News: The modern name of Kent is derived from the Brythonic word kantos meaning "rim" or "border", or possibly from a homonymous word kanto "horn, hook"
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Hythe Hospital  (Read 1909 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7431
  • Appreciation 409
    • Sheppey History
Hythe Hospital
« Reply #1 on: February 29, 2012, 13:05:13 »
Report of 1858

Hythe Hospital.

This building is situated close to the Barracks.  It contains four wards, with regulation accommodation for thirty-six beds.
There are two wards, number 1 and 4, each having twelve beds; and two wards, 2 and 3, with six beds each.  In the two larger wards the cubic space per bed is 634 feet, while in the two smaller wars it is 585 cubic feet per bed.
The average cubic space per bed is therefore less than one-half of what we are required to set apart by our instructions.
The wards are ventilated by hollow beams, in the same manner as the barrack rooms, and recently the windows have been hung to draw down at top.
There are two water-closets within the building, to which the water is supplied by taps.  The arrangement is not a good one, and soil-pans of improved construction would be better.
There is a privy in the hospital yard, periodically flushed, but it is offensive, and requires improvement.  The urinal is under the same roof as this privy, and is not supplied with water.
There is no ablution or bath room belonging to the Hospital.
The kitchen is not well supplied with the means of cooking.  The grate is insufficient.
The only entrance to the building is by a narrow doorway through the surgery at the end of the building.  The proper door of the building has been closed up, and might be re-opened with advantage, provided an outside porch were added to it.
The following are the requirements for health.

1.   Additional ventilation of the wards by shafts from the ceilings to the roof, and inlets for air.  Front door to be reopened.
2.   Reduction of number of beds to half their present number.  This could easily be done.  The average force at the Barracks is 233, which ought never to yield sick enough to occupy thirty-six beds at one time.
A safe rule would be to distribute the current sick as equally over the space as possible, and if this were done, and the extra beds removed, it is very probable that each patient would have about 1,200 cubic feet of space.
3.   Kitchen range to be improved or replaced by a better one.
4.   Water-closets to be improved.  Urinal and privy in the yard to have a better water supply and more frequent flushing.
5.   Lavatory and bath room with fixed bath, ad hot and cold water to be provided.
   

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines