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Author Topic: Dockyard Letters  (Read 12657 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Dockyard Letters
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2012, 18:37:58 »
Chatham Dock 11th May 1745.

Gentlemen,

This ???? the receipt of your two warrants of the 10th instant to the Offices at Sheerness, to supply his majestys ship Kinsale with standing riggings &c. and refit the Pearl for foreigne service, and your two letters of the 10th to me; your directions in them shall be punctually comply’d with.
Inclosed is an account from the Officers of the Ropeyard, of such Ropemakers as absent themselves, and those that come to their duty peaceably.  I am

Gentlemen
Your most humble servant
Charles Brown

Offline kyn

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Dockyard Letters
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2012, 17:48:50 »
Chatham Dock 10th May 1745.

Gentlemen,

I have received tour warrant of the 8th instant to the offices at Sheerness, to repair the knee of the head of his majesty’s ship Dover &c., a letter of the 9th to them concerning theGorcum (?) Dutch auxiliary ship of warre anchor and cable, and your letter of the same date to me, to cause a sufficient number of the ordinary and riggers of this yard, to assist in sending the Prince George to Blackstakes (?).
Inclosed is a letter from the storekeeper at Sheerness, praying an anchor of 48.  3.  0. may be sent hither and a letter from the Clerk of the Ropery and for soap.  Also a list of the ropemakers absent to day, by which it appears, there are twenty Spinners and one labourer wilfully so.  And it is my opinion, if the now enclosed servants are supposed to come to work, the Spinners &c. that are at work to day will again stand out, which I leave to your consideration.  And am

Gentlemen
Your most humble servant
Charles Brown.

P.S. Our people W???ped the Prince George to Gillingham yesterday.

Offline kyn

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Dockyard Letters
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2012, 20:04:32 »
All documents courtesy of Martin Rogers.

Chatham Dock 9 May 1745.

Gentlemen,

I have received your warrant of the 7 inst. to the Officers of this yard, to receive stores in answer to their demand of the 4th and your letter of the 7th by post, and two of the 8th by your messenger at seven last night concerning the Ropemakers.  And shall be carefull in following your direction therein, all the Ropemakers came to me at the hill house yesterday, noon, to here I was carrying on the recalls, and gave for reason why they did not come to work in the morning, as they had promised me the day before, that the R. Honourbale, the Lords Commissioners of the Amiralty, had granted the Ropemakers of Woolwich yard leave (as they say) to continue in their business with only six servants, they prayed to be on the same?ool, or at least to have ?evered your order for enloring (?) a servant to every eigth man, and all the condiscention I could then bring them to, I was, to say that they would come to work this morning if those servants were not called, ?? the answer to their position was come, which I complied with rather than the work of the Ropeyard should stand still.  This morning came to their call one hundred twenty four, when but sixty two of them went for work, the rest giving for reason, that the new foreman should not be allowed two servants, two horses a??r they sent in three of their party, tot ell me, that, they will all come in to morrow morning, and continue to work ?? receive your finall answer.

I have now paid away all the money, at the hill house, and as the ships in the River Thames are not come down to the Nore, the pay Clerks at present have nothing to do.

Gentlemen,
Your most humble servant
Charles Brown

Absent 10th May 1745

Spinners
Henry Swedland}
Richard Carr}
Edward Linch}-sick
Thomas Gaskin}

Daniel Collins}
Richard Smith}-Lame
William Coomber
Thomas Clark
William Jannett
James Baker
William Stonestreet
John Pickman
John Patrick
John Ayres
John Holiday
John Joy
John Commber
William Howseg??
Thomas Howell
Jacob Kent
Stephen Wright
James Tornley
Richard Jackson
Robert Day
John Pelarless (?)
William Martin

Hatchellers
John Barry – Lame

Labourers
Martin Day
William Watchman – Lame
William Siborn - Sick


 

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