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Author Topic: Fire Beacons  (Read 26019 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #38 on: March 18, 2017, 23:30:00 »
Sandhurst

Offline kyn

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #37 on: July 09, 2016, 22:26:54 »
First one is at Hever Castle, the second is along the road on public ground near the church.

Offline kyn

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #36 on: April 19, 2016, 18:17:16 »
Barham

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #35 on: February 13, 2015, 15:36:40 »
And the last one, hopefully :)

Apologies, broken link, here's the new one.
http:////www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Pub/ArchCant/Vol.046 - 1934/046-08.pdf

Thanks to RD for pointing them out :)

They worked perfectly when first posted.
Debe  Ali Farka Touré & Toumani Diabaté

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #34 on: December 30, 2014, 21:06:14 »
The first beacons in Kent, apart from possible Roman or Saxon beacons, were set up in 1326.

From 1377, the first year of Richard II.
"An ordinance for safeguarding the Counties of Kent and of Essex, particularly for the towns lying on the River Thames from the perils which, may suddenly come upon them from our enemies, which God forbid; and also for the safeguard of the Navy being in the ports of the said river.
   First, let there be ordained in the Isle of Shepeye a beacon (beken), and at Showbery in Essex another beacon. Item, at Hoo in Kent a beacon, and at Fobbyng in Essex another beacon.  Item, at Cleve in Kent a beacon, and at Tilbury in Essex another beacon. Item, at Gravesend in Kent a beacon, and at Hornedon in Essex another beacon.
Item, that by the especial command of our very noble Lord, the King, the Sheriffs (Viscountz), Constables and other officials in the aforesaid parts of Kent and Essex be charged that all the said beacons be speedily and suitably set up and prepared in the above-named places for the safe-guarding of the country and of the said Navy.
Item, that as soon as the said beacons be made, they shall be well and suitably watched, as well by day as by night, without fail. Item, that the watchmen, who, at the time, shall be at the said beacons, and particularly, at the beacons of Shepeye and Shoubery, shall be from time to time warned and charged that, as soon as they can see any vessels of the enemy coming by sail or by oars towards the said river, then the said two beacons of Shepeye and Shoubery be set on fire, and therewith to make all the noise they can with horn or by shouting, to warn the country round to come with all their force to the said river, each to the aid of the others, to resist our enemies."


Taken from The Beacon System in Kent, a 23 page paper by H. T. White, A.M.I.C.E.
Archaeologia Cantiana. Vol. 46 1934.
Available online @ http://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Pub/ArchCant/Vol.046 - 1934/046-08 The Beacon System in Kent.pdf
The paper includes the 1570 map by William Lambarde.
Debe  Ali Farka Touré & Toumani Diabaté

Offline kyn

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #33 on: August 10, 2013, 22:38:08 »
Temple Ewell

Pglen

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #32 on: June 04, 2012, 11:36:13 »
Having just joined the forum, and at the risk of over-egging it may be of interest to know that Wiliam Lambard, the historian who wrote about Kent in 1570, published a map showing the position of the beacons (he was criticised for doing so, for security reasons!). The map can be seen at http://www.folkscape.org.uk/beackent.htm The beacons were only marginally successful - inclement weather and especially fogs; and during the day they were not easy to see - but their main drawback was that the only connection to London from the entire coast where continental invasions were likely - from Folkestone to Fairlight and beyond westwards - was via the Medway Gap, where there was a beacon at Birling.  The beacon on Windmill Hill, Gravesend (shown on one of the pictures) is being lit at 10.15 this evening.

Peter

tedthedog

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #31 on: October 24, 2011, 16:01:03 »
The beacon at Beltinge blew down recently but I am pleased to say that the Local Authority repaired and replaced it

Offline BenG

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #30 on: October 21, 2011, 19:01:42 »
Dartford way:


Offline Glen

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #29 on: November 03, 2010, 19:59:10 »
Gravesend





Glen

oldsunset

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #28 on: May 03, 2010, 13:37:52 »
in 1977 most uk towns and boroughs applied for a grant to erect a new beacon on an old beacon site to celebrate the queens silver jubilee


A nationwide network of beacons, organised by the Royal Institution Of Chartered Surveyors in eight continuous chains linking Windsor with the extremities of the United Kingdom, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.
the Queen lit the first one at 22.00 at Great Windsor Park, the beacons were then lit across the uk to show the extent of the realm

1,600 were lit again for MH's golden jubliee worldwide with some as remote as the antartic (article in The Times 22 may 2002)

most of the photos show these 1977 beacons

merc

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #27 on: March 18, 2010, 12:23:05 »
1803

The Beacons are establishing at Canterbury, Shorncliff, Barham, Isle Of Thanet, Shottenden, Hythe, Poolingdown, Westwell, Pluckley, Lynham Hill, Chatham Lines, Wrotham Hill, Tenterden, Highgate, near Hawkhurst and Gouldhurst, which beginning from Canterbury or Shorncliff, will be succesively fired on the near approach, or actual landing of the enemy on the coast of Kent, and on which signal, everyone is to assemble at his known place of rendezvous, and there expect and recieve orders from the general Officer, under whose comand the several Volunteers and other Corps may be placed. The fire-beacons are stakes of wood, and other materials, with a pole passing through them, on the top of which is a small white flag, to make their situation more visable. When the alarm is given in the day, means will be taken to make a great smoke, accompanied with fire.

aitch

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2010, 21:11:36 »
I'm sure there used to be beacons on the tops of some church's including Rainham church. These ran up from the coast and were the highest point so could be seen for a long distance I think these ran from the coast up and into London.

Offline BenG

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #25 on: September 20, 2009, 18:03:29 »
Found this one when out for a walk.
Near the Rheims Way, Canterbury in the park along the Stour.




Offline kyn

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Re: Fire Beacons
« Reply #24 on: August 15, 2009, 20:25:17 »
Dover Castle

 

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