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Author Topic: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection  (Read 25297 times)

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Offline Local Hiker

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #42 on: August 13, 2016, 09:35:51 »
The branch track has now been severed at its junction with the main line, so sadly is no more.

Offline Local Hiker

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #41 on: January 09, 2016, 22:27:05 »
The link below to a Medway Council Plan, showing a shared cycle/bus track, gives some clue to ideas being discussed.

Having been on it recently, (see guess the place Reply #2046 on: December 10, 2015, 08:51:08), it clearly has no future for any Class 66's hauling freight out of the docks.

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjQj5an3p3KAhVG2xoKHf6bCj4QFgg1MAM&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.medway.gov.uk%2Fpdf%2FAppendix%2520to%2520Briefing%2520note%2520no.%25203%2520%2520Gillingham%2520Railway%2520map.pdf&usg=AFQjCNGAQUQ7nrtSfsEgJvWp4vXsC4QLgw

Offline JohnWalker

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #40 on: January 07, 2016, 11:11:57 »
Anyone know if there are plans for the remaining trackway?

Offline Signals99

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #39 on: January 07, 2016, 02:00:30 »
Trikeman, thank you for posting those shots of the old dockyard spur, it opens up the flood gates of nostalgia for me. As a fireman working out of Gillingham motive power depot, I often did the dockyard run. It brings back memories of C class locos (I don't think any other class could do the runs). I think track restrictions were the reason. Anyway thanks for the memory mate.

Offline Trikeman

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #38 on: January 06, 2016, 23:11:43 »
Gillingham Junction for Chatham Dockyard spur - Dec 2015.
Don't suppose the rails will last much longer now that the line has been rudely terminated. How the trees have grown up - they love disused railways!
Trikeman
Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast

Offline GP

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #37 on: June 18, 2015, 09:15:42 »
Isnít that where the new mini-town Ė housing, schools and other facilities, is to be built? So no prospect of reinstating the line - quite the contrary, I imagine the bridge will be demolished and the whole line eventually removed.

The railway line from Gillingham station to the Dockyard could become a cycle track perhaps ?

Mark_Smithers

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #36 on: June 17, 2015, 16:03:32 »
Sadly, Mike this is a myth that has been repeated over and over again! There were ten locomotives on the 18 inch gauge Chatham Dockyard system during its lifetime - six small Manning Wardles, three large Manning Wardles and one Dick, Kerr product, all 0-4-0STs. The 18 inch gauge 0-4-2Ts, 2-4-2Ts and one Manning Wardle 0-4-0ST belonged to the Royal Engineers and were used on the R.E's own tramway serving the R.E. Park and the Chatham Eastern Defences (Borstal) line. The Dockyard's 18 inch gauge railway, or at least locomotive working, lasted until 1949.
The narrow gauge railway in the Dockyard was first built C1860 and lasted until C1936. It was of 18" gauge and made use of sections of cast plate track sections, some of which can still be seen in the 'yard to-day. A total of twenty six loco's are known to have operated on the system of 0-4-0, 0-4-2, and 2-4-2 wheel arrangements. Most were built new for Chatham but several were transferred from Woolwich Arsenal which had a similar system. And indeed three were subsequently transferred out to Woolmer Military Railway.
The attached photo shows "Vulcan" of 1883, built by Vulcan Foundry, new to Chatham.

Most of the above comes from "Military Railways of Ken"t by R M Lyne.

I hope this is of interest.

Offline mikeb

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #35 on: June 13, 2015, 17:57:37 »
The narrow gauge railway in the Dockyard was first built C1860 and lasted until C1936. It was of 18" gauge and made use of sections of cast plate track sections, some of which can still be seen in the 'yard to-day. A total of twenty six loco's are known to have operated on the system of 0-4-0, 0-4-2, and 2-4-2 wheel arrangements. Most were built new for Chatham but several were transferred from Woolwich Arsenal which had a similar system. And indeed three were subsequently transferred out to Woolmer Military Railway.
The attached photo shows "Vulcan" of 1883, built by Vulcan Foundry, new to Chatham.

Most of the above comes from "Military Railways of Ken"t by R M Lyne.

I hope this is of interest.

Mark_Smithers

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #34 on: June 13, 2015, 15:30:49 »
Did he know any details about the narrow gauge locos - i.e. what gauge, wheel arrangement, side or saddle tanks etc?
The Oracle did say that cameras were not exactly welcomed in the Dock Yard. This was before the preservation movement got going and the likes of Ivo Peters, Arthur Wells and Peter Ransom-Wallis had much easier targets for their work anyway. I doubt very much that there would be any pictures, happy to be proven wrong as always.

S4.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #33 on: June 12, 2015, 19:15:02 »
The Oracle did say that cameras were not exactly welcomed in the Dock Yard. This was before the preservation movement got going and the likes of Ivo Peters, Arthur Wells and Peter Ransom-Wallis had much easier targets for their work anyway. I doubt very much that there would be any pictures, happy to be proven wrong as always.

