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Author Topic: Residential Wells  (Read 7529 times)

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Offline CAT

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #25 on: April 28, 2017, 12:22:01 »
Sad to say these features are more of an inconvenience to the modern building, as for some reason they always seem to be found on the site of a critical junction or corner of any new foundations (always puzzled me that one, as if the modern architect knows something the builder doesn't)?

Putting it below a glass plate can be a good idea, which I have seen done to both wells and cisterns, however, the damp conditions inside usually mean the underside of the glass goes green very quickly and without sealing it properly releases a strong musty smell.

I did see a series of these beneath the garden of a large house in Barham relined and a complex electric pump system operated in the garden shed to use the collected water from the roof of the house to water the garden. Very useful, but expensive?

Online Paolo

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #24 on: April 28, 2017, 08:22:52 »
Approximately when would this date from?

This extract from moleman58's original topic on Radnor Cliff:- (http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=11979.0)

"Now following up the subsequent occupiers and trying to look back at any previous owners/occupiers, but it could be this (1934/35) was when the house was built. There are no previous records in the electoral register, plus ties in with the OS map".

Main drainage was certainly in place at that time.  That, coupled with the fact that the house was so named and CAT's technical experience, would surely point away from a cess pit?

I fear that it may be demolished as it features nowhere on the plans for the new dwelling, although a glass floor over would be a lovely feature as long as it is a well and not a cess pit!

Offline CAT

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #23 on: April 28, 2017, 08:14:37 »
it could be a cess pit, however, cess pits were to allow liquid to drain whilst enabling solids to decompose. The solids would still amass until it would need emptying, which means a half decent access would be required. All the similar ones I've dealt with in the past don't have any sign of cess staining on the internal wall faces or residue of contents. The fact that they all still retain water, unless they have been infilled with rubble and waste soil suggests they are to retain water and not to allow it to leach away.

Offline conan

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #22 on: April 27, 2017, 23:51:35 »
Are we sure this a well? Being away from the house, could it be a cess pit?
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline CAT

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #21 on: April 27, 2017, 22:53:23 »
Usually these tend to date from the mid eighteenth-century through to the early twentieth-century with a hiatus during the mid-late nineteenth-century. Their loss as a feature occurs with the advent of piped water.

They are usually constructed completely below ground (notice the unfinished jointing of the brick works outer face) with a circular opening in the top, often covered with a shaped piece of Yorkstone. The pic Paolo posted clearly shows it after the ground level around it had been reduced by the new development.  It looks as if it was later capped with a concrete plug, possibly when it went out of use? There is a suggestion they were a more common garden feature as they are frequently found away from the main dwelling? Usually they tend to be about 2-3m in diameter and up to 3-4m deep. However I worked on a pair in the grounds of Sharstead Court, next to the gardeners cottage, that were roughly 5m in diameter and nearly 7m deep.

Online Paolo

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2017, 21:34:11 »
Not sure about the date, smiffy but believe Well House to be early 20th century.  There was a query on the forum from the new owner of No. 2 (property now converted to two semi-detached houses), moleman, some while ago, as to the architect, possibly Voysey.

CAT - the cistern, if such, is a considerable distance from the property but I guess sited to be a garden feature?  As there is no entry visible from the brickwork so far revealed I presume that  the feeder pipe would be at ground level?  Certainly plenty of water pouring out from the cliff above, which has a base of impermeable gault clay.

Online smiffy

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #19 on: April 27, 2017, 20:49:32 »
Approximately when would this date from?

Offline CAT

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #18 on: April 27, 2017, 20:14:44 »
I've encountered dozens in various locations across Kent. As opposed to it being a well in the traditional sense, this is a water cistern for storing water, mainly from roofs. If correct it should be lined internally with a waterproof render, including its base. This means that water from the surrounding geology cannot seep in and taint the fresh water within. They are usually connected with a hand pump via a lead or iron pipe. As you said Paolo they are constructed from the inside similar to a well.

Online Paolo

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2017, 18:04:18 »
Developers have uncovered this beauty in land adjoining Well House, Radnor Cliff, Folkestone.  What intrigues me is the tapered top.  From the quality of the brickwork I imagine it to have been built from the outside.  I was invited to climb inside to check but that was an offer I could refuse.

Have any subscribers encountered anything similar before.  Why would one taper a well or build it so wide that it had to be tapered?

Offline swiftone

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #16 on: March 19, 2012, 19:00:43 »
These wells in Wyles St. do not make it to many maps including Kyn's. I originally marked this as 1885 then changed it to 1866, but I cannot remember why.



Compare it to the old-maps of 1885



Kyn's map also shows a well about where the entrance to Admirals Gardens is.

These maps should load quite fast as there is plenty of white space on them.

Offline swiftone

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2012, 08:01:29 »
That's great, thanks a lot Kyn. I think that map is based on the 1860's first edition O.S. map. Besides the wells it also shows a couple of other interesting facts. I need to investigate further.

Offline kyn

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #14 on: March 16, 2012, 20:37:59 »
Here you go swiftone.

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2012, 16:00:09 »
It still seems funny to me but my Mum and Dad lived in  one of that little block of 4 houses you can see at the end of the gardens just under the name Fox Terrace. The only way you could get to it was down an alley from Saunders St, and I think you could also get to it from an alley in Fox St, it was numbered 48 Saunders St but you wouldn't know they were there if you were looking for the house number. When they were there , there was another house opposite all on it's own which isn't on that map. I didn't realise the house was that old  :)
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline swiftone

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2012, 15:50:13 »
Found it!


Thanks Kyn. Have you got this section of the 1879 in close up which is north of the last one.


Offline kyn

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Re: Residential Wells
« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2012, 17:37:42 »
Found it!

 

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