Commissions would be fulfilled by making their appointments permanent, but not by making them terminable; they have a decided opinion on this point.  But as regards future appointments of professors, they would not recommend permanent appointments without trial, which they would propose to limit to two years, after which period, if the professors were found competent for their work, they would propose to render the appointments permanent.
41.   The Director-General entertains different opinion.  He considers that the professorships should, as a general rule, be terminable at the end of five years, for reasons he stated in his paper of dissent appended.
42.   The other members are sorry to differ in opinion with the Director-General on this subject, but they do so in the most decided manner.
They are strongly of opinion that to make the Medical Professorships five years prizes for the Army Medical Department, as the Director-General proposes, would be to set aside the deliberate decision of the Royal Commission.  It would turn the school so far form its legitimate purpose, while it would not fail to diminish its efficiency.  We are all agreed that the professorships should be held by army medical officers, when men of sufficient competence offer themselves, and we trust they will all be so held, when it can be done with advantage of the school.  The school is not with the Army Medical Department, but, as already stated, it has a separate and independent existence under the Secretary of State for war, who is responsible for its efficiency, and in consequence of this, with him rests the responsibility of the appointment of professors.
He may select whom he choses, either in or out of the army, and the only duty of the school is to supply competent officers to the Army Medical School.
43.   The Members of the Committee, with the exception of the Director-General, beg to recommend that the appointments of the present Professors of Medicine and Surgery be made permanent, and that this should be the rule with all future professors who have successfully passed through their period of probation.
44.   There are one or two minor points which require notice specially, as regards the discipline of the school in its new locality.  Being all within the hospital it is desirable that no conflict of jurisdiction should take place between the Professors and the Governor.  We need only allude to this, and point out that the Senate has absolute power over the school arrangements and rules, but this is not inconsistent with the exercise of discipline over disorderly students by the Governor, who, if he were simply informed of the circumstances, would no doubt provide for the exercise of his proper authority without interfering with the Senate or its school arrangements.

James Clark, President,
J. B. Gibson.
J, R. Martin.
John Sutherland.

April 22nd 1863.

Offline kyn

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Re: Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2012, 13:49:53 »
27.   The assistants would constitute the class out of which, in all probability, the future professors of the school would be chosen, for, besides their possession of special knowledge, they would have had experience in teaching, and also an opportunity of showing what were their qualifications for the office.
28.   There is a point of material importance connected with the question of invaliding, which we think necessary to notice.
We believe it has been decided than in future diseased men at home stations are to be invalided at the head quarters of their respective districts, instead of at the general invaliding establishment, as is the case at present, which would appropriately diminish the annual number of pathological examinations.
There examinations are stated to be fewer in number at present than is desirable for the interest of the school , and, of course, if they are to be further reduced, the efficiency of the school instruction in pathology will suffer in a corresponding degree.
In order to meet the conditions of the question as far as practicable, we would propose that all serious cases should be sent to Netley, as they now are to Chatham, and that the other cases should be invalided a the head quarters of districts in the manner proposed.
29.   We next proceed to consider a very important question regarding the efficiency of the school, namely, the periods for which the professors should hold their appointments.
In order to a complete understanding of the question it is necessary to recall the circumstances under which the Army Medical School was established.
30.   Before the Royal Commission on the Sanitary state of the army was called together there was a certain amount of clinical and practical instruction given at Fort Pitt by medical officers in charge to candidate for medical commissions; but it was found on inquiry that the instruction was of an inefficient character, one of the reasons for which stated in the report of the Commission is that there were no permanent professors or instructors at Chatham except the curator of the museum.  The medical officers who gave the instruction were liable to be changed, but practically they remained from three to five years on average, a condition destructive of efficiency.  To remedy this evil the Royal Commission recommended the appointment of three Professors of clinical Medicine, Surgery, and Military Hygiene, to be “permanently attached to the institution,” and that they should be selected, “not for their experience or attainments alone, but for their special aptitude for the peculiar and important duties they will have to perform.”  The teacher of Pathology was subsequently made a professor, so as to raise all instructors to the same rank.  It is clear that the Royal Commission considered the permanency of the professorship as absolutely necessary to any improved system of instruction.
31.   In giving practical effect to these principles, the Warrant of October 17th, 1859, constituting the school, shows that the real object of the school was to supply teaching not to be elsewhere obtained to candidates for medical appointments in Her Majesty’s regiments and in regiments serving in India, British and Native.  Cadets of Engineers for service in India, as well as in other parts of the empire, were also to have the right of attending the courses of instruction of hygiene.  To enable these objects to be carried into effect, the school was placed by the warrant directly under the Secretary of State for War, and not under the Army Medical Department.
32.   It is governed under the Secretary of State for War by a Senate, consisting of the Professors, the principal Medical Officer of the Hospital, the Physician to the Council of India, and the Director-General of the Army Medical Department, who is also President, and its proceedings can be overruled only by the Secretary of State.  Its government is therefore independent of any other department, and it is responsible solely to the Secretary of State.
33.   Great difficulty was experienced in finding suitable professors conversant with the specialities which were to be taught in the school.  It was necessary to find the most competent military surgeon in the army, a man at the same time possessed of the necessary education and teaching qualifications.
It was necessary to obtain a Professor of Clinical Medicine, who, from long residence in tropical climates and extensive medical practice in the army, was competent to teach the specialities of tropical diseases.  Teachers of the comparatively recent subjects of army hygiene and the pathology of army diseases had also to be found; and it was only after a long and careful inquiry that the present professors were appointed in trial.
34.   The Professors of Hygiene and Pathology were nominated for ten years, subject to compensation if they are no re-appointed at the end of the period.  Neither would accept the appointment unless with these conditions, because both had already been known as successful teachers.
35.   The Professors of Military Medicine and Surgery, the former from the Indian Army, the latter from Her Majesty’s service, were appointed for five years, and were both taken fro military duty on account of their presumed special aptitude for their work of teaching.

Offline kyn

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Re: Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)
« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2012, 20:09:09 »
22.   We next proceed to consider one of the most important subjects in our instructions; viz., the state of efficiency of the Medical School.
With the view of obtaining accurate information on the present working of the school regulations, we addressed a serious of questions to the professors, calling for information regarding the manner in which their course of instruction are conducted.  We have received in reply several valuable reports, which clearly show to how large an extent the intentions of the late Lord Herbert in founding the school have been realized; but leading at the same time to the conclusion that the school can be materially increased in efficiency.
It is necessary that we should state at the commencement that the arrangements made for the school at Fort Pitt were avowedly of a temporary and experiment al nature.  The space for teaching was very limited.  The admirable museum most insufficiently accommodated, and all to the arrangements led to this result, that the teaching had to be carried out by relays of students.
Much additional and useless work was thrown on the professors, and the effective working time of the students very considerably reduced below what it ought to be.
In a practical school like that of Fort Pitt, where the length of the course of instruction is necessarily very limited, every hour that can be gained adds to efficiency; but, from the circumstances which we have mentioned, the instruction was necessarily cramped, and could not have been improved except by the removal of the school to a more favourable locality.
23.   The professors all concur in opinion that the practical instruction required of them can be given much more efficiently at Netley than it could have been given at Fort Pitt, and they have laid before us a plan for carrying out the business of the school with the superior facilities and accommodation afforded at Netley.  We do not propose to discuss the details of this plan, for we are perfectly satisfied that the professors will carry them out efficiently.  But to show the great importance of the improvements rendered possible at Netley, we may state that the general result will be that, while the formal lectures will remain as before, the candidates will have four months hospital attendance instead of two, and four months practical instruction under the professors instead of two.  This great gain in efficiency is due to the economy of time which at Netley will be practicable, and also better administrative arrangements, and to certain additional assistance which the professors could propose should be granted.
The instruction of improved arrangements as to invaliding at Netley will, it is anticipated, liberate the professors from much of the routine duty as present discharged by them at Chatham; but it will be desirable that in future they should not be required to preside over Boards, unless they consider that in doing so they will be better able to instruct their students.
They are desirous of retaining the right, but not of being expected to perform this duty.
The appointment of a registrar for Netley will materially diminish the registration duties, which the professors and their staff surgeons have hitherto performed.
Until the exact amount of relief so afforded is ascertained by trial, we would propose that the professors of military medicine and surgery should each have a staff surgeon to assist them on the discharge of their duties, but that if this amount off assistance is found to be insufficient, that an additional staff surgeon should be granted to each professor.
We concur in these proposals, and we believe that if carried out they would for the first time place the clinical teaching on a proper basis.
24.   Besides the advantages immediately accruing to the school from the appointment of these assistants, it would be a great gain to the service to have a certain number of staff surgeons well trained in general hospital work, and ready to take charge of general hospitals whenever they might be required.
25.   The professors of Hygiene and Pathology also require each an assistant, whom they propose to take from among the most competent assistant surgeons who have been trained under their respective courses of instruction.  They propose that assistants so selected should serve for three to five years.
We also concur in this proposal, and we believe it can be carried into effect most advantageously by selecting from among assistant surgeons trained at the school two who have been already engaged in regimental duty.
26.   By this proposed appointment of assistants to the Professors of Hygiene and Pathology, a number of young men would be passed into the army having special knowledge on questions of hygiene and pathology, and who would be at the disposal of the Director-General for any special service the might be required to undertake.