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Mark_Smithers

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #32 on: June 12, 2015, 13:40:45 »
Were any photographs taken of these narrow gauge locomotives at the time?
I had a very interesting chat with The Oracle last night and the subject of the Dockyard Branch came up (our conversations can be very random at times, I think we were talking about Yukon Stern Wheel River Steamers at the time.....).

The trains for the Dockyard would be formed in the Down Sidings at Gillingham and then with a brake van on the back and the C class (generally) running tender first, the train would be eased down the bank. They would come to a stand at the Dock Gate and wait to be allowed into the yard proper. When there, they would not be allowed beyond a board that stated something like 'No Main Line Locomotives Beyond This Point'. The Dockyard locos would then remove the guards van and shunt the train away, generally 12 vehicles. During this time the fireman would be preparing his fire, very deep at the back under the door and the back corners, to the point that burning coal would fall out when the door was opened. He would also have the water just in the top nut of the water glass, any higher and the loco would carry water into the cylinders when starting on the grade and up the bank. Also at no point were the footplate crew allowed down to the ground. If the driver wished to do some oiling or he wanted to check the front end from the ground he had to be escorted by a Policeman, several always on duty at the gates. He was allowed to climb along the cab sides and onto the running plates PROVIDING he did not set foot on the ground. After some 45 mins or an hour the Dockyard locos would have made up a train of empties and put the Guards van back at which point the ensemble would punch its way back up to the Down sidings and prepare the next train or general shunting if needed.

I asked about the narrow gauge locos and boilers that were stored nearby and if he had seen them. I was told that there were two locos disassembled and a couple of boilers, both had numbers painted on the barrels, along with a large amount of what could only be described as spare parts for them. As an aside, I said things get random, in 1953 The Oracle was part owner of a Robey Steam roller. They managed to get a contract for rolling roads in the dockyard and The Oracle spent three days doing so, his partner had done about three weeks and needed a break. At this point the remains of the locos were still in place then as he had to take on coal from that end of the yard. He said that they were in a triangular compound approx 40' x 50' x 50' surrounded by a chain link fence and completely overgrown by then.

S4.

Mark_Smithers

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #31 on: June 10, 2015, 22:40:59 »
I had a very interesting chat with The Oracle last night and the subject of the Dockyard Branch came up (our conversations can be very random at times, I think we were talking about Yukon Stern Wheel River Steamers at the time.....).

The trains for the Dockyard would be formed in the Down Sidings at Gillingham and then with a brake van on the back and the C class (generally) running tender first, the train would be eased down the bank. They would come to a stand at the Dock Gate and wait to be allowed into the yard proper. When there, they would not be allowed beyond a board that stated something like 'No Main Line Locomotives Beyond This Point'. The Dockyard locos would then remove the guards van and shunt the train away, generally 12 vehicles. During this time the fireman would be preparing his fire, very deep at the back under the door and the back corners, to the point that burning coal would fall out when the door was opened. He would also have the water just in the top nut of the water glass, any higher and the loco would carry water into the cylinders when starting on the grade and up the bank. Also at no point were the footplate crew allowed down to the ground. If the driver wished to do some oiling or he wanted to check the front end from the ground he had to be escorted by a Policeman, several always on duty at the gates. He was allowed to climb along the cab sides and onto the running plates PROVIDING he did not set foot on the ground. After some 45 mins or an hour the Dockyard locos would have made up a train of empties and put the Guards van back at which point the ensemble would punch its way back up to the Down sidings and prepare the next train or general shunting if needed.

I asked about the narrow gauge locos and boilers that were stored nearby and if he had seen them. I was told that there were two locos disassembled and a couple of boilers, both had numbers painted on the barrels, along with a large amount of what could only be described as spare parts for them. As an aside, I said things get random, in 1953 The Oracle was part owner of a Robey Steam roller. They managed to get a contract for rolling roads in the dockyard and The Oracle spent three days doing so, his partner had done about three weeks and needed a break. At this point the remains of the locos were still in place then as he had to take on coal from that end of the yard. He said that they were in a triangular compound approx 40' x 50' x 50' surrounded by a chain link fence and completely overgrown by then.

S4.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #30 on: April 12, 2015, 21:15:11 »
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline Local Hiker

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #29 on: April 12, 2015, 20:48:05 »
The northern end of the bridge borders the nuclear dump, so I doubt if there will be much development in the immediate vicinity of the bridge.

In fact, Peel Ports "illustrative plan" still has the bridge and rail link to Number 3 Basin amongst all the new development.

See link
http://www.chathamwaters.co.uk/masterplan/illustrative

Offline peterchall

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Re: Chatham Dockyard Railway Connection
« Reply #28 on: April 12, 2015, 18:07:11 »
Isnít that where the new mini-town Ė housing, schools and other facilities, is to be built? So no prospect of reinstating the line - quite the contrary, I imagine the bridge will be demolished and the whole line eventually removed.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

 

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