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Author Topic: Fog in the 50's  (Read 14795 times)

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Offline filmer01

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #31 on: January 19, 2015, 14:35:42 »
The dense fogs of the late 50s had one advantage to me. I lived near Hartlip and went to school in Sittingbourne about 4 miles away, catching the 26 bus each way - no school specials then. If it was foggy then early afternoon I would be told to leave Barrow Grove School in case the buses stopped running, only drawback was how slow they went, probably quicker to walk, but I was out of school  :)
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Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #30 on: January 18, 2015, 21:05:51 »
We had thick, and I mean thick, with visibility of 3 yards - fog in the 40's as well. Everyone had at least 1 coal fire for heating the house, so the combined smoke contributed to the density. Meteorologically, a temperature inversion, where the temperature at altitute was greater than at ground level, thus preventing it from escaping upwards. In the 50's this was called smog and was certainly bad for your lungs! We used to put a handkerchief over our mouths as a filter- orange/black deposit! The clean air act, smokeless fuel, put paid to all that in the 60's. Of interest, the "warmist lobby", ignore all the centuries of heating that way with its carbon monoxide and dioxide when they blame global warming on modern fuels, oil/gas/coal fired power stations and petrol/diesel/paraffin, cars and aircraft. Dave Smith.

Offline Signals99

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #29 on: January 13, 2015, 12:41:24 »
I attempted to post this some time ago but was told I was not a member (see frustrated post).
I well recall the fog or "smog" days. I worked on BR as a fire man at Gillingham locomotive shed.
I was sent to Bricklayers Arms loco on loan. I ended up on piloting locos to a London terminus station. We then handed them over to the main line crews. I often had to leave the footplate and climb a gantry to see if the signal was on or off (pre-colour light days). No high viz vests in those days. I did 48 hours before my relief arrived, sleeping in the sand drying room when I could (no elf and safety then). I earned so much that week  I had to be paid in two lots over two weeks. Happy days.

Offline pr1uk

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #28 on: November 27, 2014, 13:54:15 »
It's hard to tell people how hard it was to walk in the smog, as Jean said, you could not see across the road and I mean narrow roads plus the smell of smoke and you had warnings on the wireless that if elderly to stay inside if possible. The only good thing was it was in the days when only the rich workers, Police, Teachers or bank managers had cars, so crossing most roads was not a problem but it was a little scary.
To be contented in life you must learn the difference between what you want and what you need
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Offline Jean

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #27 on: November 26, 2014, 21:37:07 »
I was eleven in the late fifties and had to walk two miles from Walderslade girls school to my home. I remember one occasion walking home on my own, in the smog, which was so thick I could not see the other side of the road and I had no idea where to cross. I could hear the  ships from Chatham Dockyard using their fog horns. This was common practice when the smog was bad. To me it was a very lonely sound, especially at night.   I eventually arrived home but much later than usual, feeling quite shaken by the experience.

Offline rochester1

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #26 on: May 04, 2012, 16:20:30 »
 My mate and I went to the Majestic Cinema in the early 50's, we walked from Valley View Road to Star Hill and after about an hour and a half arrived to find the fog inside the cinema was nearly as thick as that outside!
The fogs continued into the 60's when I was working for a small local builder Dennis Wadhams. we were working at Meopham and encountered the fog when driving back home in the evening. It was so thick that they said I should get out and walk along the gutter and they would follow me! This was OK until a vehicle overtook them and they set off in pursuit. You're right.... they left me walking along the gutter. I got home eventually!

erfman

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #25 on: April 30, 2012, 22:13:36 »
smog!! isn't it ashame that nobody was walking in front of the bus on dock road in 1951! erfman

Offline smiler

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #24 on: April 30, 2012, 12:31:11 »
This is from December 1962

Offline AlanH

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #23 on: April 29, 2012, 05:26:51 »
Peasoupers were what the the smog was called I think. So thick you couldn't see where you were going. Many people with lung problems died due to these which was why the clean air act was enacted to force the burning of cleaner fuels.
I remember guiding a bus along Arethusa Road in the early 50s as far as the terminus. I don't know how he got back onto City Way and the depot but it would have taken him ages at the slow pace we'd gone at.
AlanH.

Chatham_Girl85

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #22 on: April 27, 2012, 17:46:00 »
One thing the smog was good for when I was a nipper.. Knock down ginger. Do a number of houses together and then stand a little way a way and listen. :)


That just made me giggle :)

They must have heard us, falling about with laughter, Chatham_girl85 :)

They must have done.
I can just imagine all these doors opening, and all the neighbours standing around chatting wondering who had knocked on who's door.

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #21 on: April 27, 2012, 16:27:18 »
One thing the smog was good for when I was a nipper.. Knock down ginger. Do a number of houses together and then stand a little way a way and listen. :)


That just made me giggle :)

They must have heard us, falling about with laughter, Chatham_girl85 :)

Chatham_Girl85

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2012, 15:57:38 »
One thing the smog was good for when I was a nipper.. Knock down ginger. Do a number of houses together and then stand a little way a way and listen. :)


That just made me giggle :)

Offline pr1uk

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #19 on: April 27, 2012, 15:55:11 »
Quote
I remember no cars in our road in the smog.. out of 50 homes nobody had a car :-)

Your remember collecting car numbers then I walked all around my area and never managed one side of a small notebook people went to work on a Bus, Train, Bike or walked and children 'walked' to school no matter how far, we were a lot slimmer and fitter then. Miss those days, children now don't seem to play outside don't walk anywhere and they wonder why we have so many fat children nowadays.

But ! I dont miss the smog it was horrible and as someone said the clean air act and smokeless zones was a very good idea and now those choking days are well and truly over.
To be contented in life you must learn the difference between what you want and what you need
-Peter

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #18 on: April 27, 2012, 12:39:57 »
One thing the smog was good for when I was a nipper.. Knock down ginger. Do a number of houses together and then stand a little way a way and listen. :)

torpointblue

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Re: Fog in the 50's
« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2012, 12:11:14 »
" I remember it well " There were no cars parked in the roads   , it was  too dangerous to  leave them out in the roads  .I also remember in 1954 when I was attending a course in the Eastend of London the bus travelled very very slowly as the fog was so bad it was almost impossible to see  the shop windows as we passed  them .

I remenmber no cars in our road in the smog.. out of 50 homes nobody had a car :-)

 

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