Offline kyn

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Re: Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2012, 19:54:01 »
21.   In paragraph 6 we have shown that the removal of the school to Netley will render other arrangements necessary for giving effect to that portion of the Warrant referring to the instruction of cadets and officers of the Royal Engineers.  We have accordingly made inquiry as to the ebst method of supplying this instruction, and beg to advise that the following course be taken.
The instruction referred to naturally divides itself into two parts.  One of these would deal with the general physiological principles forming the basis of hygiene, and with the physical laws on the observance and adaption of which the healthiness of all buildings intended for human habitation depends.
We find that Dr. Parkes could deliver the necessary lectures on this portion of the subject without interfering with his proper duties at Netley, and that probably six lectures would suffice for the purpose.
The second portion of the instruction would have special reference to the application of the principles discussed in these preliminary lectures to plans and buildings.
It would include the drainage and water supply of camps, barracks, and hospitals, together with the general practical principles of sanitary construction applicable to different climates.
These are specialities which have hitherto received a very inadequate amount of attention from engineers and architects, and they can be successfully taught only by some one who has had sufficient practical experience in sanitary works.
No more competent lecturer on the subject could be found than Mr. Rawlinson, C.E., the present head of the Local Government Act Office, who has been engaged for many years in superintending such works and who has also had some experience in the field, having been sent out to the Crimea by Her Majesty’s Government on the Sanitary Commission.
We believe Mr. Rawlinson would undertake these lectures if asked to do so, and that it would afford him much pleasure to assist in this way in introducing those principles of sanitary construction into the army which he has been so long engaged in carrying out among the civil population.
We recommend, therefore, that Dr. Parkes and Mr. Rawlinson be requested to undertake this very important duty, and conjointly to draw up a syllabus of lectures.  Each course should be followed by an examination.


