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Author Topic: Volunteer Artillery Depot & Artillery Barracks, Garden Street, Brompton  (Read 12212 times)

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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Volunteer Artillery Depot & Artillery Barracks, Garden Street, Brompton
« Reply #21 on: February 29, 2012, 15:19:25 »
Plan of the Gunners' Barracks from 1869
Plan reproduced by permission of the Royal Engineers Museum www.re-museum.co.uk
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Volunteer Artillery Depot & Artillery Barracks, Garden Street, Brompton
« Reply #20 on: February 22, 2012, 22:58:59 »
Thanks for that info bromptonboy. It seems the land the Gunners Barracks were built on and that south of Garden Street up to the site of the Garrison Church was purchased by the Government in about 1782, so I suspect those two pieces of information date the building of the gunners barracks quite accurately to 1782/3! (This date would certainly seem to tie in with the map evidence, though it makes me wonder what the building shown on the site in the 1756 map was?)

Now to figure out when they stopped being used as barracks, and when the two northern wings were added to them.
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Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Volunteer Artillery Depot & Artillery Barracks, Garden Street, Brompton
« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2012, 13:44:12 »
Re: Date of the Gunners Barracks. In a letter written by Colonel Debbieg to the Lt Gen of the Ordnance dated 20 Nov 1783, the following is stated:
'The buildings erected by the Ordnance in the centre of the Lines, consisting of sixteen rooms with other conveniences and called the Gunners Barracks, I lately found partly inhabited by people not Gunners, and otherwise extremely troublesome and riotous and abusive to the Warders appointed to watch the works and materials. Upon enquiry I discovered that the Master and four Quarter Gunners have been for some time past lodged, not in their Barracks where they should be, and that the Barracks have been let to Townspeople and others. I have therefore ordered the Gunners to take possession of the Barracks allotted to them.'

It seems fairly certain that this is the Gunners Barracks in Garden Street, and would suggest that in 1783 they were a fairly recent construction. What capitalist zeal the Gunners had, to rent out their barracks, while living elsewhere!

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Volunteer Artillery Depot & Artillery Barracks, Garden Street, Brompton
« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2012, 18:11:16 »
As well as being a notable Butcher and NCO in the Volunteer Artillery, Jesse Catt had also been High Constable of Gillingham in 1846/7.  The Catts were an important family in both Old and New Brompton, and to some extent in Gillingham from what I can make out.
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Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Volunteer Artillery Depot & Artillery Barracks, Garden Street, Brompton
« Reply #17 on: February 11, 2012, 10:53:42 »
It would appear there were a lot of Catts in Brompton! Jesse Catt was born in 1786 and was a Master Butcher living in Wood Street Brompton where he brought up a large family. They were a very interesting family of whom I shall post more in Personalities.

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Volunteer Artillery Depot & Artillery Barracks, Garden Street, Brompton
« Reply #16 on: February 11, 2012, 00:14:19 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 19 February 1861

GILLINGHAM.
FUNERAL OF A VOLUNTEER.—The funeral of Sergeant Major Catt, of the Gillingham Volunteer Artillery Corps, took place yesterday (Monday) week, and was conducted with full military honours. The funeral procession started from the residence of the deceased shortly after eleven o'clock, a firing party, consisting of twenty volunteers of the Gillingham Artillery, marching in front, with their arms reversed. The band of the Royal Engineers preceded the hearse containing the body, the instruments being hung in crape, and the band playing the "Dead March" in Saul. Two mourning coaches and a private carriage, containing the relatives and friends of the deceased, followed the hearse, after which followed a number of the friends of the deceased, and the members of the Gillingham Artillery and the Chatham Rifle Corps. About fifty non-commissioned officers of the various corps in the garrison also walked in the procession, which was brought up by the officers of the Gillingham and Sheerness Artillery. Nearly every shop was partially closed in High-street, Brompton, through which the procession passed. The remains of the deceased were interred Thurnham, near Maidstone. After the procession had proceeded some distance out of the town, the band, the non-commissioned officers, and volunteers, with the exception of the Gillingham Artillery, returned to Brompton. The firing party and the remainder of the Artillery Volunteers proceeded to Thurnham. The service was impressively performed by the Rev. E. K. Burvey. The officers present were Capt. Beveridge, Lieuts. Arnold and Winch, Quartermaster Beard, Paymaster Attwood, and Lieut. Ward (Sheerness Artillery).


Sergeant-Major Jesse Catt, although born in Thurnam, was a well known Brompton butcher, living and having a shop in Wood Street. After his death his son took over the business.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Volunteer Artillery Depot & Artillery Barracks, Garden Street, Brompton
« Reply #15 on: February 07, 2012, 21:29:58 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 19 February 1861

DEATHS
Catt — February 12, at Old Brompton. Mr. J. L. Catt, Sergeant Major 12th (Gillingham) Artillery Volunteers, aged 49 years.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Volunteer Artillery Depot & Artillery Barracks, Garden Street, Brompton
« Reply #14 on: February 05, 2012, 17:16:47 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 04 September 1860

CHATHAM.
The first inspection of the 12th (Chatham) Company of Volunteer Artillery was held on Saturday last by Viscount Sydney, the Lord-Lieutenant, who was accompanied by Lieutenant-Colonel Morris, Deputy Inspector-General of Volunteers. The company, numbering about 50 men assembled at Fort Amherst under the command of Captain J. E. Beveridge, and having been put through various evolutions, all of which were creditably performed, the Volunteers were marched down to the Cornwallis battery, for the purpose of being put through the great gun drill. After several rounds had been fired from the 68-pounder seige guns, the firing ceased, and the company having been re-formed Viscount Sydney addressed the officers and men, complimenting them on the highly effective manner in which they had acquitted themselves and the satisfactory appearance of the company.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Volunteer Artillery Depot & Artillery Barracks, Garden Street, Brompton
« Reply #13 on: February 05, 2012, 16:42:05 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 24 January 1860

CHATHAM.
The artillery corps formed at Brompton numbers about 50 members, and the necessary steps have been taken for its enrolment. Nearly £200 has been received in subscriptions.

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Offline kyn

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Thanks for the update :)

Offline Leofwine

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I checked the 1724 plan in the RE Museum today and it shows less of Brompton built than the 1779 plan. That suggests that the plans of buildings shown in Brompton and other areas were updated with the fortifications.
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Offline Leofwine

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oh, that IS an interesting one kyn, thank you for posting it.  One thing that  I have noticed with these plans is that the defences are often drawn on to a map surveyed at an earlier date. This one is a 1779 map on a 1724 survey. Some you posted on another thread showing the 1755 proposals were laid over the 1708 survey, etc.  I wonder how the civilian housing fits in to that scheme. If the way Brompton is shown is how it appeared in 1724, then that makes the Gunners Barracks much earlier than I thought (1720s). However, if the areas of building indicated are accurate to the 1779 date then Manor Street (c.1740-55) and Mansion Row (c.1755-85) are much later than I thought!  The fact that it shows Chatham Barracks, which we know were built from around 1757-60ish suggests post 1724 buildings are shown in addition to fortifications. However, there is no indication of the Marine Barracks which were started in 1777(?) and completed in 1779 (though admittedly they don't show up on the 1786 plan either).

There is a 1724 plan of the area in the R.E. Museum showing the area, I will have to check that when I visit on Wednesday and see how that compares to what is shown here.

The other thing of interest I did notice is Upbury Farm at the top right corner.
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Offline kyn

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I don't have a better view from the 1806 view but I did find this one....




Offline Leofwine

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Photo showing the later addition to the rear the old Gunners' Barracks.  You can just make out the change of brickwork below the trough formed by the two pitched rooves. There seems to be a similar addition at the other end of the barracks. Judging from the map evidence these extensions were added sometime after 1879. Note also the War Department boundary marker stone built into the wall (just left of the post box).


The stable block to the rear of the complex. Note another War Department boundary marker stone built into the wall (lower right, behind the drainpipe). The rear of the stable block is blank and adjoins an old yard. I believe this yard once ran right through to Manor Street and was known as 'Slate Yard' although now this is part of 15 Mansion Row.




You can just make out the roof of the small building in the NW corner of the complex (building 8 on the plan kyn posted)


I also realised that the small wood and brick building, number 7, on the plan kyn posted is the same location that by 1866 was the "Soldiers Infants Nursury". I wonder if it was the same building, or if the nursery replaced it?
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Offline Leofwine

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Thanks for posting those plans kyn. Very interesting details on them.  Dou you have more of that 1806 one, particularly showing how it relates to Mansion Row?  It is also interesting that on the 1830 map the avenues of walnut trees are noted as plantations and that they continue past the R.E. Barracks.

I have recently been closely studying the 1756 and 1786 plans of Chatham Lines in relation to another project, but in the process spotted that these Gunner's Barracks seem to appear on both. If this id correct it suggests they were already in situ, or at least planned, at the same time that Chatham Barracks was builf. If they were already built at the time of the first map then they technically pre-date Chatham Barracks.

I have circled what I believe are these barracks on the 1756 (left) and 1786 (right) maps. (Sadly I only have the 1756 in black and white, if anyone has a high res scan of it in colour I'd love a copy!)


A couple more photos of the barracks. The little angled 'tower' at the rear is a later addition to the main accommodation block, probably added after about 1880.


The building at the rear was a stable in the 1860s, now it is a garage - same function, different horsepower!


It is also worth noting that the Engineers office in Prince Edward's bastion appears to be present in the 1786 plan, but not in the 1756 plan. However, the workshops situated there by 1806 are absent. This suggests that the office may have been constructed in association with Debbeig's 1770s-80s modification of the Lines, not the later 1800-10 modifications. Perhaps it was originally Debbeig's accommodation/drawing office/etc.?
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