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Author Topic: Residential Wells  (Read 10241 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2012, 17:29:50 »
Kyn, have you got the rest of the 1879 plan in close up from Church Path to Gillingham Dockyard gate? This part of Gillingham is older and it might also clear up a mystery for me whether one location was a well or a cesspit.

I did have but seem to have misplaced it :(

darrenh

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2012, 21:12:35 »
we have a well in our back garden (been filled many years, now only a brick circle about 2 feet high)  its noted on OS maps as far back as i could trace last year.

we live in one of a pair of converted labourers cottages attached to a farm, an oast, barn, etc.  it was shared by that cluster of buildings, i think theres still a clause in the deeds or for the rite to pass or access the land

Offline swiftone

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2012, 07:36:00 »
Kyn, have you got the rest of the 1879 plan in close up from Church Path to Gillingham Dockyard gate? This part of Gillingham is older and it might also clear up a mystery for me whether one location was a well or a cesspit.

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2012, 02:49:42 »
Looking at the distribution of wells, almost all of those are on Mill Road/Church Path (Saunders Street), the two oldest roads on that part of the map being founded before 1840. The next oldest street (Lower Britton Street - now Arden Street) was, as far as I can figure out, begun c.1850 and has a couple and I don't see any in Fox Street or the other 1860s+ Streets. This might well tie in with the loss of the spring feeding the wells in 1856 (after which piped water was supplied to the area)
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Offline Sylvaticus

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2012, 00:07:09 »
I noticed that a number of them were on property boundaries, suggesting they were shared and related to the development, others just outside and presumably public. Suggesting Seafordpete is right.

Kyn, water is a an absolute necessity for a community. What is the cost of digging these wells compared to digging trenches and laying water mains to every house. It's a cost that has to be paid.

Offline kyn

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2012, 14:26:50 »
I was surprised as it would have been expensive to pay for a well to be dug, much of central Chatham must have either been too poor or already supplied with piped water as there are only a handful marked.

seafordpete

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2012, 13:56:35 »
How about them being the original watewr supply for 6 or 8 houses with a hand pump? I know in Newhaven there is at least one street where there is a well outside the back window of each house which supplied a hand pump in the kitchen, no reason to think that was a unique situation. Those houses were built 1880-1900

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2012, 12:58:25 »
I wonder if they were active wells or old ones? I know the dockyard extension works cut the springs feed in the many residential wells in Brompton in 1856, but I'm not sure if the same supply would have fed these New Brompton wells too.

There is some more on these wells in these threads: http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=7624.0 and http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=9084.0
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Offline Paul

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2012, 11:46:44 »
Well,well,well  :)

Were they proper wells or just bore holes I know it says "Wells"?
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline kyn

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Residential Wells
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2012, 11:42:05 »
This section of the 1879 Ordnance Survey plan showing Gillingham shows lots of wells in this area, I didn't realise personal wells were so popular!  I wonder if current residents know what they have in their garden, and if they were covered properly when they fell into disuse???

 

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