Offline kyn

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Re: Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2012, 17:43:15 »
18.   The removal of the Medical School to Netley, and the reapropriation of the buildings which this step has rendered necessary, will require the quarters for sick officers, originally provided in accordance with instruction from the Minister at War, to be given up.
19.   The question of additional quarters for these various classes of officers is beyond the sphere of our duty, but we have been obliged to touch upon it on account of its intimate relation with the Medical school.  We would therefore recommend that the amount and class of accommodation required for these purposes be settled in conference with the Director-General.
20.   In so far as regards the accommodation for female nurses proposed to be set apart on the first floor of the administrative block, we would strongly advise that the proposed arrangements should be submitted to the Superintendent of Nurses at Woolwich.
We beg to sum up our conclusions as follows:-
1.   That the proposed removal of the Invalid Depot from Chatham to Netley necessitates the removal of the Medical School to Netley.
2.   That the removal of the school to Netley will prevent one very important object of the school from being realized, namely, the instruction of officers and cadets of Engineers in the principles of sanitary works, and that it will be necessary to provide this instruction separately at Chatham.
3.   That the accommodation required for the school can be obtained at Netley by a few alterations in minor parts of the buildings.
4.   That there appears to be no accommodation for the professors nearer than Southampton, and that until such accommodation is available arrangements be made for conveying the professors to and from the hospital.
5.   That sleeping accommodation for the candidates can be obtained partly in the block of medical officers’ quarters, but chiefly in the upper floors of the administrative part of the hospital.  But the mess accommodation will have to be enlarged and extended to the amount specified.
6.   That only unmarried serjeants be permitted to reside within the hospital buildings, and such number of unmarried orderlies at 600 cubic feet per man as the spare room will accommodate.
7.   That the head quarters of the Army Hospital corps be removed from Chatham to Netley, and placed under the Governor, and that the recommendations of the Committee on the reorganization of the Army Hospital corps for training regimental serjeants and orderlies be carried out at Netley.
8.   That a barrack for all married non-commissioned officers and orderlies, and for such number of unmarried men at 600 cubic feet per man as cannot be placed in the hospital buildings, be constructed in a convenient position.
9.   That the question of the additional quarters needed after the requirements of the Medical School are met be settled in conference with the Director-General, and that the proposals for accommodating the female nursing establishment be submitted to the Superintendent of Nurses at Woolwich.
We have confined our attention simply to the requirements of the Medical School in its relation to the army, but we are strongly of opinion that on being permanently placed at Netley, the school should be rendered available to candidates for admission to the Naval Medical Service also.  If the concurrence of the Admiralty were obtained to such a proposal, some additional accommodation would be necessary as regards quarters.  But for other purposes, the arrangements we have proposed would in all probability be found sufficient.

Offline kyn

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Re: Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2012, 18:55:22 »
15.   In order to carry out the training of orderlies efficiently, it would be necessary to remove the head quarters of the corps from Chatham to Netley, and to place them under the Governor of the Hospital.
16.   It is probable that one non-commissioned officer or orderly may be sent from each regiment at a time for training, at least from home stations, and the orderlies accommodation required will hence be for:-
The head quarters of the Medical Staff corps;
Serjeants-Major;
Serjeants, and
Orderlies of the corps employed at the hospital;
Non-commissioned officers and orderlies sent for instruction from regiments.
Many of this latter class might possible be available for the regular attendance of the hospital.
17.   A number of the best non-commissioned officers and privates of the Army Hospital corps are married, and ought to have separate quarters.  But no married people should be permitted to reside either in the hospital or in the administrative part of the building.
Whatever accommodation may be found available in the hospital, in the administrative block, or in the outbuildings after the school is sufficiently accommodated, should be set aside for unmarried serjeants or orderlies, and for the latter 600 cubic feet per man should be allowed. 
Perhaps the best way for providing for such serjeants and orderlies, whether married or not, as cannot be placed in the hospital buildings alluded to, would be to erect a barrack of married and single quarters.

seaJane

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Re: Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2012, 22:00:57 »
Here's Netley: http://www.qaranc.co.uk/netleyhospital.php

You will see from the link that the Medical School moved from Netley to London in 1902, establishing itself at Millbank in 1907. The page also includes a timeline of Netley with photographs.

Offline kyn

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Re: Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2012, 20:05:04 »
14.   When the Army Medical School is established, Netley will necessarily become a place for the training of regimental orderlies, in accordance with the recommendations of the Committee appointed to examine into the organization of the Army Hospital Corps.
We consider the recommendations of this Committee so important, that we recommend theit being kept in view in providing quarters for non-commissioned officers and men of the corps, and we beg to introduce them here, and to express our entire concurrence in them.
The Committee recommended:-
“That as soon as the establishment of general hospitals under the new regulations is completed, every hospital attendant be sent to a general hospital for a course of instruction and training in hospital; duties, so as to ensure a uniformity of system throughout the service; that this instruction take place under the superintendence of a medical officer especially appointed by the principal medical officer of the hospital for that purpose, and for such a period and in such a manner as the Director-General may from time to time determine.
“That all hospital attendants in the medical branch shall be instructed and undergo a course of training in the following subjects:-
“A general knowledge of the human body; including the names, positions, &c. of the principal arteries, and the mode of arresting haemorrhage from them;
“The modes of carrying wounded off the field, especially with reference to the nature and position of the wound;
“Of applying formentations, poultices, mustard plasters, blisters, leeches, injections, liniments, &c.
“Of making and applying bandages, minor dressings, trusses, and lining splints;
“Of the management of helpless patients with reference to moving, changing, cleanliness, feeding, and administration of medicines; “The names, uses, and appearances of the surgical instruments and appliances in general use;
“The mode of resuscitating a person rescued from drowning;
“Of the use of the stomach pump, and the enema apparatus;
“The uses of splints and apparatus for fractures and dislocations;
“The modes of polishing ward floors;
“The use of the thermometer;
“Ventilation of wards;
“Observation of the sick, as regards:-
   “Secretions.         Intelligence.
   “Expectoration.      Breathing.
   “Pulse.                   Sleep.
   “Skin.                  State of wounds.
   “Appetite.          Eruptions.
“The use of ambulances (when practicable) and of the medical field equipments which may be issued to regiments.
“Every hospital orderly should be instructed to turn in the cooking of diets for the sick, preparing drinks, &c. by the hospital corps cook attached to the hospital.”


Offline kyn

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Re: Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2012, 18:02:43 »
11.   But besides this class of accommodation provision has to be made for professors and candidates.
There are four professors, for whom there are no quarters within the hospital precincts, and, so far as we could perceive, there are no suitable dwelling-houses nearer than Southampton or its immediate vicinity, about four miles away.  Two of the professors would be deputy inspectors-general of divisions of the hospital, and as such responsibility for the sick of their divisions, whom they would have to visit daily by regulation, and at such other times as they might be called upon.
It would be very difficult for them to fulfil heir very onerous duty, besides giving several hours a day to teaching, if they lived at so long a distance from the hospital; and we are of opinion that it would be advisable to build suitable houses for them, unless houses were built by private builders sufficiently near the hospital.
The other two professors need not live so close at hand; but for them also Southampton would be an inconvenient place of residence, and they would have to submit to the inconvenience until houses were built nearer to Netley.
At present, indeed, and for some time to come, all the professors would probably have to live away from the sphere of their duties, and they would have to be conveyed to and from the hospital every day.
12.   About 85 candidates will probably pass through the school every year, including those required for India, and as there are two sessions a year, the probable number for whom quarters would have to be found is 42.
There is a detached block of medical officers’ quarters within the hospital precincts.  In the absence of the Medical school there quarters would be nearly all occupied by surgeons or assistant-surgeons of the head quarters of the Medical Staff (which must follow the Invalid Depot to Netley), including those doing duty in the hospital.
Any of the quarters not wanted by these officers would accommodate a certain number of the candidates in single rooms.
The remainder would have to be placed in the administrative block on the top floor, and in such part of the floor immediately below as might be found necessary.  One room for each candidate would be required, and there should be accommodation for servants in charge of the rooms.
Any non-commissioned officers and orderlies displaced by this arrangement would require other quarters elsewhere.
13.   The library would form a convenient rendezvous for the candidates, and their mess-room would have to be placed at the block of the medical officers’ quarters already mentioned.  There is an excellent mess-room there at present, which although sufficient for the medical officers, would be much too small for the candidates (who must mess with the medical officers) and for other officers who would mess with them.  The total number for whom messing accommodation would have to be provided, including the head quarters of the medical staff and occasional visitors, would be about 100 seats.
We are not aware whether space could be obtained by enlarging the present dining room.  Either this should be done, or a new mess-room should be built.


Offline kyn

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Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2012, 18:53:09 »
8.   Having arrived at the conclusion that the school must follow the invalids to Netley we proceed to examine the hospital in company with the professors, for the purpose of ascertaining the kind of accommodation the buildings would afford.  The hospital consists of two long wings, between which there is a large central block intended for administrative purposes; for the accommodation of certain classes of officers and attendants, including female nurses, and there were some rooms in which sick officers were to be received, if they desired such accommodation.  Behind each wing there is a square of low buildings intended for wards, orderlies’ rooms, lavatories, and similar purposes.  After examining the rooms we requested the professors to draw up a statement of the amount and class of accommodation necessary for the school, and also to prepare plans showing the alterations and fittings required to render the rooms suitable for these objects.
The plans and reports we beg to transmit herewith.  We desire to express our concurrence in the recommendations they contain, and to advise that the alterations be made at once and without loss of time, as it is in the highest degree important that the whole should be completed and ready for occupation by the 1st March 1863, to enable the next session of the school to be opened at Netley on the 1st April.
9.   The alterations and appropriations may be stated generally as follows.
In the outbuildings behind the south-east wing of the hospital we propose to place:-
A post-mortem room, with a room for operations on the dead body.
A chemical laboratory.
A microscopic room.
A workshop.
Store rooms.
Professors’ working rooms.
Quarters for two serjeants-in-charge.
The remainder of the accommodation we propose to place in the central administrative block, and it will occupy the north-west side of the building on the second floor.  This floor was originally intended for female nurses, and it will be necessary to move their quarters and place them on another floor.
By throwing down a few thin partitions, and opening a door or two, space will be found on the present nurses’ floor for:-
The Museum, Medical Department Library, Candidates’ Library, and for the Professors’ room, together with quarters for an Assistant.
10.   Opening out of this floor and on the same level is the corridor connecting the administrative block with the north-west wing of the hospital, at the end of which nearest the proposed library and museum, and close to them, is the present operating theatre, which has been formed by subdividing a large apartment into several smaller ones by temporary partitions.  The theatre is, of course, too small for the purposes of the school, but by removing the partitions and putting in the requisite seating and fittings a room amply sufficient and convenient both for surgical operations and for lectures could be easily obtained.  A small room close at hand to be used as an opthalnoscopic room completes the accommodation.
So far, then, the school can find a suitable home at Netley, at the cost of removing a few partitions, opening a few doors, and moving the nurses’ quarters to another floor.

Offline kyn

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Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2012, 12:48:37 »
3.   The school must hence be placed at Netley Hospital, to fulfil its primary object of affording practical instruction to candidates for admission to the Army Medical Service; but, in doing so, it will be necessary to sacrifice certain other objects contemplated in its establishment, or at all events to provide for there in some other way.
4.   When the school was organised at Fort Pitt it was intended by the Warrant to afford instruction not only to medical officers, but to cadets and officers of the royal Engineers, for service at home, in the colonies, and in India, in the scientific principals of military hygiene, which they would be called upon in after life to apply in the laying out of camps, the construction of barracks and hospitals, drainage, water supply, and other sanitary works.  This instruction of Royal Engineers has since been made matter of special recommendation in the report of a Committee appointed to consider the organization of the Works Department of the War Office; it is an object of the highest importance to the public service, but it would be impossible to carry it out at Netley, on account of its distance from the educational establishments of the Royal Engineers at Brompton and Woolwich.
5.   Impressed with the importance of this part of the subject, we considered whether all the objects might not be best answered by placing the school at Woolwich, where the splendid new hospital, the proximity of the Royal Military Academy, the accessible distance from Chatham and from the metropolis with its hospitals and museums, appeared to afford by far the largest number of advantages; but we were met by the difficulty that there was too small a number of invalids at Woolwich to afford the requisite means of instruction, a difficulty which could only be overcome by landing the severer cases of disease on the Thames instead of at Netley, and we were obliged with regret to abandon this idea.
6.   We are of opinion that it will be necessary therefore to divide the instruction given at the school from that given to the royal Engineers, and to make arrangements, which we believe there will be no difficulty in doing, for training engineers in sanitary principles at Brompton.
7.   It was further intended that army medical officers, as well as combatant officers, should have the privilege of attending such part of the school lectures as they might desire to profit by.  We believe that there would be no difficulty as regards army medical officers availing themselves of the privilege at Netley, provided they could find suitable accommodation.  About 20 medical officers would probably attend each session, but there is at present no place nearer than Southampton where they could obtain lodging.  There would be little chance of other officers attending, on account of distance.

Offline kyn

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Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2012, 18:45:33 »
REPORT OF A COMMITTEE
Appointed by
THE RIGHT HON. THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR WAR
To Inquire and Report on
THE REMOVAL OF THE ARMY MEDICAL SCHOOL FROM CHATHAM, AND ITS FUTURE POSITION AND ARRANGEMENTS.

Members.
Sir James Clark, Bart., President.
The Director-General, Army Medical Department.
Sir Ranald Martin, C.B., Physician to the council of India.
Dr. Sutherland.

Sir,
In conformity with your instructions directing us to report on the arrangements required for the removal of the Army Medical School from Fort Pitt, and the most appropriate locality in which to place it, we have the hour to state as follows:-
1.   We are informed by our instruction that the Invaliding Establishment is to be removed from Chatham to Netley Hospital; and the first question we have had to decide is the effect which this change will have on the school.  If the school must be attached of necessity to an invalid hospital, the mere fact of the removal of the invalids to Netley decides the position of the school; if, however, there is no necessary relation between the two establishments, there will be a certain choice of locality.
2.   We have discussed this point fully with the professors, and they have expressed opinions in which we entirely concur, as follows:-
An ordinary military hospital at a home station contains only that class of cases with which candidates at the Army Medical School are already familiar, and none of those special cases of disease, the result of military service in carious climates, which it is in the highest degree important they should become practically acquainted with.  Besides, an ordinary military hospital affords very inadequate opportunities of pathological research, and of becoming familiarized with the usual operations in military surgery of every day occurrence in time of war.  Sufficient experience in these departments of knowledge can only be obtained in connexion with a large invalid hospital, and the conclusion we have arrived at is, that wherever the invalids of the British army are placed, there the Army Medical School must be also.


Offline kyn

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Report on the Army Medical School (Fort Pitt)
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2012, 19:29:05 »
Instructions to the Committee on the Army Medical School.

Sir James Clark.
Dr. Gibson.
Sir Ranald Martin.
Dr. Sutherland.

You will examine and report on the arrangements required for the permanent position and efficiency of the Army Medical School, at present temporarily placed at Fort Pitt; bearing in mind the objects of the school, which are laid down in the Warrant of the 17th of October 1859, and amended in March 1860.

You will also bear in mind that the Invaliding Establishment is to be removed from Chatham to Netley; and, in the event of your considering that the school should be placed at Netley, you will report in what way it may be accommodated, so as not to interfere with the due administration of the hospital.

War Office, 17th November 1862.


Report to be added later.

 

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